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December 2014

  • Videophones at University of Michigan Health System benefit deaf visitors, patients (12/03/07)
    The University of Michigan Health System is one of the first hospitals in the country to provide a Sorenson VP-200® videophone for its patients and staff who are deaf and hard-of-hearing, and who use American Sign Language to communicate. Recently, UMHS also became one the first American hospitals to offer access to such communication in patients’ rooms and in the emergency department.

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  • Videophones benefit deaf visitors, patients (12/03/07)
    The University of Michigan Health System is one of the first hospitals in the country to provide a Sorenson VP-200® videophone for its patients and staff who are deaf and hard-of-hearing, and who use American Sign Language to communicate. Recently, UMHS also became one the first American hospitals to offer access to such communication in patients’ rooms and in the emergency department.

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November 2007

  • Dr. Eva Feldman to head Taubman Institute (11/29/07)
    Eva Feldman, M.D., Ph.D., has been selected to direct the U-M Medical School's new A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute, which was established through a $22 million gift from the retail pioneer whose name it bears.

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  • U-M receives 45 medical history paintings from Pfizer (11/29/07)
    U-M will become the new home to a well-known series of 45 paintings depicting great moments in medical history, thanks to a gift from Pfizer. The paintings, by Michigan painter Robert A. Thom, were commissioned in the 1950s by Parke-Davis.

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  • Gene study supports single main migration across Bering Strait (11/27/07)
    A U-M analysis of genetic variation among more than two dozen native populations bolsters the theory that the ancestors of modern native peoples across the Americas came via a northwest land bridge some 12,000 years ago.

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  • Study: More young Americans with diabetes hospitalized (11/27/07)
    A new study from researchers at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital finds a significant increase in the rate of hospitalizations among young Americans with diabetes. And, they say, this growing trend is costing Medicaid and private insurers billions each year in hospital fees.

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  • Violent TV, games pack a powerful public health threat (11/27/07)
    Watching media violence significantly increases the risk that a viewer or video game player will behave aggressively in both the short and long term, according to a University of Michigan study published today in a special issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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  • Cancer drug works by stimulating cancer gene (11/20/07)
    A University of Michigan study shows the novel way in which bortezomib, a promising new cancer drug, actually works. It revs up a key oncogene enough to cause tumor cells to self-destruct, suggesting a new strategy for developing cancer treatments in melanoma and other cancers.

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  • A cheap, safe treatment for sinus problems (11/19/07)
    An inexpensive, safe and easy treatment is an effective method for treating chronic nasal and sinus symptoms - more effective, in fact, than commonly used saline sprays, according to a new study from University of Michigan Health System researchers..

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  • Older workers stress less, U-M study suggests (11/19/07)
    Older workers generally report low levels of work-related stress, according to a University of Michigan study of a nationally representative sample of older workers.

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  • Pedometers motivate people with diabetes to walk more (11/19/07)
    The use of a pedometer and a Web site that tracked physical activity levels proved to be powerful motivators for people with diabetes who participated in a recent walking study conducted by researchers from the University of Michigan Health System and VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System.

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  • Diabetes patients face multiple health woes (11/14/07)
    As if diabetes weren’t enough, a new study shows that 92 percent of older people with the disease have at least one other major chronic medical condition - and that nearly half have three or more major diseases besides diabetes. The sheer number, severity, and type of these other conditions all appear to decrease patients’ ability to manage their diabetes.

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  • Study questions quality indicator for colon cancer surgeries (11/13/07)
    Detecting cancer in lymph nodes following surgery lets doctors determine how advanced the cancer is and whether chemotherapy is appropriate. Using the number of lymph nodes examined after colon cancer surgery, or colectomy, as a hospital quality indicator is gaining momentum. But is more necessarily better?

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  • Caregivers benefit from cancer support programs (11/12/07)
    video  Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center found that a targeted intervention aimed at prostate cancer patients and their caregiver spouses provided significant improvements for the spouse in physical and emotional quality of life.

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  • College students not well-prepared to treat food allergies (11/12/07)
    In one of the few studies ever to focus on food allergies among college students, University of Michigan Health System researchers have found that a surprising number of these young adults are not prepared to rapidly treat themselves in case of an allergic reaction and often are not vigilant about avoiding foods that contain allergens.

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  • Lung-on-a-chip leads to new insights on pulmonary diseases (11/12/07)
    A new "lung-on-a-chip" developed at the University of Michigan mimics the fluid mechanics of the real thing on a plastic wafer just bigger than a quarter. It allows researchers to grow lung airway cells that act more like they're in a human body instead of a Petri dish.

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  • U-M poll: Pain at the pump could hurt kids’ health (11/12/07)
    video  A new report by the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health indicates that higher gas prices this year are putting the squeeze on how parents are managing health care for their children - either in getting to health care visits or purchasing medications. And U-M experts say a possible solution may be a gas card program for patients.

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  • November marks Lung Cancer Awareness Month (11/09/07)
    Lung cancer will kill more Americans this year than any other cancer, claiming more lives than the next four leading cancer killers -- breast, prostate, colon and pancreas cancers -- combined. The facts about lung cancer are startling, and few people realize the true scope of the disease. University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center expert provides the top nine facts to know about lung cancer.

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  • Chronic disease programs receive prestigious certification (11/05/07)
    The Medical Management Center at the University of Michigan Health System now has seven programs that have received Disease-Specific Care Certification by The Joint Commission, the same accrediting body that examines and accredits hospitals to ensure safe and effective medical care.

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  • CVC doctors to perform operation live on the Web (11/05/07)
    On Tuesday, Nov. 6, a University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center team will perform such a minimally invasive procedure, called an endovascular repair, with cameras capturing their every move for live broadcast over the World Wide Web.

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  • Fear of weight gain may keep women from trying to quit smoking (11/05/07)
    video  Is a fear of getting fatter partly to blame for the fact that nearly one in five American women still smokes, and many don’t try to quit? According to U-M researchers, smokers are more likely to have unrealistic body image and eating problems, and women who had weight problems as girls are more likely to start smoking early.

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  • Labels like ‘normal’ and ‘abnormal’ on test results affect patients’ decisions (11/05/07)
    Patients whose physicians place labels on their test results - such as normal or abnormal, positive or negative - are inclined to make different decisions about their health care than those who receive the same results solely in terms of numbers and other quantifiable measures, according to a new study.

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  • Less sleep may expand kids’ waistlines (11/05/07)
    Diets high in fat and sugar may not be the only things contributing to American children’s expanding waistlines. According to a new study published by researchers at U-M C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, kids who aren’t getting enough sleep also may be at an increased risk for being overweight.

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  • Make Thanksgiving dinner healthy without the loss of flavor-packed foods (11/05/07)
    video  A traditional holiday meal could be on the menu for you as long as you make some slight modifications to cut back on fat and sodium, and to add more vegetables and whole grains. U-M nutrition experts say doing so could save the typical person a staggering 50 to 60 grams of fat during the Thanksgiving meal.

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  • Lung cancer researcher honored (11/01/07)
    A University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center doctor is part of a team that was awarded the Michigan Cancer Consortium’s highest honor. The Lung Cancer Early Detection Workgroup, which Gregory Kalemkerian, M.D., co-chaired, received the MCC Spirit of Collaboration Award.

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  • Predicting survival after liver transplantation (11/01/07)
    Patients awaiting liver transplantation who also suffer from coronary disease, diabetes, COPD, connective tissue disease or renal insufficiency may face poorer survival after liver transplantation, a new study finds. Researchers say these study results, published in Liver Transplantation, will be useful when counseling patients with comorbidities about outcomes after transplantation.

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  • Two new U-M studies emphasize the need for speed in helping stroke victims (11/01/07)
    Sixty-nine percent of stroke victims still don’t reach the hospital in the first three hours after their stroke symptoms begin, a new study finds. More public education about the need for speed in responding to a stroke could help - - including a middle-school education effort shown successful in another new study.

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October 2007

  • MVN announces flu shot clinics (10/31/07)
    Visits to flu clinics run by the University of Michigan Health System’s Michigan Visiting Nurses and other health care providers across the country are down this year, a decrease that MVN attributes to a current lack of a widespread flu outbreak and a subsequent complacency among the public. But the threat of a flu epidemic is as real as ever. MVN's flu shot clinic schedule for November and December is now available.

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  • One in 7 Americans over age 70 has dementia (10/30/07)
    One in seven Americans over the age of 70 suffers from dementia, according to the first known nationally representative, population-based study to include men and women from all regions of the country.

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  • Study of suicide among veterans yields key findings (10/30/07)
    The largest and most up-to-date study of suicides among depressed veterans provides important new data that may help guide screening and treatment for all veterans. The study, conducted by VA and U-M researchers, finds that the predictors of suicide among veterans in depression treatment differ from those seen in the general American population.

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  • Treadmill training helps Down syndrome babies walk months earlier (10/30/07)
    Starting Down syndrome infants on treadmill training for just minutes a day can help them walk up to four or five months earlier than with only traditional physical therapy, a new study from the University of Michigan says.

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  • 5 Halloween safety tips for kids (10/29/07)
    Halloween's right around the corner. To keep your little goblins and ghosts safe, pediatric and trauma burn experts with the University of Michigan Health System have put together a list of the top 5 to make sure the haunted house is the only thing that is scary this Halloween.

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  • New Web site makes eating better easier (10/29/07)
    dding more fruits and vegetables to your next meal is now easy thanks to a new Web site from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center that offers healthful and delicious recipes searchable by the ingredients you like.

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  • Nov. 9: 15th annual Save A Heart Celebration (10/29/07)
    On Nov. 9, U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital will host the 15th annual Save A Heart celebration. The event - which features food and wine from some of the finest local restaurants - provides funds for the young patients at the U-M Congenital Heart Center, many of whom face life-threatening heart defects.

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  • $42.9 M in medical imaging projects approved (10/25/07)
    Today, the U-M Board of Regents approved three major projects to expand UMHS medical imaging and image-guided procedures. Together with a project approved by the Regents in July, the total investment in interventional neuroradiology, MRI, CT, nuclear cardiology and breast imaging is $42.9 million.

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  • Inflammatory breast cancer more rare, more lethal (10/23/07)
    Inflammatory breast cancer represents up to 3 percent of breast cancer diagnoses in the United States, but it is a particularly aggressive form of the disease that can be fatal in a few months if untreated. The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center has opened a new clinic specifically dedicated to inflammatory breast cancer.

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  • Buckeye vs. Wolverine organ donor registry drive (10/22/07)
    Now through Nov. 16, the U-M Students for Organ Donation will host the Buckeye vs. Wolverine Challenge for Life. As part of the event, the two universities will compete off the football field to register as many new organ and tissue donors in each state’s respective registry before the big brawl at Michigan Stadium.

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  • Wolverines Against Prostate Cancer Challenge (10/22/07)
    The University of Michigan Center for Translational Pathology and The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) and have joined forces to raise $2 million to accelerate research towards developing targeted therapies for prostate cancer.

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  • Crazy justice (10/19/07)
    A Nov. 5 event at the U-M Depression Center will explore the “criminizalization” of mental illness that has taken place in the United States in recent years, due to deinstitutionalization, lack of appropriate services, rigid legal systems and other factors. A panel of speakers, including author Pete Earley and state Sen. Liz Brater, will discuss the issue involve, and possible solutions.

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  • Heart device recall info for U-M patients (10/18/07)
    The recall of a wire "lead" from implanted heart-rhythm devices affects about 500 of the 5,000 adults and children who have received such devices as part of their treatment at U-M. This announcement can help patients understand if they might be affected by the recall, and what to do if they are.

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  • Study explores med school/industry ties (10/16/07)
    The first study of ties between industry and medical school departments or department heads finds that such ties are just as common as links between individual faculty members and industry. The study's senior author is the head of the U-M Bioethics Program.

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  • U-M pediatrician, actress take part in national pertussis education campaign (10/16/07)
    Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases (PKIDs) today announced the launch of its national educational campaign “Silence the Sounds of Pertussis” with actress and new mom Keri Russell. 

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  • UMHS geriatrics researcher honored (10/16/07)
    A U-M Geriatrics Center investigator is a recipient of a new award recognizing promising research in the science of aging. Robert J. Wessells, Ph.D., is one of 25 scientists in the nation recently selected to receive an unsolicited, $50,000 Glenn Foundation Award for Research in the Biological Mechanisms of Aging. The Glenn Award will enhance Wessells’ studies of age-related deterioration of cardiac function using a fruit fly model.

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  • U-M Transplant Center receives HHS Organ Donation Medal of Honor (10/15/07)
    For the third consecutive year, the University of Michigan Health System Transplant Center has been awarded the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ distinguished Medal of Honor for its success in raising organ donation rates. U-M earned the recognition by collaborating with its Gift of Life Michigan partners to achieve the national goal of converting at least 75 percent of eligible deaths into actual organ donors.

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  • 2 UMHS researchers selected to prestigious institute (10/12/07)
    Two researchers from the Universityof Michigan Health Systemwere among the 15 top physician-scientists nationally who were appointed as Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators.

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  • Survival Flight wins national critical care competition (10/12/07)
    At the sixth annual Air Medical Transport Conference Survival Flight's Michael Chesney, RN, and David Roberts, RN, had the opportunity to showcase their medical expertise in life and death situations using patient simulator technology. Their expert poise and skill earned them the top honor for the event’s Medical Education Technologies, Inc-sponsored critical care competition.

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  • Best Doctors lists include hundreds from U-M (10/10/07)
    Hundreds of UMHS physicians are being recognized as among the best in the country, or among the best in metropolitan Detroit, by two different independent ratings.

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  • Marker predicts success of breast cancer chemotherapy (10/10/07)
    video  Researchers have found they can potentially target chemotherapy for breast cancer to only those women most likely to benefit, sparing the majority of patients from unnecessary side effects.

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  • $1.5M Towsley grant funds eye-imaging center (10/09/07)
    The U-M Kellogg Eye Center has received a $1.5 million grant from the Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation to build a state-of-the-art Ophthalmic Imaging Center within its new facility, which is scheduled to open in 2010.

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  • Researchers find new gene linked to breast cancer (10/08/07)
    Researchers in a multicenter international study have identified a new gene that, if mutated, may increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer by more than a third.

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  • Whites take supplemental breast cancer therapy more often than blacks (10/08/07)
    A new study finds that white women more frequently take more of the life-prolonging supplemental therapies used to treat breast cancer than African-American women.

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  • Early school success protects against teen and young adult drug use (10/04/07)
    Adolescents who do well in school are less likely to smoke, drink or do drugs. But which comes first: drug use or school failure?

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  • Stomach stem cell discovery could bring cancer insights (10/04/07)
    U-M researchers have for the first time identified progenitor cells in mouse stomachs in a region where cancer often begins. The ability to see and trace these cells gives a green light to efforts to understand the origins of one of the world’s most common cancers.

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  • Davenport Lecture delivers tales of hope and despair from AIDS workers (10/02/07)
    Ronald Bayer, Ph.D., and Gerald Oppenheimer, Ph.D., MPH, have compiled an oral history of how South Africa’s doctors and nurses struggle to provide care for AIDS patients in an environment of scant resources, and professional and political barriers. The pair will discuss their book at the seventh annual Davenport Lecture.

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  • Hunters: Don’t let heart trouble ruin your season! (10/01/07)
    video  Every year, an unknown number of hunters never make it back home because their hearts suffer problems brought on by the strenuous exercise and dramatic bursts of activity that hunting can bring. Fortunately, U-M experts says, hunters can take steps now to protect themselves from heart problems during the hunt – and to make sure they know what to do if a fellow hunter goes down.

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  • Pregnancy after breast cancer is possible (10/01/07)
    video  Alyssa Tushman was a new mother when she was diagnosed with stage III breast cancer. After aggressive treatment – including chemotherapy, radiation therapy, a double mastectomy and reconstructive surgery – Tushman was happy to learn from experts at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center that another baby would be possible. And today, she’s pregnant with her third child.

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  • Problems with insulin folding may lead to diabetes (10/01/07)
    A glitch in the production and folding of molecules deep within the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas may be responsible for the death of those cells and the onset of diabetes, new animal research suggests.

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  • Record number of kids expected to get flu vaccine this year (10/01/07)
    video  According to results from the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health, 65 percent of parents plan to have their children, ages 6 months to 5 years, vaccinated against the flu this season. The U-M poll also finds that parents more likely to vaccinate their kids if they plan to vaccinate themselves against the flu.

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  • The latest in breast cancer research and care (10/01/07)
    As October marks Breast Cancer Awareness Month, here are some of the hot topics in breast cancer research and patient care from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Winner named in Up to Bat with Inges contest (10/01/07)
    After a week of online voting, 7-year-old Jake Krzyzaniak of Adrian has been named the winner of the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital’s “Up to Bat with the Inges” room-naming contest.

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September 2007

  • Free depression screenings Oct. 10 (09/28/07)
    On the evening of Wednesday, Oct. 10, the University of Michigan Depression Center will offer members of the community a free opportunity to find out if they might have depression, and to volunteer for research studies.

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  • MVN announces flu shot clinics (09/28/07)
    Clinics will be offered throughout the area. Flu shots are $33 this year, and pneumonia shots will be offered for $84. Payment options include cash, check and credit card, as well as Blue Care Network, CareChoices, Health Alliance Plan, M-Care, Medicare Part B and Priority Health, all of which cover the entire cost of the flu shot.

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  • Oct. 10 lecture on steroids & other sports-ethics issues (09/28/07)
    On Wednesday, October 10, Thomas H. Murray, Ph.D., a noted medical ethics expert will speak at the U-M Health System on steroids & other sports-ethics issues.

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  • Local events teach kids how to be safe pedestrians (09/27/07)
    As part of International Walk to School Day - observed Oct. 3 and Oct. 4 - the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital Pediatric Trauma Program has partnered with Safe Kids Washtenaw County and FedEx volunteers to lead local activities that will teach kids how to be safe pedestrians.

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  • Candle lighting event remembers those who have died (09/27/07)
    The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center will hold its 10th annual Candle Lighting for Hope and Remembrance on Saturday, Oct. 6. The ceremony is designed to celebrate the lives of those who have died and bring hope to their families and loved ones.

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  • Why don't painkillers work for people with fibromyalgia? (09/27/07)
    People who have the common chronic pain condition fibromyalgia often report that they don’t respond to the types of medication that relieve other people’s pain. New research from the University of Michigan Health System helps to explain why that might be: Patients with fibromyalgia were found to have reduced binding ability of a type of receptor in the brain that is the target of opioid painkiller drugs such as morphine.

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  • $22M Taubman gift creates new research institute (09/26/07)
    A new and extraordinary $22 million gift to UMHS from retail pioneer A. Alfred Taubman is making possible a new and extraordinary institute - one with a mission of supporting fundamental research to advance the understanding of the causes, treatment and prevention of human diseases.

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  • U-M launches vehicle crash study (09/26/07)
    The University of Michigan Medical School, General Motors and OnStar have launched a study that collects crash and injury data. The information could guide emergency responders and doctors who treat auto crash victims, and help to engineer safer cars and trucks. Stewart Wang, M.D., Ph.D., professor of surgery and director, U-M Program for Injury Research and Education, is leading the study.

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  • Domestic violence, depression predictors of low birth weight infants among low-income mothers (09/25/07)
    Low-income women with mental health problems and a history of domestic abuse were 12 times as likely to give birth to a low birth weight child, a new University of Michigan and University of Pittsburgh study shows.

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  • Studies: Children obese due to a host of unhealthy pressures (09/25/07)
    Unhealthy options and pressures influence nearly every part of children's daily lives, according to studies released this week in a special supplement of the American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

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  • Blacks, Latinos still lag in diabetes control, U-M/VA study finds (09/24/07)
    video  Despite decades of advances in diabetes care, African Americans and Latinos are still far less likely than whites to have their blood sugar under control, even with the help of medications, a new national study by U-M and VA researchers finds. That puts them at a much higher risk of blindness, heart attack, kidney failure and other long-term diabetes complications.

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  • UMHS holds Nursing Career Fair Oct. 21 (09/24/07)
    The University of Michigan Nursing Career Fair, to be held on Oct. 21, will showcase the range of careers possible for nurses at the U-M Health System. The event runs from noon to 3 p.m., with tours at 1 p.m. and 2 p.m.

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  • Dine at Charlie's to raise funds for Urology (09/20/07)
    Charlie’s La Shish Restaurant in Ann Arbor - soon to be Charlie’s Mediterranean Cuisine - is sponsoring a benefit to support Urologic Cancer Research at the U-M Department of Urology. This third-annual fund-raiser will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 23, and 100 percent of the restaurant’s proceeds for the day will go toward urology research at U-M.

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  • Cancer patients, spouses report similar emotional distress (09/20/07)
    A cancer diagnosis affects more than just the patient. A new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds spouses report similar physical and emotional quality of life as the patient.

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  • Parents' participation in medical decisions linked to self-efficacy (09/20/07)
    In a new study published in the Journal of Pediatrics, 86 percent of parents report that they participate in decisions made about their hospitalized child’s medical care. Researchers found that parents who feel confident communicating with physicians - as well as those parents whose child has been previously hospitalized - are more likely to participate in medical decisions.

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  • Vote for "Up to Bat with Inges" winner (09/20/07)
    Detroit Tigers third baseman Brandon Inge and wife Shani have narrowed the playing field to five finalists. And now they need your help to choose the MVP of the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Women’s Hospital “Up to Bat with the Inges” room-naming contest.

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  • National patient safety award for Dr. Campbell (09/19/07)
    For nearly a decade, Darrell A. Campbell, Jr., has worked to make surgery a safer experience for patients around the country, and spearheaded a broad patient-safety and quality-improvement campaign at UMHS. Now, he has been recognized on a national level for this work, with an Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Award.

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  • University of Michigan receives $55 million NIH grant (09/19/07)
    National Institutes of Health Director Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., has announced that the University of Michigan will receive a $55 million Clinical and Translational Science Award. The CTSAs are part of a national initiative to encourage and speed collaboration and interdisciplinary research for therapies that improve human health. The announcement places U-M with 23 other academic medical centers around the country who are members of an expanding national CTSA consortium.

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  • U-M Back and Pain Center opens (09/18/07)
    The Center for Interventional Pain Medicine at the University of Michigan Health System now has a new name and new physicians who specialize in headache treatment, the management of pain medications, and beginning later this fall, acupuncture. Now known as the University of Michigan Back and Pain Center, the clinic also will move in early 2008 to a new location, from the Med Inn building in the main UMHS medical campus to the Burlington Building at 325 East Eisenhower Parkway.

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  • Generic prostate drug helps find high-risk cancers early (09/12/07)
    Finasteride, a well-known generic drug that shrinks an enlarged prostate, also reduces men’s risk of getting prostate cancer. A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute strongly suggests finasteride also increases the chances that physicians will find fast-growing prostate cancers early. The study comes from the Southwest Oncology Group, a large clinical trials network headquartered at the U-M.

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  • Men's Event for prostate cancer is Sept. 25 (09/11/07)
    The Sixth Annual Men’s Event to benefit prostate cancer research and education at the Universityof Michiganwill be held Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2007, at the new Fleming’s Steak House & Wine Bar at 323 North Old Woodward Ave.in Birmingham. This event provides philanthropic support for the U-M Prostate Cancer Research Program.

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  • University Research Corridor creates 68,803 Michigan jobs (09/10/07)
    Urging lawmakers to "invest in what works for Michigan," the University Research Corridor presidents today released an independent analysis showing the state's three research universities helped create 68,803 Michigan jobs and produced $12.8 billion of net economic benefit in 2006.

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  • 3 free car seat inspections scheduled (09/07/07)
    Safe Kids Washtenaw Country and the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital’s Buckle Up! program are partnering this fall to host three free community car seat checks. These events are designed to increase awareness and proper use of car seats. When used correctly, car seats are one of the most important child safety tools.

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  • Black women more likely to have aggressive breast cancer (09/07/07)
    A large analysis of racial differences in rates of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer finds that black women in the United Statesare more likely than white women to have breast tumors that are ER-negative, researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center report.

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  • U-M study indicates frail elders vulnerable to mental health problems (09/07/07)
    Meals and personal care services are often brought to frail elders living at home, but a University of Michigan researcher says mental health care should be delivered, too.

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  • Sept. 24: Blood, bone marrow, organ donor drive (09/06/07)
    The U-M Comprehensive Pediatric Sickle Cell Program and the Ann Arbor Community Center, along with the American Red Cross, will host a community blood, bone marrow and organ donor drive to commemorate Sickle Cell Awareness Month. The event will take place from 1 - 7 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 24, at the Ann Arbor Community Center.

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  • Women stopping breast cancer drug because of side effects (09/06/07)
    More than 10 percent of women with breast cancer stopped taking a commonly prescribed drug because of joint and muscle pain, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Enzyme alerts cell's powerful army to repair DNA damage (09/05/07)
    University of Michigan researchers have come up with a new paradigm for how cells protect themselves from cancer-producing damage to DNA. Understanding the role of a powerful detection enzyme sheds valuable light on what goes wrong in cancer.

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  • Ovarian cancer: The not-so-silent killer (09/05/07)
    Advocates and researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center hope Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, which is September, will get people talking about ovarian cancer. What’s there to say? Start with these eight things you need to know.

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  • African-American men and prostate cancer: Higher risk and understudied (09/04/07)
    video  African-American men face a higher risk of developing prostate cancer in their lifetime, but researchers do not fully understand why. But researchers at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center are dedicated to changing that, and are focused on learning what genetic factors lead to this disparity for prostate cancer.

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  • Are cleanlier lifestyles causing more allergies for kids? (09/04/07)
    video  In today’s super-clean world, vaccinations, anti-bacterial soaps, and airtight doors and windows are keeping dirt and disease-causing germs at bay. While staying germ-free can prevent the spread of disease and infections, U-M experts say our cleanlier lifestyle may be responsible for an increase in allergies among children. .

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  • Crossing the line between tired and fatigued (09/04/07)
    video  Is feeling tired all day normal? When does fatigue turn into a health concern? U-M experts say poor sleep habits, stress and illness can trigger debilitating fatigue. Fortunately, treatments including acupuncture, physical therapy, dietary changes, increased exercise, meditation, and getting enough sleep, can help.

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  • The power of fruit juice (09/04/07)
    video  U-M experts say that many fruit juices provide powerful health benefits. In fact, recent research has identified ways that beverages such as pomegranate, orange and cranberry juices can help to prevent or cure diseases.

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August 2007

  • Heart device helps transplant candidates survive, thrive (08/30/07)
    A new generation of implanted heart-assisting pump does very well at helping severely ill heart-failure patients survive, and thrive, until they receive a heart transplant, according to a new study led by U-M Cardiovascular Center experts. The device, called HeartMate II, also helped patients’ original hearts regain function and allowed their other organs to heal by restoring blood flow.

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  • U-M researchers dispute widely held ideas about stem cells (08/29/07)
    How do adult stem cells protect themselves from accumulating genetic mutations that can lead to cancer?

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  • New “M GO BLUE for Mott” rally scarves (08/27/07)
    Whether you decide to wear it or wave it, U-M coaches Lloyd Carr, Red Berenson and John Beilein say the new “M GO BLUE for Mott” rally scarf is sure to become a staple at every Wolverine athletic home game. The 60-inch maize and blue scarves will make their debut at Michigan Stadium, beginning with Michigan's first home football game on Sept. 1. The scarves are $10, with a portion of the proceeds going to the U-M C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Women’s Hospital fund-raising campaign.

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  • Mott only children’s hospital in state to make U.S. News' "best" list (08/24/07)
    The University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital ranks among the best pediatric hospitals in the nation and is the only children’s hospital in Michigan to make U.S. News & World Report’s first stand-alone “America’s Best Children’s Hospitals” list. C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital ranks 22 on the magazine’s list of the 30 best pediatric facilities in the United States.

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  • Small bits of “junk” RNA aid master tumor-suppressor gene (08/23/07)
    A University of Michigan study reveals that the p53 gene, a key protector mutated in half of all cancers, gets help from a trio of little-known micro RNA genes. Drugs that mimic their benefits could become important tools in cancer therapy someday.

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  • Event marks milestone in children's, women's building project (08/21/07)
    On Wednesday, Aug. 22, the U-M Health System will mark yet another milestone in its new $523 million children's hospital and women's hospital building project: The construction of tallest free-standing crane in North America. At a special event, young patients will not only celebrate the erection of the 300-foot crane, but also the flag that flies atop it that was created by a local 2-year-old patient.

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  • More than half of American support S-CHIP for low-income families (08/20/07)
    More than half of Americans support the State Children's Health Insurance Program, or S-CHIP, for uninsured families who earn an annual income of up to $32,000, according to the latest report from the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. The report also found that two of every three adults also would support government-sponsored health coverage for children in families with incomes as high as $48,500.

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  • $6M grant to fund research on prolapse, incontinence (08/16/07)
    A group of researchers from the University of Michigan Health System has been awarded a $6 million federal grant to study the serious injuries that afflict millions of women as a result of childbirth. More than 300,000 women require surgery each year for problems such as incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse that arise from injuries sustained during vaginal birth.

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  • Anthrax vaccine uses nanoparticles to produce immunity (08/16/07)
    A nasal vaccine shows strong promise in initial animal studies conducted by U-M researchers at the Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and the Biological Sciences. After further studies in animals and people, the result could be a better anthrax vaccine that requires no shots, is effective with only one or two immunizations, needs no refrigeration and could be used effectively after a bioterrorism attack to boost immune response in exposed people.

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  • Are drunk girls more promiscuous? Perception is not always reality (08/16/07)
    Teens' perceptions of adolescent girls' flirtatiousness is based on what girls are drinking, as well as what their romantic male partners are drinking, according to a new University of Michigan study.

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  • U-M oncologist wins inaugural breast cancer award (08/16/07)
    The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the ASCO Foundation announced U-M's Daniel F. Hayes, M.D., is the winner of the inaugural Gianni Bonadonna Breast Cancer Award. The award recognizes an active clinical or translational researcher with a distinguished record of accomplishments in advancing the field of breast cancer.

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  • Heart-healthy event for hunters, Aug. 25-26 at Cabela's (08/15/07)
    In just a few weeks, the first of Michigan's hunting seasons will begin, so hunters should start getting their hearts in shape now, U-M Cardiovascular Center experts say. They offer tips for hunters and, on Aug. 25 and 26 at Cabela's outfitters in Dundee, they'll offer free screenings and information at the first-ever Heart of the Hunter Health Fair.

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  • A heart pioneer: Total artificial heart patient nears first anniversary (08/13/07)
    A year ago, 42-year-old Phillip Hall was facing near-certain death, perhaps within weeks. But today, he's about to celebrate his birthday, his tenth wedding anniversary - and the one-year anniversary of the day he was rushed into a U-M operating room and implanted with a temporary total artificial heart that saved his life.

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  • New newborn screening technology revives old controversies (08/13/07)
    New technology has increased the ability to detect genetic diseases in newborns, but it also has rekindled much of the debate that has plagued newborn screening for more than 40 years. In a published paper, a U-M pediatrician outlines the controversies surrounding newborn screening, and provides insight into the issues that must be addressed for the continued success of this public health screening program.

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  • Most seniors now have drug coverage, U-M study shows (08/09/07)
    More than 90 percent of Americans age 65 and older now have prescription drug coverage, compared to more than 75 percent who were covered in 2004, according to a University of Michigan analysis. And poor seniors are as likely to have coverage as the rich.

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  • U-M emergency research enters new phase (08/09/07)
    For patients who suffer strokes, heart attacks, seizures, trauma and other medical emergencies, the treatment they receive in the first minutes can be a matter of life and death. But discovering new and better treatments for these emergencies can be difficult. Now, U-M has embarked on a new phase of advanced research in emergency medical care.

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  • Reasons, remedies for underinsurance for childhood vaccines (08/07/07)
    In an editorial appearing in the Aug. 8 issue of JAMA, U-M pediatrician Matthew Davis, M.D., explains the reasons why many privately insured children are not covered for recommended vaccines. He also offers remedies to increase child and adolescent vaccinations by making national vaccine priorities explicit and consistent across the country.

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  • U-M study supports value of quarantines to lessen effects of flu pandemics (08/07/07)
    In a study published in the Aug. 8 Journal of the American Medical Association, a team of University of Michigan medical historians and epidemiologists from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that social restrictions allowed 43 U.S. cities to save thousands of lives during the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918-1919.

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  • Detecting small movements during cancer treatment (08/07/07)
    Radiation for cancer treatment involves targeting intense beams in a very precise fashion to a relatively small area. But despite efforts to align a patient beforehand, a cough, a wiggle, a deep breath or any other number of small movements could dramatically alter where the treatment is being delivered. To help eliminate the error associated with treating a moving target, the University of Michigan's Radiation Oncology department has begun using a new system designed to detect in real time the location of a tumor.

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  • Geriatric health conditions have major effect on half of all seniors (08/07/07)
    A broad study of adults ages 65 and older has found that half of them have one or more conditions that can affect their ability to participate in activities of daily living, such as bathing and dressing on their own.

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  • 5 things to know about the HPV vaccine (08/06/07)
    video  Millions are parents are struggling to decide if the HPV vaccine is right for their child. To help, a University of Michigan pediatrician looks into the fact and fiction of this controversial vaccine, and offers parents some advice and guidelines.

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  • A parent's guide to understanding tonsils and strep (08/06/07)
    video  When is a tonsillectomy the right choice for your child? And, why are some children more prone to chronic throat infections? To help answer those questions, a U-M Health System expert offers parents a seven-step guide to better understand tonsils, tonsillitis, strep and tonsillectomies before the start of the school year.

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  • Back-to-school season can be tough on kids with asthma (08/06/07)
    video  Many of the 9 million children in this country who have asthma need more than just pencils and notepads when they return to the classroom each fall. According to U-M pediatric allergy specialists, these children require easy access to their inhalers and other medications, and the awareness of teacher and school officials about their condition.

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  • Living with dangerous food allergies: A safe place to learn the boundaries (08/06/07)
    video  Testing children with serious food allergies can be an extremely stressful and even dangerous situation. These concerns have prompted the U-M Health System to create an innovative Food Allergy Clinic that offers families a safe and relaxing facility to test or challenge for food allergies.

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  • Study finds heart attack treatment lacking (08/03/07)
    Far more of today's heart attack patients receive emergency angioplasty treatment or clot-busting drugs to re-open their clogged heart arteries than even a decade ago, a new U-M/Yale study finds. But 10 percent of patients who could benefit from this urgent treatment - which is known to save lives and prevent lasting damage to the heart muscle - don't get it at all, the study shows.

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  • U-M lab receives grant to prep artificial lung for clinical trial (08/03/07)
    The U-M Medical School laboratory working to develop an implantable artificial lung that can serve as a bridge to lung transplantation is entering the home stretch. Thanks to a new $5 million, five year grant from the National Institutes of Health designed to fund animal studies that will move the prototype through the final details of readiness for patients, a small clinical trial of the artificial lung may be just three years away.

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  • Marianne Udow will direct UMHS/BCBSM joint venture (08/01/07)
    The board of directors of the Center for Healthcare Quality & Transformation -- a joint venture between the U-M Health System and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan created as part of the sale of M-CARE -- has named Marianne Udow as the organization's first director. The joint venture is dedicated to improving the quality of Michigan's health care, and transforming the way patient care is delivered in the state and beyond.

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  • Researchers find 'on switches' that cause prostate cancer (08/01/07)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered how genes turn on the switch that leads to prostate cancer. The team discovered that pieces of two chromosomes can trade places with each other and cause two genes to fuse together. The fused genes then override the "off" switch that keeps cells from growing uncontrollably, causing prostate cancer to develop.

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July 2007

  • Service project empowers kids in U-M's NeuroRehab program (07/31/07)
    The University of Michigan Health System's NeuroRehabilitation summer program is taking part in a service project aimed at empowering kids with disabilities while helping kids in Africa. The project includes a study skills group that puts together boxes of school supplies to be sent to Kijabe Hospital in Kenya, a creative writing group that writes letters to the recipients of the packages and a newspaper group that puts out a newspaper about Africa based on their research.

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  • Taming the anthrax threat (07/31/07)
    U-M scientists have done the first complete analysis of genes active in the anthrax microbe as it invades the lungs. The work should pave the way for better drugs in the event of an attack.

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  • Second Chance at Life event is Aug. 11 (07/30/07)
    On Saturday, Aug. 11, the University of Michigan Transplant Center will host the seventh annual Second Chance at Life event from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hines Park in Westland to promote organ donation.

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  • U-M nanotech team to study better pain relief in battle zones (07/30/07)
    With a $1.3 million defense grant, a large interdisciplinary team of University of Michigan scientists will create and test nanoparticles that may be able to deliver morphine to wounded soldiers faster and avoid the drug's tendency to suppress breathing.

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  • Alzheimer's patients sought for fish oil study (07/27/07)
    Every day, millions of Americans take fish oil, hoping that the omega-3 fatty acids inside will protect their brains against memory loss and dementia. But no one knows for sure whether it really works. That's why a new national study has been launched at 51 sites, including UMHS, to test the effects of omega-3s in people with a high immediate risk of brain decline: those in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

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  • Researchers ID gene involved in breast cancer (07/26/07)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a gene linked to the development of an aggressive form of breast cancer.

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  • Study points to new way to predict risk from torn aorta (07/26/07)
    Each year, thousands of Americans suffer a sudden tear in the body's largest blood vessel, the aorta. It's often misdiagnosed, can kill if not treated immediately, and survivors face a high and unpredictable risk of dying. Now, a new U-M-led study points to a new way to predict which patients are most at risk, and introduces a new model to explain why.

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  • U-M team identifies gene that regulates blood-forming fetal stem cells (07/26/07)
    In the rancorous public debate over federal research funding, stem cells are generally assigned to one of two categories: embryonic or adult. But that's a false dichotomy and an oversimplification. A new University of Michigan study adds to mounting evidence that stem cells in the developing fetus are distinct from both embryonic and adult stem cells.

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  • UMHS named one of 2007 "Most Wireless" (07/26/07)
    UMHS has been named to the list of the nation's Most Wireless hospitals, according to the results of the 2007 Most Wired Survey and Benchmarking Study. The study was released in the July issue of Hospitals & Health Networks magazine.

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  • Patterns of work and welfare linked to children's behavior problems, lower test scores (07/20/07)
    Among mothers who left welfare for work, older children score lower on math and reading tests than their peers, a new study from the University of Michigan indicates.

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  • UMHHC ends 2007 with 3.9% operating margin (07/20/07)
    The University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers have finished fiscal year 2007 with a positive operating margin, marking the 11th straight year in the black.

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  • PET scans track lung cancer treatment (07/19/07)
    Lung cancer patients may not need to wait till their radiation treatment is over to know if it worked. A PET scan several weeks after starting radiation treatment for lung cancer can indicate whether the tumor will respond to the treatment, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Great expectations: U-M study looks at placebo effect (07/18/07)
    Why do some people experience a "placebo effect" that makes them feel better when they receive a sham treatment they believe to be real - while other people don't respond at all? A new study from the U-M Health System may help explain why.

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  • Art fair goers get a glimpse of science (07/17/07)
    Scientists at the U-M Center for Organogenesis are back this year with eye-catching photos of the luminous cells they see through their microscopes. At Booth 145 at the South University Art Fair, fair goers find large prints and note cards of mouse, fly, worm and human cells. There's also the chance to talk about science issues in the news.

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  • U-M again named among nation's best hospitals by U.S.News & World Report (07/13/07)
    The U-M Hospitals and Health Centers once again has earned a place among the best hospitals in the nation, according to rankings compiled by U.S.News & World Report. In its 12th straight year of making the upper echelon of the magazine's honor roll of "America's Best Hospitals," U-M comes in at 14th among the top 18. No other Michigan hospitals made the honor roll, which signifies across-the-board excellence in multiple medical specialties.

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  • UMHS shows that improving quality, coordination of care can cut Medicare costs (07/11/07)
    In just the first year of a special effort organized by the federal agency that runs the Medicare system, the University of Michigan Health System was able to significantly improve both the quality and efficiency of care that Medicare beneficiaries received at its hospitals and health centers, while also saving the Medicare system millions of dollars.

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  • Bacteria suggest new approach to Alzheimer's therapy (07/09/07)
    New insights into how bacteria form fibers called curli offer intriguing clues to the formation of harmful protein tangles in diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's, University of Michigan researchers report. Their results will be published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences during the week of July 9-13.

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  • Major advance in colon cancer genetics (07/09/07)
    An international team of researchers is reporting on a 10-year study of colon cancer among Israeli Jews and Arabs. The researchers, led by a team from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, discovered a genetic marker that increased a person's risk of colon cancer by 23 percent. At the same time, three other research teams are reporting similar findings involving the same gene, strengthening the likelihood that this particular marker plays a role in colon cancer.

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  • New 'asthma gene' could lead to new therapies (07/05/07)
    A gene that is strongly associated with a risk of developing childhood onset asthma was identified by an international team of scientists, whose findings are published today in the journal Nature.

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  • Sarcoma Stroll set for July 7 (07/05/07)
    The University of Michigan Team Sarcoma Stroll, which begins at 10 a.m.July 7, is designed to raise awareness of sarcoma, a cancer of the connective tisse, and money to fund research. The event will feature a 1K to 5K stroll around central campus.

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  • Detroit Tiger Inge hosts contest to benefit new C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital (07/03/07)
    Detroit Tiger third baseman Brandon Inge and wife Shani want the community to step up to the plate and hit a home run for the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital.

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  • Video game play among teens affects school work, not socializing (07/03/07)
    Kids who spend a lot of time playing video games are finding time to socialize with friends too -- though thats not the case when it comes to doing homework.

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  • Camp creates summer memories for kids with special needs (07/02/07)
    video  It's every kid's summer dream to climb and swing from trees, go fishing, play outdoors, take boat rides, and have slumber parties with friends. While those dreams may seem impossible for children with disabilities, a very special camp called Trails Edge Camp has been them a reality for more than 25 years.

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  • Control acid reflux to prevent esophageal cancer (07/02/07)
    video  Esophageal cancer rates are on the rise and the increase may be due to the rise in obesity. Fortunately, U-M experts have rediscovered a procedure thats helping many patients battle this often silent form of cancer.

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  • Dont get burned this summer! (07/02/07)
    video  As the summer weather heats up, there are many ways to get burned. To help you stay safe this summer, a U-M expert offers tips avoid some of the more common summer burns, including those from the sun and fireworks.

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  • Invisible ink: The removal of unwanted tattoos (07/02/07)
    video  Behind every tattoo is a story. But for a growing number of people, the story behind their tattoo is something theyd like to erase like the tattoo itself. While laser technology is making it easier to remove most tattoos, it can still be a painful and costly process.

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  • New program helps patients transition from hospital (07/02/07)
    A new program launched by the University of Michigan Geriatrics Center is helping patients transition from the hospital into skilled care settings quicker and with fewer complications than before. The unique program provides seamless, high-level care through hospital discharge to less intensive-or sub-acute-care facilities.

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June 2007

  • University of Michigan offers new Japanese health podcast (06/28/07)
    UMHS has launched its first Japanese language podcast. "Dr. Jimbo's Japanese Health Podcast" focuses on contemporary health issue pertinent to Japanese living in the U.S. and around the world, hosted by Masahito Jimbo, M.D.

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  • Prechter lecture on bipolar genetics July 13 (06/27/07)
    Around the globe, scientists are hunting for the specific genes that make millions of people vulnerable to the highs and lows of bipolar disorder. On July 13, the U-M Depression Center will offer the public an update on that gene hunt, with the first-ever Heinz C. Prechter Bipolar Research Fund Lecture.

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  • U-M bioethicist named to AMA panel (06/27/07)
    For seven years, Dr. Susan Goold has headed the U-M Bioethics Program. This past weekend, she was named to one of the nations preeminent ethics panels: the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association.

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  • U-M effort tackles nursing shortage, reaching out to state (06/27/07)
    A University of Michigan initiative is tackling the nation's nursing shortage by reaching out to discouraged nurses and the large number who left the profession without considering a host of other uses for their nursing skills.

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  • Clinical Simulation Center earns distinguished endorsement (06/26/07)
    The University of Michigan Medical Schools Clinical Simulation Center has been awarded accreditation as a Level 1 Comprehensive Education Institute by the American College of Surgeons. This is the highest level of accreditation and is only awarded to those institutions that offer state-of-the-art surgical education to surgeons, surgical residents and members of surgical teams.

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  • Survival Flight nurse receives AAMS Crew Member of the Year award (06/26/07)
    Paul Mazurek, RN, flight nurse specialist with the University of Michigan Health Systems Survival Flight team, has been named the 2007 Crew Member of the Year by the Association of Air Medical Services. The award recognizes an individual that has made significant contributions to enhance the development or promotion of improved patient care in the emergency medical transport community.

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  • Students with symptoms of mental illness often don't seek help (06/25/07)
    Studies show that the incidence of mental illness on college campuses is rising, and a new survey of 2,785 college students indicates that more than half of students with significant symptoms of anxiety or depression do not seek help.

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  • University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center receives gift of $50 million (06/25/07)
    Today, the U-M Health System announces that it has received an extraordinary gift of $50 million to recognize and encourage the Centers innovative model of caring for people with cardiovascular disease.

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  • Gene discovery aids understanding of common inherited neurological disorder (06/20/07)
    U-M scientists have discovered the gene mutation that causes one subtype of Charcot Marie Tooth disorder, a common inherited neurological condition.Thanks to a randomly appearing strain of "pale tremor" lab mice, the multi-university research team was rapidly able to track down the gene responsible for similar disability in people. The work, published online in the Journal Nature, paves the way for future genetic tests and later on, possible treatments for a small percentage of people with the disorder, which causes leg pain, muscle weakness and foot deformities.

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  • U-M poll: Parents support genetic testing, DNA biobanks (06/20/07)
    How do parents really feel about testing their child's DNA for diseases that may not have an effective treatment, and how willing are they to store their child's DNA in a government biobank to help yield new strategies for disease treatment and prevention in the future? The latest C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health finds that 54 percent of adults endorse genetic testing even for diseases with no effective treatments. Further, 38 percent of parents are willing to have their child's DNA stored in a government biobank for research purposes.

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  • July 9 golf outing to benefit Camp Michitanki (06/19/07)
    On Monday, July 9, the University of Michigan Transplant Center will host the Camp Michitanki Golf Classic at the Polo Fields Golf and Country Club of Ann Arbor. NHL referee Dan OHalloran will be the official Master of Ceremonies for event.

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  • Football experience to benefit prostate cancer resesarch (06/14/07)
    The University of Michigan Men's Fantasy Football Experience, a two-day event championed by Michigan Football Coach Lloyd Carr, will benefit the "Men of Michigan" Prostate Cancer Research Fund. This second annual fund-raiser, on Aug. 2-3, will help to advance awareness, research and treatment of prostate cancer, while giving participants a truly unique insider's perspective on Michigan Wolverine Football.

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  • Pill-splitting study looks at cost-saving step (06/12/07)
    Slicing certain pills in half could slice a hefty amount off of Americas prescription drug costs, including costs for millions of people who take popular cholesterol-lowering drugs. Now, a new U-M study adds more evidence that the practice can be used safely and effectively -- and that pill-splitting patients want to share in the cost savings.

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  • Tigers, Mott, baseball, children's health night (06/12/07)
    On Aug. 8, join the American League Champion Detroit Tigers as they take on the Tampa Bay Devil Rays for C.S. Mott Childrens Health Night. For this special event, a portion of tickets sales will benefit the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital and Womens Hospital.

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  • UMHS lung transplant patient recovering from surgery (06/08/07)
    At the end of what University of Michigan Health System staff members have said is among the most tragic weeks in UMHS history, there was a glimmer of hope for the future. This morning, the patient who was unable to receive a double-lung transplant when the plane carrying his organs crashed into Lake Michigan is recovering in University Hospital after being transplanted with a second set of lungs. He could be back home in several weeks.

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  • A wider range of sounds for the deaf (06/07/07)
    A tiny electrode array placed directly in the auditory nerve could overcome limitations of todays widely used cochlear implants, initial U-M research in animals suggests. Such a device would allow deaf people to hear low-pitched sounds typical in speech, converse in a noisy room and enjoy a symphony.

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  • Gene switched off in cancer can be turned on (06/06/07)
    A gene implicated in the development of cancer cells can be switched on using drugs, report researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. The finding could lead to a new class of targeted cancer therapies with potential to benefit many different cancer types.

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  • Can a Mediterranean diet prevent colon cancer? (06/05/07)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center are beginning a study to look at whether diet can impact a persons risk of developing colon cancer. Specifically, the researchers will compare a Mediterranean diet high in olive oil, nuts and fish with a standard healthy eating plan.

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  • Survival Flight air ambulance crashes into Lake Michigan; search for survivors continues (06/05/07)
    At approximately 5:50 p.m. ET today, the University of Michigan Health System was notified that a Cessna jet leased by its U-M Survival Flight air ambulance program had crashed into Lake Michigan.

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  • Lymphoma drug effective over long term (06/04/07)
    Eight years after being treated with a new drug for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 86 percent of patients were still alive and half had not had a relapse of their disease, according to researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Celebrate cancer survivors on June 10 (06/04/07)
    The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center will host its annual Cancer Survivors Day celebration on Sunday, June 10 at Washtenaw Community College. Cancer Survivors Day is a national event which began in 1987 as a way of inspiring current cancer patients and showing the world that life after a cancer diagnosis is possible.

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  • 7 ways for kids to have a slimmer summer (06/01/07)
    video  This might be the first generation of children who do not outlive their parents because of health problems related to childhood overweight and obesity. But parents can take action now to help prevent the early onset of these diseases. And, U-M experts say, summer is an excellent time to make some healthy lifestyle changes that will benefit kids and the entire family.

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  • Advanced imaging technique allows for more accurate neurosurgery (06/01/07)
    video  The U-M Health System is taking brain imaging to the molecular level, allowing doctors to image more than the brain to image the mind. These advanced images are being used to better plan brain surgeries in order to help avoid critical structures and brain connections that could have a devastating impact on the patient.

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  • Agent slows aging in mice (06/01/07)
    Early results from a study at the U-M and two other research centers show mice live longer when fed an anti-inflammatory substance found in the creosote bush. The agent extended median lifespan. If it allows the mice to live beyond their maximum expected lifespan, it holds promise as a possible human anti-aging drug.

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  • Fibromyalgia: The misunderstood disease (06/01/07)
    video  Ongoing research at the University of Michigan is demonstrating that fibromyalgia may affect millions of Americans, and research using sophisticated imaging techniques is helping the medical community better understand this disease.

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  • Kiwanis hosts gift card shower for Mott (06/01/07)
    On Monday, June 18, the Kiwanis Club of Ann Arbor will host a special event - a gift card shower - to collect gift cards for the patients and families at the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital. The event will be held from noon to 1:15 p.m. at the Kiwanis Activity Center at 200 S. First St. in Ann Arbor.

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  • Stay hydrated this summer to prevent painful kidney stones (06/01/07)
    video  Throughout the year, but particularly in the summer, drinking enough water is the most important step people can take toward preventing the development of kidney stones. To help prevent the pain of kidney stones, a U-M urologist offers seven tips to help reduce your risk, and explains the techniques and medications available to treat those who develop kidney stones.

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  • U-M Cardiovascular Center opens June 11 (06/01/07)
    video  A grand-opening celebration will be held on June 7 for the new U-M Cardiovascular Center building, and it will open to patients on June 11. The new building will provide one-stop access to most of the Universitys adult heart and vascular care and allow U-M specialists from different disciplines to work together as never before.

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May 2007

  • June 9: Carr's Wash for Kids event (05/30/07)
    On Saturday, June 9, University of Michigan Head Football Coach Lloyd Carr and the Wolverine football program will be out in front of Michigan Stadium armed with buckets of suds and hoses to wash cars to benefit the Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Unit in the new U-M C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital and Womens Hospital. The event will be open to the public from 12:30 to 2 p.m.

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  • Study: Who claims to be a pediatrician? (05/30/07)
    A news study from researchers at U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital may leave some parents wondering how well they know their child's pediatrician. The study found that as many as 17 percent of physicians in a single state who claim to be pediatricians on state licensure files have never been board certified as a pediatrician by the American Board of Pediatrics. And another 12 percent of physicians who report to be pediatricians did not complete a medical residency training program in pediatrics.

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  • U-M football takes over Ann Arbor radio on June 7 (05/30/07)
    On Thursday, June 7, the University of Michigan football program will take over Ann Arbor Radio's four stations - WTKA 1050 AM, 107one, W4 Country, and WLBY - to benefit the new C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and Women's Hospital. The radio-a-thon also will broadcast statewide from 3-7 p.m. on "The Huge Show".

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  • Woolliscroft named Medical School dean (05/29/07)
    James O. Woolliscroft, M.D., has been selected as dean of the University of Michigan Medical School, pending approval by the U-M Board of Regents at its June meeting. The five-year appointment is effective July 1.

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  • Researcher wins award for up-and-coming women scientists (05/24/07)
    University of Michigan neuroscientist Sarah M. Clinton is one of five female scientists picked by L'Oreal USA for its annual Fellowships for Women in Science awards. Clinton, a research fellow at the U-M Mental Health Research Institute, will receive $40,000 for independent scientific research. The award-winners also have access to professional development workshops with female corporate, academic and government leaders to help them advance their careers.

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  • $5M gift will attack Lou Gehrig's disease (05/23/07)
    Twenty years ago, retail pioneer and philanthropist A. Alfred Taubman lost a good friend to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - a horrifying fatal disease thats better known as Lou Gehrigs disease or ALS. Today, that memory has motivated him to support ALS research at the U-M Medical School, with a $5 million gift that adds to $2 million he has already given.

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  • Majority of U.S. parents not in favor of HPV vaccine mandates (05/22/07)
    According to a new report released today by the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital National Poll on Childrens Health, the majority of U.S. parents do not support school mandates for Gardasil, a vaccine designed to provide protection against human papillomavirus, or HPV, the virus linked to cervical cancer and genital warts. In fact, only 44 percent of parents are in favor of a school mandate for the HPV vaccine.

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  • Retinol reduces fine wrinkles caused by natural aging (05/21/07)
    Lotions containing retinol improve the appearance of skin that has become wrinkled through the normal aging process, not just skin that has been damaged by exposure to the sun, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • To control blood pressure, drug combo may be best (05/21/07)
    Single-tablet combinations of drugs may be what it takes to get blood pressure under control, even in people with moderate hypertension, according to results from a new international study involving more than 10,700 people with high blood pressure and led by a U-M professor.

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  • Dramatic health benefits after just one exercise session (05/18/07)
    video  New research shows that just one session of exercise can prevent a primary symptom of type 2 diabetes by altering fat metabolism in muscle.

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  • Multiple myeloma clinical trial closes early (05/17/07)
    The Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) permanently closed a federally funded clinical trial that compared a standard drug therapy, dexamethasone, with a combined-drug therapy using an experimental treatment, lenalidomide, in people newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma. Based on results recently announced in a different study, SWOG is offering participants the opportunity to switch to a similar combined-drug therapy that showed better one-year survival and fewer side effects.

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  • Griese/Hutchinson host May 21 golf event for Mott (05/16/07)
    On May 21, Brian Griese and Steve Hutchinson will host the Champions for Childrens Hearts celebrity golf tournament in Ann Arbor to benefit C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and Women's Hospital, and the Michigan Congenital Heart Center. The sold-out event will host several members of the 1997 U-M football championship team, current and former NFL players and personalities, as well as representatives from the 2006 American League Champion Detroit Tigers.

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  • U-M launches Spanish health podcast (05/16/07)
    UMHS and the U-M Portal en Espaol Web site today launched the Universitys first Spanish language health podcast - Actualidad Mdica - that provides consumer-oriented health topics such as cardiovascular disease, pregnancy and diabetes for Spanish speakers around the world.

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  • Breast cancer research benefits from shoe sale (05/15/07)
    Buying a pair of shoes could help researchers in the fight against breast cancer. As a result of the Fashion Footwear Association of New York's annual shoe sale on QVC, Dr. Daniel Hayes of the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center, received $402,000 for his breast cancer research.

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  • Markel now a JAMA Contributing Writer (05/15/07)
    Howard Markel, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Center for the History of Medicine, has been named one of eight contributing writers to the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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  • New food allergy clinic opens at UMHS (05/14/07)
    The rapid proliferation of children developing allergies to foods - such as peanuts, tree nuts, milk and more - has led the University of Michigan Health System to open a new clinic that will include a focus on the problem.

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  • U-M study examines treatment of bleeding stroke patients (05/14/07)
    Each year, tens of thousands of people receive a dreaded diagnosis: intracerebral hemorrhage, or a bleeding stroke. Caused by a burst blood vessel in the brain, ICH kills a quarter of patients in two days, and up to half of them within 30 days. And theres no approved specific medical treatment for it -- though people can recover with specialized hospital care.

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  • UMHS honored for "drug rep" policies (05/11/07)
    UMHS was one of the first medical institutions in the country to place strong limitations on the interactions between medical staff and representatives of companies that make or sell medications, medical devices or other products, and to limit drug samples. Now, that leadership has been recognized by the American Medical Student Association.

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  • iPods may interfere with pacemakers (05/10/07)
    Portable music players called iPods interfered with pacemakers in 30 percent of patients tested in a new study, though none of the interference was life-threatening. The study was presented here by a high school student who worked with a University of Michigan and Michigan State University team; the presentation took place at the Heart Rhythm Society's 28th Annual Scientific Sessions.

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  • 7 common myths about osteoporosis (05/07/07)
    video  Even though millions of Americans suffer from bone loss due to osteoporosis, it still remains a widely misunderstood disease. To help separate fact from fiction, a U-M endocrinologist offers information about osteoporosis, as well as diagnosis, prevention and treatment options available for the disease.

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  • Aging gracefully, with a chronic disease (05/07/07)
    video  For the better part of three decades, Sherrie Kossoudji has endeavored each day to manage the inflammation, chronic pain, tight joints and other types of physical strife caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Now 53, Kossoudji and million of others like her are trying to sort out what is a normal part of aging, and what is a facet of RA.

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  • U-M expert offers 7 tips to prevent, treat poison ivy (05/07/07)
    video  Would you know what to do if you came into contact with poison ivy? To take the itch out of summer for both kids and adults, a U-M expert offers tips to help treat poison ivy, and advice on how to avoid contact with the three leaves of this poison plant.

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  • What's your stroke IQ? (05/07/07)
    video  Stroke is the third largest cause of death and the top cause of disability. Still, studies have shown that Americans don't know enough about why strokes happen, what to do when they happen or how to prevent strokes from happening. So, the U-M Stroke Program is offering a test that can check anyones stroke IQ, and maybe bump it up a few points.

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  • Story ideas for Nurses Week 2007 (05/04/07)
    The work of America's 2.9 million registered nurses to save lives and to maintain the health of millions of individuals is the focus of this year's National Nurses Week, celebrated annually May 6-12 throughout the United States. At the University of Michigan Health System, nurses are a vital part of the high level of care provided to patients. Here, we offer some story ideas for reporters, producers and editors to consider printing or airing in honor of Nurses Week.

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  • Former EarthLink CEO leaves legacy for adrenal cancer (05/03/07)
    When former EarthLink CEO Garry Betty was diagnosed with an extremely rare form of cancer in late 2006, he was determined to use his experience to help others and to find a cure. So he established the Garry Betty Foundation, which today announces a $400,000 gift to the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center for its adrenal cancer program.

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  • Smoking, drug abuse, obesity top public's health concerns for kids (05/03/07)
    Smoking, drug abuse and obesity are the nation's top three health concerns for kids, according to a recent poll conducted by the U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. The poll also revealed that driving accidents, Internet safety, school violence, sexually transmitted infections, and abuse and neglect rank among the top 10 overall health concerns for U.S. children and adolescents.

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  • U-Ms Ginsburg, House elected members of National Academy of Sciences (05/02/07)
    The National Academy of Sciences announced the election of two University of Michigan professors: Dr. David Ginsburg and James S. House.

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  • Good news on heart attack (05/01/07)
    People who suffer a heart attack or severe chest pain today are much less likely to die, or to experience long-lasting effects, than their counterparts even a few years ago, according to a new international study involving U-M researchers. Its the first time that a study has shown a significant drop in the rate of heart failure and death over such a short time in this population.

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April 2007

  • Green tea may be therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (04/30/07)
    A new study from the University of Michigan Health System suggests that a compound in green tea may provide therapeutic benefits to people with rheumatoid arthritis.

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  • James V. Neel Lecture at U-M on Thursday, May 17 (04/30/07)
    A pioneer in understanding cholesterol will talk about his ongoing research to explore details of lipid synthesis that shed light on heart disease, obesity and diabetes.

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  • Tart cherries affect heart/diabetes risk factors (04/30/07)
    Tart cherries may be good for more than just making pie, according to new data from an animal study conducted by U-M researchers. The researchers report that animals that received powdered tart cherries in their diet had lower total cholesterol, lower blood sugar, less fat storage in the liver, lower oxidative stress and increased production of a molecule that helps the body handle fat and sugar.

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  • Aspirin may be less effective heart treatment for women than men (04/26/07)
    A new study shows that aspirin therapy for coronary artery disease is four times more likely to be ineffective in women compared to men with the same medical history.

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  • Pain compounds depression among retired NFL players (04/26/07)
    A study from the University of Michigan Health System has found that retired professional football players experience levels of depressive symptoms similar to those of the general population, but the impact of these symptoms is compounded by high levels of chronic pain.

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  • Is lower cholesterol worth the higher cost? (04/23/07)
    When it comes to cholesterol-lowering drugs, more is better. But are higher doses of statin drugs worth the cost? Not always, finds a new U-M study. But for patients with a recent heart attack or what doctors call acute coronary syndrome, the answer is yes, the researchers say.

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  • End-of-life course offered at U-M (04/23/07)
    The Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON), in conjunction with the City of Hope National Medical Center and the University of Michigan Health System, presents a 2-day conference discussing end-of-life care issues for children and their families. The conference takes place June 8 and 9 on the campus of UMHS.

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  • U-M researchers awarded team science award (04/23/07)
    University of Michigan Health Systemscientist, Arul Chinnaiyan, M.D., Ph.D., and his team have been awarded the inaugural American Association for Cancer Research Team Science Award for their landmark discovery that prostate cancer harbors gene fusions which may be the cause of this highly prevalent disease.

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  • Kelch appointment extended into 2009 (04/20/07)
    Dr. Robert P. Kelch will serve as the University of Michigan's executive vice president for medical affairs and the U-M Health System's chief executive officer for an additional year beyond his original appointment.

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  • Bloom named chair of Urology (04/19/07)
    The University of Michigan Board of Regents today approved the appointment of David A. Bloom, M.D., as chair of the U-M Medical Schools Department of Urology. His appointment is retroactive to March 1.

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  • Campbells give gift to Urology Department (04/19/07)
    Brian and Mary Campbell have given a gift of $2 million to fund a professorship and named it in honor of David A. Bloom, M.D. The first physician to hold the title of David A. Bloom Professor in Urology is J. Stuart Wolf, M.D., the surgeon who performed the medical procedure Campbell credits with enhancing the quality of his life.

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  • U-M poll: More kids to seek care at retail clinics (04/18/07)
    New results from the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital National Poll on Childrens Health show that there is a growing trend for children to use retail clinics for routine health care needs, including screening tests and vaccinations. The poll revealed that among parents who had previously taken their child to a retail clinic for care, more than 70 percent planned to return.

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  • Microbe invaders set off immune response by slipping inside cells (04/16/07)
    U-M pathologists, based on studies in mice, say they have discovered a new way the body's front-line immune response cells respond to infectious agents. Their findings and those of others point to new directions in developing better vaccines and drugs for rheumatoid arthritis and some other autoimmune diseases.

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  • New imaging for prostate cancer in bone (04/16/07)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a new imaging technique that can measure the effectiveness of treatment for prostate cancer that has spread to the bones. The technique involves measuring diffusion of water within tumors.

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  • UMHS named one of nation's top 100 hospitals for third straight year (04/16/07)
    For the third year in a row, the University of Michigan Hospitals and Health System has been named one of the nations 100 Top Hospitals by Solucient - and one of only 15 major teaching hospitals nationwide chosen for the honor.

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  • LSI to host May symposium: Frontiers in Stem Cell Biology (04/13/07)
    Top researchers specializing in stem cell biology will discuss their latest findings at the Life Sciences Institute's sixth annual symposium: Frontiers in Stem Cell Biology. The symposium is co-sponsored with the University of Michigan Center for Stem Cell Biology.

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  • Booster seat giveaway on April 27 (04/12/07)
    On Friday, April 27 C.S. Mott Children's Hospital's Buckle Up! program and Washtenaw County Safe Kids will host a booster seat giveaway. The event will take place from 3-6 p.m. at Crispin Chevrolet, 7112 Michigan Ave. in Saline.

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  • Lights, Action, Camera! World Robotic Gyn Symposium set to begin (04/12/07)
    Three live robot-assisted telesurgeries are highlights at the 2007 World Robotic Gyn Symposium, April 13-14 at Palmer Commons on the U-M campus. The symposium is hosted by the U-M Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Arnold P. Advincula, M.D., FACOG, FACS, will be the course director, and other leading faculty in the field also will participate.

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  • New analysis on two countries' models to tackle genetic testing for breast cancer (04/12/07)
    The United States and Great Britain have taken profoundly different approaches in developing genetic testing for breast cancer which has serious implications for users of health care, says a University of Michigan professor.

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  • Study pries into ovarian cancers deadly secrets (04/11/07)
    A new U-M study sheds light on cell defects that lead to one common type of ovarian cancer and puts forth a promising new mouse model that already is being used for preclinical drug testing.

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  • Lack of control over work hours leads to physician burnout (04/10/07)
    A new national survey of physicians has found that a lack of control of their work hours and schedule often leads to burnout, while many other difficult issues that physicians face do not seem to diminish their career satisfaction.

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  • New $2M grant will fund youth psychosis project (04/10/07)
    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) today announced that the Washtenaw Community Health Organization (WCHO) and the University of Michigan (U-M) have been selected to participate in a pioneering national program to reduce the terrible toll of psychotic illnesses on young people and their families through prevention.

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  • In-school talk therapy can help teens (04/09/07)
    Training school social workers to lead talk therapy sessions during the school day can help teens and pre-teens recognize and begin to overcome mild depression, anxiety and anger problems, U-M research is showing. A new free handbook is available to help schools offer the option.

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  • A prescription for exercise (04/05/07)
    Primary care physicians should play an important role in communicating the benefits of exercise and encouraging physical activity among their patients, says a new paper from the Department of Family Medicine. One suggestion: writing a prescription for the type and duration of exercise the patient should try.

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  • Help child and parent together to overcome intimate partner violence (04/05/07)
    Children exposed to domestic violence are about 75 percent more likely to recover with fewer problems if their mothers are part of the intervention process, according to new University of Michigan psychology research.

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  • Stopping cancer before it starts: Town Hall event (04/05/07)
    Can a simple blood test tell you if you have cancer or are at high risk of developing cancer long before any symptoms or signs of disease appear? The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and the non-profit Friends of Cancer Research will host a special town hall on April 11to discuss the impact of research on cancer prevention and early detection. A live webcast of the program will be available.

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  • Device screens patients in minutes for periodontal disease (04/04/07)
    A portable saliva test device developed by a University of Michigan School of Dentistry professor could tell patients in just minutes if they have periodontal disease, a hefty improvement over current methods which require hours of analysis at an off-site lab.

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  • The stress of war harms civilian men more than women (04/04/07)
    A man's health and behavior are more adversely impacted by war and the associated disruption than a woman'sas evidenced by the dramatic jump in non-combat mortality for Croatian men during the Croatian War of Independence, a new study shows.

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  • U-M "health fiesta" provides resources for Latino families (04/04/07)
    In an effort to reduce the health disparities faced by the Latino population, the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center is sponsoring a health fiesta in Washtenaw County. The annual event, Dia de la Mujer Latina, features free screenings, information booths and resources that address significant health issues in the Latino community. The health fair takes place from 1-5 p.m. April 14 in the Morris Lawrence Building of Washtenaw Community College in Ann Arbor.

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  • 7 common myths about irritable bowel syndrome (04/02/07)
    video  While IBS is a common disorder - affecting 10 to 15 percent of the U.S. population - its also one of the most misunderstood among patients and physicians alike. To help separate IBS fact from fiction, a U-M gastroenterologist offers information about the condition, as well as diagnosis and treatment options available.

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  • Connecting adults with cerebral palsy to virtual trainers (04/02/07)
    video  A new program developed by the U-M Health System and the U-M School of Kinesiology is making movement-based therapy more convenient and assessable to adults with cerebral palsy. Called ULTrA, the program uses the Internet and streaming video to connect patients to virtual trainers and real-life experts at U-M via their home computer.

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  • Hope for ending the pain, infertility of endometriosis? (04/02/07)
    video  An ongoing U-M Health System study is looking at the use of a common diabetes medication, rosiglitzaone, to treat endometriosis. Use of the drug would allow women with endometriosis to be treated without compromising their future fertility.

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  • Leg pain can mean heart danger, U-M expert says (04/02/07)
    video  Most people think clogged artery disease, or arterial sclerosis, only happens in the heart. But it can happen throughout the body. When it does, its called peripheral arterial disease or PAD. And in some people, PAD causes leg pain that can act as an early warning symptom that someone is at high risk for a heart attack or a stroke, say U-M experts.

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March 2007

  • A sweet step toward new cancer therapies (03/30/07)
    By recognizing sugars, a technique developed by University of Michigan analytical chemist Kristina Hakansson sets the stage for new cancer diagnosis and treatment options.

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  • The results are in: Project Healthy Schools gets an A (03/30/07)
    America is facing an epidemic. Despite numerous studies showing the negative effects of obesity on everything from heart disease and diabetes to possible links with cancer, one in five American children is obese. However, a collaborative program sponsored by the University of Michigan and the Ann Arbor community teaches children healthy habits and offers hope for a healthier future. And results from a new study suggest that the program is working.

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  • U-M Medical School ranks in U.S. News top 10 (03/30/07)
    The University of Michigan Medical School has been recognized as one of the best in the country with a ranking in the top 10 of the annual U.S.News & World Report Best Graduate School listings. Among research-oriented medical schools, U-M tied for 10th overall among the nations 125 fully accredited medical schools and placed in highly in five specialties: family medicine (4), geriatrics (5), womens health (6), internal medicine (8)and pediatrics (12).

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  • Nutrients might prevent hearing loss due to noise (03/28/07)
    In a new study in animals, U-M researchers report that a combination of high doses of vitamins A, C, and E and magnesium, taken one hour before noise exposure and continued as a once-daily treatment for five days, was very effective at preventing permanent noise-induced hearing loss. The nutrient combination will be tested in humans soon.

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  • Engineering the heart, piece by piece (03/27/07)
    Some day, heart attack survivors might have a patch of laboratory-grown muscle placed in their heart, and children born with defective heart valves might get new ones that can grow in place. But while these possibilities are all within reach, and could transform the way heart care is delivered, hurdles still remain, according to a new article.

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  • Surgeons referrals for breast reconstruction (03/26/07)
    Forty-four percent of surgeons do not refer the majority of their breast cancer patients to a plastic surgeon prior to the initial surgery when the woman is choosing her treatment course, according to a new study. The finding may help explain the consistently low number of women who pursue breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

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  • Tom Campbell named associate VP (03/23/07)
    Tom Campbell has been named to the new position of associate vice president for strategic planning and business development at the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • Clinical trial of creatine for Parkinsons disease begins (03/22/07)
    The U-M is one of only two locations in Michigan taking part in a new national clinical trial to learn if the nutritional supplement creatine can slow the progression of Parkinsons disease. People in the early stages of Parkinson's are now being sought to participate in the placebo-controlled Phase III study.

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  • Help cancer patients Spring to Life (03/19/07)
    It isnt every day that you can eat an amazing meal, buy beautiful flower arrangements, and support cancer patients all at once. Fortunately, the University of Michigans Spring to Life benefit on March 25 allows you to do just that. Its just another reason to love Michigan in the springtime (The University of, that is).

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  • Smoking linked with aging on skin not exposed to sunlight (03/19/07)
    A new study from the University of Michigan Health System adds another dimension to the link between cigarette smoking and skin damage. The study suggests that smoking may be associated with a higher degree of aging on areas of skin, such as that of the inside of the upper arm, that are not normally exposed to sunlight.

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  • Spirituality increases as alcoholics recover (03/19/07)
    A new study from the U-M Addiction Research Center sheds light on the issue of spirituality during alcoholism recovery, finding that it tends to increase during the recovery process - - and that people who experience increases in certain measures of spirituality are most likely to be sober six months later.

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  • Local kids learn soccer skills, dangers of tobacco use (03/16/07)
    To raise youngsters awareness of the dangers of tobacco use and help them avoid the lure of tobacco marketing campaigns, the University of Michigan Tobacco Consultation Service will host Kickin It, an event that combines soccer instruction with tobacco education activities for K-8 kids.

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  • Medical School team wins Business Intelligence Award for M-Dash software (03/15/07)
    M-Dash, a web-based system of tools that allows for quick data analyses and financial, space, clinical, and faculty planning many years into the future, is a winner of a U-M Business Intelligence Data-Into-Action Award.

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  • March Madness Against Blindness to benefit Kellogg research (03/13/07)
    An event called March Madness Against Blindness is being held March 15-16, to raise awareness and funds to support research at Kellogg.

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  • Obese patients run higher risk of post-surgery complications (03/13/07)
    Obese patients have a significantly higher risk of complications following surgery, including heart attack, wound infection, nerve injury and urinary tract infection, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • U-M launches innovative program to help those who take many prescription medicines (03/12/07)
    Over 3,000 U-M employees, retirees and their dependents who take nine or more prescription drugs will be offered advice on how to improve health, cut costs, and reduce risks.

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  • Stem cell finding could help reduce transplant rejection rates (03/08/07)
    A new study from the University of Michigan Health System involving a type of stem cells from the lungs of transplant patients demonstrates for the first time that these progenitor cells reside in adult organs and are not derived from bone marrow, which leads to the possibility that the cells may be able to help with the rejection of donated organs and with various kinds of lung disease.

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  • U-M registering now for Mini-Med School (03/08/07)
    If youve missed your calling to become a doctor but would still like a glimpse of medical school, its not too late. The U-M Medical School is now enrolling students in its seventh annual Mini-Med School to be held from 7 to 9:15 p.m., every Wednesday from April 4 to May 9 on the Medical School campus.

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  • A year of added life more valuable for the young, study suggests (03/07/07)
    Many important health policy issues, such as the allocation of avian flu vaccine in a pandemic or mandatory HPV vaccinations for young women, require policy makers to decide healthcare priorities for different age groups

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  • April 20 benefit concert will be "Making Music for Mott" (03/07/07)
    Fifteen-year-old violin prodigy Jourdan Urbach has already used his talents to raise more than $1.3 million for childrens charities. On Friday, April 20, he will continue that effort, as he joins the University of Michigan Life Sciences Orchestra for a concert benefitting the U-M C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital.

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  • Researchers identify ovarian cancer biomarkers (03/07/07)
    Researchers have identified markers unique to the cells of blood vessels running through ovarian tumors. The finding, while preliminary, could one day improve screening, diagnosis and treatment for this disease.

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  • Study looks at impact of heart-only hospitals (03/06/07)
    Across the country, states are embroiled in a debate over specialty hospitals - physician-owned hospitals that focus on a single area such as heart care. Now a new study shows that these hospitals may drive up the use of non-emergency heart care.

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  • You don't snooze, you lose: Tips for "springing forward" (03/06/07)
    This Sunday, a lot of brains will be thrown out of whack, as the clocks shift forward by an hour in the earliest-ever return to Daylight Saving Time (DST). Fortunately, theres still time to reduce the impact that this time shift will have on you, say experts from the University of Michigan Sleep Disorders Center.

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  • Childhood obesity may contribute to earlier puberty for girls (03/05/07)
    Researchers at U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital say increasing rates of childhood obesity and overweight in the United States may be contributing to an earlier onset of puberty in girls. In a study published this month in Pediatrics, they found that higher body mass index (BMI) score in girls as young as age 3, and large increases in BMI between 3 years of age and first grade are associated with earlier puberty

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  • Colon cancer risk: Its often all in the family (03/05/07)
    video  Since about 10 percent of all colon cancers have a genetic component to them, experts at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center recommend that people with a strong family history of colon cancer get genetic counseling and early screening to know their risks.

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  • New device offers hope to children with chest, spinal deformities (03/05/07)
    video  The U-M C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital is the first in the state to offer a new device to help children born with a deformity of the chest wall or spine grow normally into adulthood. Called VEPTR, this implantable device is designed to mechanically stabilize and lengthen certain deformities of the spine and torso, allowing normal lung development and offering correction for some spinal conditions.

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  • Start eating green for your health this St. Patricks Day (03/05/07)
    video  This St. Patricks Day, try adding a new green tradition - more green foods to your diet. From broccoli and spinach to avocado and kiwifruit, green foods can pack a healthy punch by increasing your daily intake of vitamins, minerals and fibers to help to lower cholesterol, strengthen bones, and improve heart health and digestion.

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  • Taking aim at a killer: U-M protocol targets aggressive brain cancer (03/05/07)
    video  When 50-year-old Joseph Wollschlager Jr. was diagnosed with a life-threatening brain tumor the outlook was grim: Survival rates for this type of cancer are usually less than a year. But thanks to a new treatment regimen being tested at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center that uses a type of radiation treatment called intensity-modulated radiation therapy, Wollschlager now is back to work and optimistic about his prognosis.

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  • Prostate Cancer Foundation honors four from U-M (03/02/07)
    The Prostate Cancer Foundation has awarded $6.1 million to 63 research investigators, including four from the University of Michigan, in its 2006 Competitive Awards Program. U-M winners are Arul M. Chinnaiyan, M.D., PhD; Robert D. Loberg, PhD; Russell S. Taichman, DMD, DMSc; and Shaomeng Wang, PhD.

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  • April 15 hockey event to benefit Kids Burn Camp (03/01/07)
    On Sunday, April 15, the Roseville Fire Department will take on the Fraser Department of Public Safety in hockey to benefit the U-M Trauma Burn Center's Kids Burn Camp. The event will be held at 3:30 p.m. at Great Lakes Sports City.

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February 2007

  • 12 myths about colon cancer (02/23/07)
    Colorectal cancer screening prevents more deaths due to early detection than breast or prostate cancer screening. Yet colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death because not enough people get screened. Experts from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center address some of the common myths and misconceptions about colon cancer.

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  • Medicalize me: How disease is perceived (02/23/07)
    Do prescription drug ads make people think theyre sick when theyre not, or create disease out of thin air? These questions and more are the focus of a new set of probing essays on the topic of medicalization and what it means in modern society. A U-M psychiatrist is the lead author.

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  • Detroit Tiger Brandon Inge, wife give $100,000 to Mott (02/19/07)
    Detroit Tiger third baseman Brandon Inge and his wife, Shani, are giving a $100,000 gift to Mott to create an activity area in the pediatric cancer infusion clinic in the new C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital and Womens Hospital, set to open in 2011. The Inges' gift furthers their commitment to Mott by creating a space in the new hospital that is not only fun for our patients, but key to the medical process.

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  • New joint venture seeks to improve health care (02/19/07)
    A new Michigan organization is dedicated to improving the quality of the states health care system, and transforming the way patient care is delivered in the state and beyond. Called Michigan HealthQuarters LLC, it is a joint venture of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • Patients lack awareness of common drug's downsides (02/19/07)
    People who use the popular pain reliever acetaminophenfound in Tylenol and many combination pain and cough-cold medicationsare ill-informed about safe dosages and the hazards of overdosing, a University of Michigan study suggests.

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  • The science behind a wrinkle-filler (02/19/07)
    The current battle between the makers of anti-wrinkle products - widely compared with the Coke and Pepsi struggle for superiority - is receiving an injection of scientific understanding with the release of a new study from the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • A gift from a 'founding father' of family medicine at U-M (02/16/07)
    George A. Dean, M.D., one of the founding fathers of the family medicine specialty at the University of Michigan Health System, has given a gift to honor the department he helped to establish.

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  • Nursing Career Fair March 9 (02/15/07)
    The University of Michigan Nursing Career Fair, to be held on March 9, will showcase the range of careers possible for nurses at the U-M Health System.

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  • Kids who snack in large groups tend to eat more (02/14/07)
    According to researchers at the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, children snacking in big groups eat almost a third more than when snacking with a couple of kids. Results from this research is published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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  • Genetic testing sheds light (02/13/07)
    Genetic testing for eye disease is providing vital information about complex retinal diseases, especially when used to confirm a clinicians diagnosis, according to new research from the U-M Kellogg Eye Center.

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  • Quality of medical translations impacts quality of care (02/13/07)
    An increasing number of Americans don't speak English and when doctors and patients have language and cultural barriers, the quality of translations can be a problem, University of Michigan researchers argue in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

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  • Better depression treatment for college students will be focus of U-M conference (02/09/07)
    The fifth annual Depression on College Campuses Conference, organized by the University of Michigan Depression Center in collaboration with many U-M schools and colleges, takes place on March 19 and 20.

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  • Robotic exoskeleton replaces muscle work (02/09/07)
    A robotic exoskeleton controlled by the wearer's own nervous system could help users regain limb function, which is encouraging news for people with partial nervous system impairment, say University of Michigan researchers.

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  • Michigans medical schools, teaching hospitals make major economic impact (02/07/07)
    A new report from the Association of American Medical Colleges reveals that its member medical schools and teaching hospitals had a combined economic impact of $451 billion on their states and the nation in 2005. In Michigan, the University of Michigan Medical School and other academic medical centers across the state had a combined economic impact of $18,720,302,535.

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  • U-M Trauma Burn experts offer tips to prevent frostbite (02/07/07)
    Due to recent sub-zero temperatures, the U-M Trauma Burn Center has seen an increase in serious cases of frostbite and frostbite-related injuries. To help prevent more injury, Trauma Burn experts offer five tips to help avoid frostbite during the cold winter months.

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  • U-M Hospital to open new quick-casual restaurants (02/06/07)
    In spring 2007, U-M Hospital will open two new food services, bringing greater options in healthy dining to visitors and staff.

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  • 9 health issues that can impact sexual satisfaction (02/05/07)
    video  Most (64 percent of Americans, according to one recent study) are satisfied with their sex lives. But many health issues can get in the way of having a good sex life, from prescription medication side effects to depression to sexually transmitted diseases. In most cases, physicians can work with their patients to improve the situation.

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  • Condition that causes irregular menstrual cycles can lead to fertility problems (02/05/07)
    video  For many women, irregular or infrequent menstrual cycles may not sound like such a bad thing. But a condition that can cause irregular periods - polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS - can lead to numerous health concerns, ranging from excess hair growth to fertility issues to an increased risk of heart disease and diabetes.

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  • Early detection of artery weakening can be a life-saver (02/05/07)
    video  Ruptured aortic aneurysms are the 10th most common cause of death in the country. Thats why U-M experts say routine screening can be a life-saver, especially since patients often have no symptoms. Now, many newly qualified Medicare patients will be able to receive screening for aneurysms as part of their regular physical exam.

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  • New treatments fight GVHD in bone marrow transplant patients (02/05/07)
    video  About half of all patients who receive a bone marrow transplant from donor cells will develop a potentially life-threatening condition called graft versus host disease. Now researchers at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center say a rheumatoid arthritis drug, when combined with traditional steroid medication, can eliminate GVHD in more than two-thirds of bone marrow transplant patients.

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  • UMHS helps employees find volunteering match (02/05/07)
    Will you be my volunteer? A new website being launched by UMHS allows employees to find their perfect volunteering match based on interest and location. Dog lovers can be paired with area shelters, knitters can donate their blankets to a local hospice center, and artists can paint a play castle for a Habitat for Humanity fundraiser, for example. A booth will be set up on Valentine's day to give out "Voluntines" and candy promoting the site.

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  • Faster heart attack care coming to Michigan hospitals (02/02/07)
    Representatives from dozens of hospitals across Michigan are launching an all-out effort to speed heart attack treatment for Michigan residents -- specifically, to decrease the time it takes to diagnose and treat patients using emergency angioplasties.

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  • Dave Morlock named CFO of UMHHC (02/01/07)
    David Morlock, M.B.A., a longtime University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers employee who has helped shape the finances of the institution and to steer many high-profile efforts, has been named the new chief financial officer of UMHHC.

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  • Pancreatic cancer stem cells identified (02/01/07)
    Universityof Michigan Comprehensive CancerCenter researchers have discovered the small number of cells in pancreatic cancer that are capable of fueling the tumors growth. The finding is the first identification of cancer stem cells in pancreatic tumors.

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January 2007

  • Esophageal cancer and obesity (01/31/07)
    The rapidly climbing obesity rates in the United Stateshave created a higher risk of esophageal cancer linked to reflux disease. And this has some surgeons wondering if a currently popular procedure to remove the esophagus is as safe in obese patients.

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  • Link between childbirth and fallen bladder, uterus (01/31/07)
    New research from the University of Michigan Health System establishes one of the strongest connections yet discovered between muscle damage that can occur during vaginal deliveries and pelvic organ prolapse, a condition that causes the uterus, bladder or bowel to fall down later in a womans life. Rates were particularly high when forceps had been used to assist the delivery.

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  • New technology treats GI disorders without surgery (01/31/07)
    The U-M Health System is now in the beginning stages of using double balloon endoscopy technology - a minimally-invasive scope procedure capable of exploring, diagnosing and even treating obscure gastrointestinal disorders in the small intestine with minimal discomfort to the patient and without invasive surgical intervention.

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  • U-M/Harvard team proposes way to get more for our health $$$ (01/30/07)
    Like a one-size-fits-all shirt that doesnt fit anyone very well, American health insurance plans charge every person the same out of pocket cost for medical services - regardless of their effect on a persons health. We could get a lot more value out of our health dollars by abandoning this old-fashioned system, says a team from UMHS and Harvard University.

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  • Walk 4 Kids is March 31 (01/30/07)
    Four special childrens agencies - The Make-A-Wish Foundation of Michigan, the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ronald McDonald House of Ann Arbor, and U-M C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital and Womens Hospital - will come together on March 31 to host the Walk 4 Kids event in Ann Arbor. The walk is open to the public, with funds benefitting these four local children's agencies.

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  • Significant link in brain-obesity puzzle found (01/29/07)
    A single protein in brain cells may act as a linchpin in the bodys weight-regulating system, playing a key role in the flurry of signals that govern fat storage, sugar use, energy balance and weight, UMHS researchers report.

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  • U-M heads new national neurological emergencies research network (01/29/07)
    Every twenty-eight seconds, someone in America suffers a stroke, a massive seizure, a brain or spinal cord injury, or another major emergency affecting the brain, spine or nerves. This week, a team of researchers from around the country will gather in Michigan to kick off an unprecedented national effort to find better emergency treatments.

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  • Bowl for Burns event to benefit U-M Trauma Burn Center (01/26/07)
    The 26th annual Bowl for Burns event, which benefits the University of Michigan Trauma Burn Center, will take place each Friday at 9:30 p.m., and Saturday at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., Feb. 2 through March 3 at Parkway Lanes in Trenton.

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  • U-M Health System launches clinical research study registry (01/26/07)
    A new tool at the Engage Web site that educates and informs prospective volunteers to University of Michigan clinical research studies was launched today. The Engage Registry makes it easier than ever for people to express their interest in clinical research and potentially find a match among the many U-M clinical studies seeking human volunteers.

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  • Ghana Night raises fund for West African medical rehab program (01/25/07)
    Ghana Night at the Michigan Theater will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 16, to benefit the joint effort of the Ghana Medical Rehabilitation Group and the International Rehabilitation Forum to build a premier Ghana-based training program for West African rehabilitation professionals.

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  • Scientists studying diseases will benefit from new protein interactions database (01/24/07)
    Research on disease processes will accelerate with a new multi-purpose protein database launched by the University of Michigan. This new tool will help biomedical scientists digest the enormous volumes of data being produced by modern biotechnology. This database, called Michigan Molecular Interactions (MiMI) index, gathers data from multiple well-known protein interaction repositories and merges the information to create a new database using novel computational technology.

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  • U-M to sponsor weight-loss seminar (01/22/07)
    February is a time when many people have a hard time sticking to the weight-loss goals they made in the beginning of the year. But don't worry; a womens health seminar sponsored by the University of Michigan Womens Health Program can help those people struggling to manage their weight. The lecture, Ways to Weigh No More, will be given by Holly Scherer, Registered Dietitian, with U-M's MFit Nutrition Initiatives. She will discuss ways to easily implement weight management strategies used by more than 3,000 people who have successfully lost weight and kept it off. The seminar is Monday, February 12, at 6:30 p.m.

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  • Are women seeing the most experienced breast surgeons? (01/18/07)
    Women who took more control over choosing their breast cancer surgeon were more likely to be treated by more experienced breast surgeons and at a hospital affiliated with an accredited cancer program, compared to women who were referred by another doctor or their health plan.

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  • Pill, politics & public trust: Feb. 16 event looks at pharmaceutical industry (01/18/07)
    The pharmaceutical industry is one of America's favorite punching bags. But why do these negative perceptions exist, and what is the impact of this erosion of trust in the companies that make our medicines? A Feb. 16 forum at U-M will explore these questions and more.

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  • Poorer women get reduced chemotherapy (01/18/07)
    Breast cancer patients who have a lower household income and less education may be more likely to receive reduced doses of chemotherapy, according to a new study from a University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher.

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  • Prostate cancer trial closes early (01/18/07)
    The Southwest Oncology Group, a national cancer research consortium, has closed one of its trials because of an unexpected pattern of late side effects. The trial, S9921, was testing a new treatment for poor risk prostate cancer.

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  • Beyond LASIK: New option at U-M's Kellogg Eye Center (01/17/07)
    If you're not a candidate for LASIK eye surgery, don't give up hope. The U-M's Kellogg Eye Center is now one of just a handful of eye centers in Michigan offering a new vision-correction procedure that can help you shed your glasses or contact lenses. The procedure involves implantable lenses, called phakic intraocular lenses or IOLs, that are surgically inserted into the eye.

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  • One-third of children having surgery overweight or obese (01/16/07)
    A very high proportion of children who are having surgery are overweight or obese, and because of the excess weight have a greater chance of experiencing problems associated with the surgery, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • Stem cell marker identified in head and neck cancer (01/16/07)
    Researchers have found a marker on head and neck tumor cells that indicates which cells are capable of fueling the cancer's growth. The finding is the first evidence of cancer stem cells in head and neck tumors.

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  • 15 myths about cervical cancer (01/10/07)
    Thanks in large part to early detection through screening and a new vaccine now available, cervical cancer is a disease that can be almost entirely prevented. In honor of Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, which is January, U-M experts respond to common myths and misconceptions about this disease.

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  • Adults living with children eat more fat (01/10/07)
    Adults living with children eat more saturated fat -- the equivalent of nearly an entire small frozen pepperoni pizza each week -- than do adults who do not live with children, according to a University of Iowa and University of Michigan Health System study.

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  • Major variation in Medicare Rx costs found (01/10/07)
    This week, Congress may begin debate on a proposal to change the Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. By coincidence, a new U-M study finds a good reason to do so: major variations between states in the out-of-pocket costs that seniors have to pay, even for the same drugs in the lowest-cost plans in each state.

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  • Detroit Tigers host 'base-bowl' event to benefit Mott on Jan. 18 (01/09/07)
    The American League champion Detroit Tigers will host the bowling event "Base-Bowl" with Champions at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 18 at Colonial Lanes in Ann Arbor to benefit the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and the Detroit Tigers Foundation.

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  • Turning green gunk to gold, anti-cancer gold (01/08/07)
    Combining synthetic chemistry techniques with a knowledge of the properties and actions of enzymes, scientists have been able to produce an exciting class of anti-cancer drugs originally isolated from blue-green algae.

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  • U-M leading national effort to find the cause of autism (01/08/07)
    University of Michigan researchers are leading an 11-university consortium to gather and bank DNA samples from 3,000 autism patients over the next three years.

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  • Mott ranked top children's hospital in state by Child magazine (01/04/07)
    The U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital is ranked as the top children's hospital in the state, and among the best in the nation, according to a highly competitive national survey released today by Child magazine. Mott ranked 13 overall, with pediatric cardiac care ranking seventh nationwide.

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  • Are 1/3 of costly heart devices unnecessary? (01/03/07)
    Tens of thousands of heart patients have high-tech devices implanted in their chests each year, to protect them against sudden cardiac death. But a new U-M and Cincinnati study finds that while many of these patients will benefit from their ICDs, a large number wont - and a simple heart-rhythm test can tell whos who.

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  • 7 things to know about preventing, treating winter laryngitis (01/02/07)
    video  Viral laryngitis is contagious and passes the same way as common colds and flu bugs. To avoid getting laryngitis, a U-M expert suggests seven ways to prevent and treat this inflammation of the voice box, and offers suggestions for caring for your voice even when it's healthy.

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  • An easy New Year's resolution: Get your flu shot (01/02/07)
    That's right, it's still not too late to get a flu shot but time is running out. The University of Michigan Health System's Michigan Visiting Nurses will offer two flu shot clinics in coming days, on Jan. 5 and Jan. 9.

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  • An end to periods? (01/02/07)
    video  When birth control pills first hit the market in the 1960s, women generally took three weeks of active contraceptive pills followed by one week of placebos or no pills. Now, many gynecologists believe that the week without contraception isn't necessary. And while some debate surrounds the issue, numerous women are opting to take hormonal contraceptive products continually as a way of stopping the cycle entirely or for several months at a time

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  • Everyone needs to be on the lookout for warning signs of teen suicide (01/02/07)
    video  On the surface, Chase Edwards appeared to be a bright and happy boy. But his parents didn't realize that his problems sleeping and his irritability were more than just adolescent moodiness until he took his own life at the age of 12. With the hope of saving other young, bright lives, the Edwards family recently helped pass a law that will encourage school systems in Michigan to train school personnel in some of the signs of clinical depression in youth.

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  • New thinking needed on homesickness (01/02/07)
    A new report co-authored by a U-M expert urges parents and childrens doctors to change their thinking about homesickness among children, to see it as a nearly universal but highly preventable and treatable phenomenon - rather than an unavoidable part of childhood.

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  • Spice up your health this new year (01/02/07)
    video  This New Year, make the resolution to spice up your health - literally. By adding spices like basil, oregano, garlic and rosemary to your diet, you can fight cancer, lower blood pressure and even maintain a healthy weight.

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  • When good cells go bad by the fat company they keep (01/02/07)
    Macrophages are normally good cells and key players in the immune system to fight off foreign invaders. But when a macrophage is presented with a high-fat diet, that cell starts to protest by causing inflammation.

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