Text Only Link

Search press releases
Search entire Web site
UMHS Home/Logo

2003 News Releases

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

Past UMHS Releases

2006 News Releases
2005 News Releases
2004 News Releases
2002 News Releases
2001 News Releases

Current News Releases
Recent News Releases

December 2003

back to top
 

November 2003

back to top
 

October 2003

back to top
 

September 2003

back to top
 

August 2003

back to top
 

July 2003

back to top
 

June 2003

  • FDA approves BEXXAR (06/30/03)
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today their approval of the cancer treatment Bexxar (tositumomab and iodine I 131 tositumomab), developed and tested at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

  •  
  • Two U-M nurses receive top honors (06/27/03)
    The Washtenaw-Livingston-Monroe Nurses Association recently presented two University of Michigan nurses with its most prestigious honors, including

  •  
  • Michigan Eye Bank provides the gift of sight (06/26/03)
    The Michigan Eye Bank at the University of Michigan is one of the 10 most active corneal donation centers in the country, according to a data analysis by Transplant News, an independent bi-monthly newsletter.

  •  
  • $10 million grant to fund center on shaping healthy behavior (06/25/03)
    A Cancer Center physician received a $10 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to form the new University of Michigan Center for Health Communications Research. The center will study how information technology can tailor behavior advice to the specific needs of the user.

  •  
  • Adults not getting recommended care (06/25/03)
    In the largest and most comprehensive examination ever conducted of health care quality in the United States, researchers at RAND Health and the University of Michigan found that adults fail to receive recommended health care nearly half the time.

  •  
  • U-M Transplant Center Ranked Among Best in Nation (06/25/03)
    The University of Michigan Health System is one of the 10 most active organ transplant centers in the country, according to a data analysis by Transplant News, an independent bi-monthly newsletter.

  •  
  • U-M Multidisciplinary Pain Center in top 35 of nation (06/24/03)
    The University of Michigan Health System's Multidisciplinary Pain Center is one of the 35 top hospital-based pain management centers in the country, according to a recent article in Good Housekeeping, a magazine read by nearly 25 million people.

  •  
  • Update on pregnant trauma patient (06/23/03)
    Information on the condition of Jessie Wickham, a pregnant Michigan woman who is being treated at the U-M Trauma Burn Center for injuries suffered on June 11.

  •  
  • Residency programs - past, present and future - are under the microscope at Chicago symposium (06/20/03)
    Medical residency programs are in a state of flux, and even health care professionals wonder how this essential part of a physician's professional development will shape up in the new century. What are the opportunities and challenges for these programs in the United States - today and in the future? How will the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education's new duty hour standards affect residents and residency programs?

  •  
  • Berkley man fights cancer by competing in Ironman race (06/19/03)
    In the past, George Ostrander, a veteran triathlon competitor, would have focused his training on qualifying for a spot in the top Ironman competition in Hawaii. Now his concentration lies solely on raising money to continue the fight against sarcoma, the deadly cancer that took the life of his wife, Missy, after nine years.

  •  
  • Information on the U-M Liver Transplant Program for viewers of 'Good Morning America' (06/19/03)
    University of Michigan liver transplant patient Michael Hagan appeared on Good Morning America Thursday, June 19, 2003, to talk about the liver transplant he received at University Hospital. He was also recently featured in the Detroit Free Press.

  •  
  • Tigers team up to benefit patients at U-M Children's Hospital (06/19/03)
    On July 9, the Detroit Tigers will bring the ballpark a little closer to the young patients at the University of Michigan's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital who may be unable to visit Comerica Park this summer.

  •  
  • Scientists find protein that controls prostate cancer’s spread (06/17/03)
    Cancer specialists know that it’s not usually prostate cancer itself that kills – it’s the spread of the cancer from the prostate to the rest of the body. But relatively little is known about exactly what makes some men’s cancers spread, or metastasize, while other tumors stay put.

  •  
  • U-M physician appointed co-editor of OEM Report (06/12/03)
    Victor Roth, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.O.E.M., a physician at the University of Michigan Health System's MWorks Occupational Health Clinic in the Department of Emergency Medicine and a School of Public Health faculty member, has been named co-editor of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine (OEM) Report, effective July 1.

  •  
  • Dr. Bartlet wins national surgery award (06/11/03)
    Robert H. Bartlett, MD, FACS, is the recipient of the Jacobson Innovation Award of the American College of Surgeons for the year 2003. Dr. Bartlett received the award in honor of his work in the development and establishment of the first extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) program.

  •  
  • Program promotes healthy food for a healthy life (06/11/03)
    Do you take a multivitamin with folic acid every day? Or maybe you regularly eat foods rich in folic acid like oranges, dark green leafy vegetables or fortified bread?

  •  
  • Physicians think savings benefit insurance companies (06/10/03)
    At a time when health care costs are rising, a new study led by a University of Michigan Health System doctor finds that many physicians think their efforts at saving money don't directly impact patients.

  •  
  • Patient transfers hurt hospital rankings, study finds (06/09/03)
    In an era when hospital rankings, report cards and quality surveys steer the nation's health care decisions, a new study finds that major medical centers may be getting penalized on those measures for doing what they do best: taking care of the patients that no other hospital can or will treat.

  •  
  • Transcendental Meditation study (06/09/03)
    Today, the sponsors of a U-M Health System study on transcendental meditation in schoolchildren are holding a press conference to discuss their overall project, and preliminary results from the UMHS pilot study.

  •  
  • Information on U-M meditation study (06/06/03)
    A U-M Health System study designed to scientifically evaluate the potential effect of transcendental meditation in schoolchildren is in its early stages, but is already receiving widespread attention.

  •  
  • Robert P. Kelch, M.D., recommended as UM EVPMA (06/06/03)
    University of Michigan president Mary Sue Coleman has named noted physician, researcher and health care leader Robert P. Kelch, M.D., to serve as the University's executive vice president for medical affairs and lead the U-M Health System, pending the approval of the Board of Regents.

  •  
  • Health care how should it be (06/03/03)
    As health care costs continue to soar, a program for providing care, developed at the University of Michigan Health System, may become the model of the future for patients with chronic conditions as well as for businesses who foot the bill for medical insurance.

  •  
  • U-M scientists zero in on pancreatic cancer genes (06/03/03)
    Being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer is like receiving a death sentence - one that, for many patients, is carried out within weeks or months of their cancer's discovery. Less than 20 percent of patients are diagnosed in time to qualify for the only known cure - an arduous operation - and only 3 percent of all patients live even five years.

  •  
  • Gene therapy triggers growth of new auditory hair cells in mammals (06/02/03)
    University of Michigan scientists have used gene therapy to grow new auditory hair cells in adult guinea pigs - a discovery that could lead to new treatments for human deafness and age-related hearing loss.

  •  
  • Healthy campers are happy campers: (06/02/03)
    video  In a few short weeks, more than ten million American kids will start heading off to summer camp, and begin making memories and friends that may last a lifetime. Whether it's day camp or sleep-away, sports or computers, miles away or around the corner, camp gives kids a fun outlet to learn and grow.

  •  
  • Keeping on guard against West Nile Virus (06/02/03)
    video  Summer is here and, once again, the threat of West Nile Virus is with us. This virus, which surfaced in the U.S. only a few years ago, is commonly transmitted back and forth between infected birds and mosquitoes. However, humans can become the unintended hosts of the disease when they are bitten by an infected mosquito.

  •  
  • Lawn mower safety could save life and limb this summer (06/02/03)
    video  A lawn mower is much more than just a simple, everyday power tool sitting in your garage - just ask the 75,000 American adults and children who are injured in lawn mower accidents each year.

  •  
  • Overcoming language loss after stroke or other traumatic brain injuries (06/02/03)
    video  Like most people, Debbie Bowland didn't think twice about her ability to have everyday conversations with family and friends. But after a paralyzing stroke more than a year ago, the 59-year-old suddenly found she could no longer speak or read.

  •  
  • Spinal cord injuries increase with warm weather (06/02/03)
    video  On a sunny summer day eight years ago, Randall Veilleux let down his guard for a split second and changed the course of his life forever

  •  
  • U-M celebration gives cancer survivors another reason to smile (06/02/03)
    Laughter can sometimes be the best medicine - especially for patients and families who know what it's like to live with the physical and emotional stress associated with cancer.

  •  
back to top
 

May 2003

  • Kids' backpacks may not cause back pain (05/21/03)
    Backpacks have gotten a bad rap. For years, specialists have urged school children to lighten their loads, wear their backpacks on both shoulders and avoid lugging around those heavy school bags whenever possible.

  •  
  • U-M, Beaumont team up for birth center study (05/21/03)
    The U-M Health System and Beaumont Hospital are among 16 centers across the nation taking part in a new study that uses a teamwork system borrowed from the military to enhance birth-center care.

  •  
  • Many pregnant women may have depression (05/20/03)
    One in five pregnant women may be experiencing symptoms of depression, but few are getting help for it, a new University of Michigan study finds.

  •  
  • U-M expert: Steer clear of leaving kids in cars alone (05/19/03)
    To help parents and guardians best understand the risks involved with leaving young children and infants alone in cars, a U-M expert provides both safety and health information for them to take into consideration throughout the year.

  •  
  • Michigan Center for Diagnosis and Referral now accredited (05/15/03)
    The M-CDR has just been awarded full, three-year accreditation - the highest level for a Managed Behavioral Healthcare Organization - from the National Committee for Quality Assurance. This is the first accreditation survey M-CDR has undertaken.

  •  
  • U-M Regents approve new CVC building plans (05/15/03)
    In a unified effort to combat the nation's and Michigan's leading killer, cardiovascular disease, the University of Michigan Health System is building a unique clinical heart and vascular care facility that will bring together operating rooms, patients rooms, clinics, classrooms and laboratories.

  •  
  • New blood pressure guide co-written by U-M doctor (05/14/03)
    National health officials have just unveiled a new "road map" for treating high blood pressure. A U-M family physician served on the elite committee that wrote the guide in an effort to cut the massive, deadly toll that hypertension takes each year on America's health.

  •  
  • U-M scientists grow new hair in mice (05/14/03)
    U-M scientists discover that a signaling protein can trigger changes in hair follicles and grow new hair in adult mice.

  •  
  • A new wrinkle for Botox: Headache relief (05/13/03)
    Headache sufferers are finding relief from migraines from an unexpected source: Botox, the drug best known for reducing wrinkles.

  •  
  • Survival Flight: Celebrating 20 years of excellence in patient care (05/09/03)
    For 20 years, Survival Flight has provided air and ground emergency triage and care to critically ill or injured patients. On May 17, Survival Flight, will celebrate its 20th anniversary with its patients and the community .

  •  
  • Another reason to get a colonoscopy (05/07/03)
    A new study gives Americans over 50 one more reason not to put off having a colonoscopy to check for colon cancer and its forerunners. Not only is the screening technique already known to be very good at finding problems, but new data now show it's far more cost-effective for most people than promising cancer-preventing drugs will probably be.

  •  
  • Young Iraqi burn patient arrives at U-M Trauma Burn (05/07/03)
    video  In a massive collaborative effort lead by U-M Trauma Burn Center, an Iraqi teenager recently arrived at the U-M to receive specialized treatment for her injuries. She is believed to be the first Iraqi child injured during the war to receive care at a U.S. hospital.

  •  
  • Asthma drug prescriptions keep kids out of ER, study finds (05/06/03)
    Kids who have prescriptions for asthma drugs visits the ER less than those without medicines, a study finds, but many kids still lack medications, and asthmatic African-American and urban children rush to the ER more frequently than others.

  •  
  • SARS Information from the UMHS (05/06/03)
    As the world responds to the ongoing epidemic of the new disease Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), the University of Michigan Health System offers the following resources to our patients and their families, our community, our employees, and the news media.

  •  
  • National study spotlights disparities in kids' vision care (05/05/03)
    Kids who wear eyeglasses may get teased for having “four eyes”, but seeing clearly can make a big difference in school. Now, a new study by University of Michigan pediatricians suggests that not all children are getting the same level of eye care — and that poor, uninsured, black and Hispanic children are getting the least.

  •  
  • Low income kids' height doesn't measure up by age 1 (05/03/03)
    A new study reveals that children from low-income families have lower birth weights and are measurably shorter by age one than children from higher-income families.

  •  
  • Stroke prevention is the best medicine (05/03/03)
    video  Like a bolt of lightning, a stroke is sudden and devastating. More than 730,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year, making it the leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death. But, like staying off the golf course during a storm to avoid lightning, there are ways to greatly reduce your risk of suffering from a stroke.

  •  
  • Locally invented CHAT game wins national award (05/02/03)
    A national group this week honored a team that uses a game to help people better understand health insurance and become more involved in its design.

  •  
  • UMHS celebrates National Nurses' Week (05/02/03)
    Beginning on Tuesday, May 6, nurses across the country, including nurses at the University of Michigan Health System, will begin a week-long celebration of the nurturing and professional spirit of their career, despite looming nurse shortages.

  •  
  • Can daily aspirin therapy save your life? (05/01/03)
    video  There seems to be a lot of new attention focused on good ole’ fashioned aspirin, so much so that it’s recently been touted as a ‘wonder drug.’ Evidence is rapidly growing that supports aspirin’s use in lowering the rates of heart attack, stroke, colon cancer and even Alzheimer’s disease. Given its widespread benefits and extremely low cost, the question is raised, “is daily aspirin therapy for everyone?”

  •  
  • U-M doctors head back to the classroom for business training (05/01/03)
    video  William Barsan wears many hats. He’s an emergency physician who treats patients in the University of Michigan Health System. He is also the department’s chairperson. As such, he is responsible for the department’s research projects, for educational activities involving medical students, interns, residents and fellows, as well as for financial and clinical operations.

  •  
back to top
 

April 2003

  • Medical School scientist elected to National Academy of Sciences (04/30/03)
    Martha Ludwig, Ph.D., U-M professor of biological chemistry and a research scientist in the U-M Biophysics Research Division, is one of 72 new members and 15 foreign associates elected April 29 to the prestigious National Academy of Sciences. She joins three other U-M faculty members affiliated with the Medical School’s Department of Biological Chemistry who are current members of NAS.

  •  
  • Women athletes more likely to injure a knee ligament than are men (04/30/03)
    Women who participate in jumping and pivoting sports, such as basketball, volleyball, and soccer, are up to eight times more likely to rupture the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee than are same-size men participating in these same sports, according to a study in the May 2003 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

  •  
  • U-M patient inspires Michigan Bone Marrow Transplant Day (04/24/03)
    April 24 has officially been declared the first-ever Michigan Bone Marrow and Blood Stem Cell Transplant Awareness Day, through the efforts of a U-M patient and his cancer team.

  •  
  • Free Screening for Peripheral Vascular Disease (04/22/03)
    The University of Michigan Health System will be conducting a free screening for people at risk for vascular diseases, serious non-cardiac conditions of the blood vessels that affect nearly eight million Americans.

  •  
  • New U-M web site explains genes and how they work (04/22/03)
    A new University of Michigan Health System web site called "Genetics: The Symphony of Life," provides basic information about genetics and medicine for the general public, students, teachers or anyone who is interested in genetics, but needs a plain-English explanation of the science.

  •  
  • Study: Mexican prison doctors report torture persists (04/22/03)
    Mexico's government has pledged to improve human rights for prisoners and detainees, but torture still persists in Mexican detention centers, a new study finds.

  •  
  • High-speed images capture cell's immune response (04/16/03)
    New high-speed imaging techniques are allowing scientists to show how a single cell mobilizes its resources to activate its immune response, a news research study shows.

  •  
  • Event helps reduce employee turnover, injury (04/15/03)
    When Lynne Peirce joined the University of Michigan Health System's Medical Information Services (MIS) department in 1999 as manager of Organizational Development, morale was at rock bottom - turnover was high, as were employee grievances and work-related injuries.

  •  
  • Alcohol worsens car crash injuries, study finds (04/14/03)
    Vehicle crash victims who have alcohol in their systems at the time of the crash suffer worse injuries, and are more likely to sustain a severe injury, than those who haven’t been drinking, a new University of Michigan study finds.

  •  
  • Changes in your voice means trouble (04/14/03)
    Most of us don’t think much about our voices from day to day, taking for granted our ability to talk, shout, murmur, laugh and groan. Many people — teachers, lawyers, clergy and salespeople, as well as actors, singers and radio hosts — rely on their voices to do their jobs.

  •  
  • Study looks at treatment of children's rashes (04/11/03)
    Eczema, an itchy rash that affects large numbers of infants and children, should be treated in a new way, according to a new paper outlining best treatments for the disease.

  •  
  • A hip alternative for active patients (04/08/03)
    For six year, the effects of osteoarthritis slowly wore away at the cartilage in Ernest Houghton's hip - forcing the once active 57-year-old jogger, tennis player and skier to give up many of the activities he loved. His life was ruled by intense pain and limited mobility, despite physical therapy and pain medications.

  •  
  • "Early warning" procedure helps more melanoma patients beat cancer (04/07/03)
    video  An "early warning" procedure, called sentinel lymph node mapping, has been used for years by the U-M melanoma team, one of the most experienced in the country, on faces, throats, scalps, ears and necks of melanoma patients.

  •  
  • Are migraine headaches in your coffee cup? (04/07/03)
    video  If you are one of the millions of migraine-sensitive Americans who need caffeine to rev you up for work in the A.M. or pick you up off your desktop in the P.M., you may actually be triggering a debilitating headache that will keep you out of the office altogether. Researchers at the U-M Health System are now studying the relationship between migraine headaches and your daily caffeine habit.

  •  
  • Polio a thing of the past? (04/07/03)
    video  Most Americans think of polio as a thing of the past. Although the disease has largely been eradicated, about one million Americans are polio survivors. For these men and women who contracted the disease through epidemics of the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, many are experiencing the late effects of their struggle with polio. The University of Michigan's Post-Polio Clinic is studying the way age and gender are effecting this population.

  •  
  • Small gland, big problems: Diagnosing thyroid disease (04/07/03)
    video  Even though the thyroid is just a small gland in the neck, located below the Adam's Apple, it has some big responsibilities in your body, including making a hormone that regulates the body's metabolism and organ functions.

  •  
  • North Oakland Medical Centers joins M-CARE network (04/04/03)
    M-CARE, the managed care organization developed by the University of Michigan, announced that North Oakland Medical Centers and its independent physician organization, North Oakland Physician Hospital Organization (NOPHO), have joined its network.

  •  
  • U-M Medical School ranked 8th best in nation (04/04/03)
    The University of Michigan Medical School is one of the 10 best research-oriented medical schools in the country, according to the annual

  •  
  • New department chair for Medical School (04/03/03)
    The U-M Board of Regents has approved the appointment of William L. Smith, Ph.D., as chair of the Medical School's Department of Biological Chemistry and the Minor J. Coon Professor of Biological Chemistry.

  •  
  • Statement on alleged criminal sexual incident at U-M Health System (04/02/03)
    Our patients' safety and well-being is our utmost concern and we expect our staff and patients to uphold all state and federal laws while they are in our medical center.

  •  
  • Brain injury patients turning to alternative medicine (04/01/03)
    More patients than ever before with traumatic brain injuries are turning to complementary and alternative medicine therapies to supplement conventional medical care for their injuries. But the majority of these patients are not discussing their use with their physicians, a new study finds.

  •  
  • Studies try to bypass blocked leg arteries (04/01/03)
    A gene-transfer study aimed at easing the pain and disability caused by blocked leg blood vessels -- via the injection of a gene to encourage the growth of new capillaries - does not improve symptoms more than placebo, new results show.

  •  
  • Study improves heart attack care (04/01/03)
    Doctors today know more than ever about what drugs, treatments and lifestyle changes can help heart attack patients live longer and healthier lives after they leave the hospital. But amazingly enough, as many as half of such patients may not get the prescriptions, tests and counseling they need.

  •  
back to top
 

March 2003

  • Drug shown to cut heart failure deaths (03/31/03)
    A drug that blocks a heart-harming hormone can significantly reduce the risk of death and hospitalization in heart attack patients who have heart failure, with minimal side effects, a new international study released today shows.

  •  
  • Fetal heart diagnosis doesn't always predict survival (03/31/03)
    In the past decade, an increase in prenatal, or in utero, diagnoses of fetal heart conditions has allowed for early diagnosis, planning and counseling for families with infants that require surgical correction shortly after birth, in hopes of improving survival for this high-risk group.

  •  
  • U-M Transplant Center holds campus-wide donation awareness event (03/28/03)
    The University of Michigan Transplant Center is pleased to announce a campus-wide organ and tissue donation event scheduled for Thursday, April 10 through Sunday, April 13. The U-M Organ and Tissue Donation Drive is being coordinated by the Interfraternity Council of the U-M.

  •  
  • U-M regents approve appointment of Gruppen as department chair in Medical School (03/24/03)
    The University of Michigan Board of Regents has approved the appointment of Larry Gruppen, Ph.D., as Chair of the Department of Medical Education and the Josiah Macy Jr. Professor of Medical Education. He will assume his new role on April 1. The Medical School's Department of Medical Education is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year and is one of only seven academic departments of medical education in the country.

  •  
  • Medical students observe Match Day together (03/21/03)
    Students in the University of Michigan Medical School's Class of 2003 were among nearly 24,000 applicants in the National Resident Matching Program who learned yesterday which residency program they will enter for training upon graduation.

  •  
  • U-M Life Sciences Orchestra concludes third season April 13 (03/21/03)
    The nation's only Life Sciences Orchestra, made up of members of the University of Michigan's medical and science community, will conclude its third season on Sunday, April 13, 2003 with a concert at 2 p.m. at Pioneer High School in Ann Arbor.

  •  
  • Racial differences in pain treatment found (03/20/03)
    African Americans may be disproportionately missing out on effective treatment for their chronic pain - from arthritis to backaches - and as a result suffering outsize effects on their ability to work, play and enjoy life, a new study finds.

  •  
  • Study shows public support for doctors who deceive insurers (03/19/03)
    One out of four people preparing to hear the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth have no objection to a doctor lying to an insurance company, according to a study in the March 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

  •  
  • U-M Hospital Security honored by U.S. National Guard (03/18/03)
    Sergeant Andrew Huxley, a member of the United States Army National Guard Military Police, was only six weeks into his new job as a security officer for the University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers Security Services when was he was called into active duty.

  •  
  • Don't spring into home improvement projects without a tetanus shot! (03/17/03)
    Even though there's still snow and ice covering most of Michigan, homeowners, landscapers and builders alike are preparing to plant flowers and gardens, or to construct wood decks and new homes, at the first sign of spring.

  •  
  • Statement on Survival Flight incident (03/16/03)
    On the evening of Sunday, March 16 at approximately 8:15 p.m., the tail of a U-M Survival Flight helicopter hit a small mile-marker road sign on highway M-59, resulting in damage to the aircraft's tail rotor. The aircraft was only a few feet off the ground and contained only the pilot at the time of the incident; there were no injuries.

  •  
  • University of Michigan statement on Chicago Tribune article (03/16/03)
    The March 16, 2003 issue of the Chicago Tribune included an article titled, "Profit motive feared in patenting of breast cancer cells." This article focused on the University of Michigan's decision to seek patent protection for its discovery of tumor-inducing stem cells in breast cancer.

  •  
  • Drinking green beer or whiskey this St. Patrick’s Day? (03/14/03)
    Whether you’ll be hoisting a pint of green beer or tipping back a wee bit of whiskey this St. Patrick’s Day weekend, it’s sure and begorrah that you’ll be taking part in one of the nation’s most alcohol-soaked holidays

  •  
  • Drug developed for rare disease may help millions more as treatment for cancer, autoimmune diseases (03/10/03)
    An anti-angiogenesis drug developed at the University of Michigan is being studied in three different disease families, including multiple forms of cancer. The drug, tetrathiomolybdate or TM, essentially wages war against copper, which serves to choke off tumor growth, fibrosis and inflammation.

  •  
  • Finding new ways to help kids with disabilities make friends (03/10/03)
    It's not always easy for young children to make new friends. And for children with physical disabilities or chronic illnesses, the challenge of developing friendships can be even greater - especially if their disability prevents them from participating in certain social activities or their peers lack knowledge and understanding about their condition.

  •  
  • Can managed care survive today's challenges? (03/07/03)
    On March 21, a panel of experts from the University of Michigan and the public and private sectors will attempt to tackle these thorny issues in a lecture and discussion session presented by the U-M Forum on Health Policy. The Forum is part of the U-M Medical School's Program on Society and Medicine.

  •  
  • Want to finish Med School in six week? (03/07/03)
    If you've missed your calling to become a doctor but would still like a glimpse of medical school, it's not too late. The U-M Medical School is now enrolling students in its third annual Mini-Med School to be held from 7 to 9 p.m., every Tuesday from April 8 to May 13, on the Medical School campus. The tuition is $75 per person; complimentary parking will be provided.

  •  
  • Medical school innovation: program teaches students to walk in patients' shoes (03/05/03)
    video  Beginning this fall, first year medical students at the University of Michigan Medical School will visit patients in their homes to get an understanding of how family, environment, culture, and lifestyle all play a part in an individual's health. The Family Centered Experience is one of the new programs being instituted as part of curriculum changes at the University of Michigan Medical School.

  •  
  • New medications help patients cope with rheumatoid arthritis (03/05/03)
    video  Nancy Brown can still remember her family talking about her great-grandmother - a woman who spent 10 years in bed suffering from what they called "rheumatism", which Brown suspects, after being diagnosed with the autoimmune disorder herself, was really rheumatoid arthritis.

  •  
  • Tattoos and piercings: body art health tips (03/05/03)
    video  Many kids covet them, and most parents dread them. But like it or not, tattoos and body piercings are all the rage. So as the impulsive days of spring break near, physicians at the University of Michigan Health System recommend keeping a level head when considering body art.

  •  
  • The A-B-C's of organic foods (03/05/03)
    video  For a growing number of Americans, the choice seems clear: buy organic. But for many others, the higher price tag or questionable value of organic foods keep them out of the family's grocery cart. What are the health and nutritional differences between organic foods and their traditionally grown counterparts? Are organic foods worth the higher price?

  •  
  • U-M Medical School re-orients approach to teaching medicine (03/05/03)
    video  Information in the medical sciences is growing faster and faster. Health care systems are under increasing pressure to deliver high quality care in a cost-effective manner. Patients are concerned that health care providers no longer have the time to listen to and understand their personal issues. Because of these changes, educators at the U-M Medical School - one of the country's top medical education programs - are in the midst of a significant curriculum revision.

  •  
  • Doctors face-off on ice to benefit heart transplant fund (03/04/03)
    On Saturday, March 22, surgeons, cardiologists, nurses, anesthesiologists, pulmonologists, perfusionists and physician assistants at the University of Michigan Health System will be trading in their scrubs and white coats for ice skates and hockey jerseys.

  •  
  • Anxious America: dealing with terrorism anxiety (03/03/03)
    video  When the U.S. Department of Homeland Security raises the threat level on the advisory system up a notch, the nation's anxiety level follows suit. These days, many Americans are struggling with some tough questions: What does this mean for my family and me? How safe are we? What should we be doing to prepare?

  •  
  • Anxious America: Dealing with war anxiety (03/03/03)
    video  It's everywhere you turn - talk of the war with Iraq, images of American troops in battle. A University of Michigan Health System expert offers suggestions for dealing with the tremendous anxiety war creates - even for those of us watching from afar.

  •  
  • Anxious America: Talking with Kids about War and Terrorism (03/03/03)
    video  Elizabeth Fellows still has vivid and disturbing memories from her youth of graphic television coverage of the Vietnam War.

  •  
  • Golf outing to benefit families with autistic kids (03/03/03)
    Autism, a developmental disorder that makes it difficult for children to communicate with others or relate to the outside world, affects one in every 250 children – and the numbers continue to grow, making it one of the most common disorders affecting children today.

  •  
back to top
 

February 2003

  • Majority of older women don't get mammograms (02/28/03)
    More than half of women over the age of 65 who should be getting regular mammograms aren't, a new study finds. But a companion study shows that a simple mailing -- reminding these women of their Medicare coverage for the exam, and of the high risk of breast cancer they face due to their age -- is enough to prompt a meaningful increase in mammogram use.

  •  
  • U-M Depression Center national advisory board (02/28/03)
    Twenty prominent individuals with an interest in depression and bipolar disorder, and a dedication to addressing the societal consequences of these conditions, will serve on the newly formed national advisory board of the University of Michigan Depression Center.

  •  
  • The common cold coughs up a $40 billion annual price tag (02/24/03)
    Chances are you or someone you know is battling with a nasty cold right now. The cold bug is definitely biting its way into work places and schools all across the country, forcing millions of people to stay home.

  •  
  • U-M scientists find 'stem cells' in human breast cancer (02/24/03)
    Of all the neoplastic cells in human breast cancers, only a small minority - perhaps as few as one in 100 - appear to be capable of forming new malignant tumors, according to just-published research by scientists in the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. The discovery could help researchers zero in on the most dangerous cancer cells to develop new, more effective treatments.

  •  
  • Don't ask, don't tell: medical students' shifting attitudes about permission to examine (02/21/03)
    Medical students commonly perform pelvic examinations in the operating room when the patient is under anesthesia. This educational practice poses no physical harm to the patient, and research shows that most women are willing to allow medical students to perform the examinations, but with the proviso that permission is asked for - and granted.

  •  
  • U-M launches ambitious exploration of inner space (02/20/03)
    A path-breaking collaborative effort of U-M researchers will attempt to capture never-before-seen views of the chemical activity inside living cells in real time and 3-D

  •  
  • U-M to study epilepsy and sleep problems (02/19/03)
    A U-M Health System study will seek to understand the sleep disorders that can come with epilepsy, to study the brain activity patterns that occur when a sleeping person has a seizure, and to see if treating the sleep disturbances can also help reduce the frequency of seizures.

  •  
  • Ecological effects of climate change include human epidemics (02/18/03)
    The link between climate and cholera, a serious health problem in many parts of the world, has become stronger in recent decades, says a U-M scientist who takes an ecological approach to understanding disease patterns.

  •  
  • Hormones and genes alter brain's pain system (02/18/03)
    After several years of using sophisticated brain-imaging techniques that showed the chemical activity in the brain while pain is occurring, U-M researchers have found that sex, hormones and genetics affect brain's pain control system, shaping a person's pain perception.

  •  
  • Pain and the brain (02/18/03)
    We all know people who can take pain or stress much better than we can, and others who cry out at the merest pinprick. We’ve heard stories of people who did heroic deeds despite horrible injuries, and stereotypes about women’s supposedly sensitivity to pain that don’t mesh with their ability to withstand childbirth’s pain.

  •  
  • Networked labs to tackle intestinal bacterium (02/17/03)
    Traditional rivals on the football field, three Michigan universities are working together to perform the most complete functional analysis of an organism done in a single project.

  •  
  • U-M Health System works to recruit more nurses at Feb. 23 career fair (02/17/03)
    After nearly six years working as a technician in the operating rooms and in other areas within the University of Michigan Health System, Kim Blackwell was looking to expand her career. So, having always wanted to become a nurse, Blackwell went back to school to earn her degree in nursing. And once she graduated, Blackwell knew exactly where she wanted to begin her new career as a nurse – at the U-M Health System.

  •  
  • First U.S. child receives implanted miniature heart pump at UMHS (02/14/03)
    Surgeons at the University of Michigan Health System successfully implanted a miniature heart pump in the first American child and the youngest patient in the world, ever to receive the device.

  •  
  • Six U-M Health System sites honored with 2002 Governor's Award of Excellence (02/14/03)
    For the first time, six University of Michigan Health System sites - Brighton Health Center, Briarwood Medical Group, Briarwood Family Practice, Chelsea Family Practice, Canton Health Center and Turner Geriatrics Center - were each honored with the prestigious 2002 Governor's Award of Excellence for Improving Preventive Care in the Ambulatory Care Setting.

  •  
  • Study looks at Hispanics' stroke risk. (02/14/03)
    A new study finds significant medical and demographic differences between Mexican American and non-Hispanic white stroke patients - differences that should be taken into account by those trying to prevent stroke in Hispanic populations, the researchers suggest.

  •  
  • U-M Medical School named training site for RWJ Clinical Scholars (02/14/03)
    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has announced that the University of Michigan Medical School will be one of four institutions to train participants in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, beginning in 2005. The other training sites are: David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; and Yale University School of Medicine. The U-M Medical School has been a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars site since its first cohort arrived in 1995.

  •  
  • Event highlights school-based health and wellness centers (02/13/03)
    February is School-Based Health Center month. In recognition, the Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools (RAHS) and Ann Arbor's Health Place 101 will host a Community Open House on Friday, Feb. 21, from 8 a.m. - 3 p.m., at Scarlett Middle School, 3550 Pittsview in Ann Arbor.

  •  
  • Low libido? New patch may help bring relief to women (02/10/03)
    It's not a subject that most women feel comfortable discussing amongst themselves or sometimes even with their partners. However, low sexual libido, a previously understudied condition, is starting to gain more attention from women and medical researchers alike.

  •  
  • Overcoming the bottleneck in translational research (02/10/03)
    Academic medical centers are challenged to overcome the bottleneck that is widely recognized in translating advances in medical research into improvements in patient care. Gilbert S. Omenn, M.D., Ph.D., will report on innovative ways the U-M Health System works to reduce this bottleneck at the annual meeting of the AAAS.

  •  
  • First conference on depression in college students to be held at University of Michigan (02/07/03)
    The University of Michigan will host the nation's first major conference focused on depression in college students, on March 6 and 7 at the Michigan League in Ann Arbor, MI.

  •  
  • Grant aids in search for genes associated with age-related macular degeneration (02/06/03)
    The Elmer and Sylvia Sramek Charitable Foundation has awarded Kellogg researchers a four-year grant to design and create six interactive and integrated databases that will help them extract meaningful data from two major lines of research currently underway at Kellogg.

  •  
  • Study improves treatment for cocaine's heart effects (02/05/03)
    The largest-ever study of cocaine users who suffered heart-related effects from taking the drug finds that a specially designed plan of emergency-room care for such patients can save both lives and money.

  •  
  • Vaccine shortage exposes nation's "patchwork" system (02/05/03)
    An ongoing national shortage of a vaccine that prevents meningitis and pneumonia in children has left doctors scrambling to provide even the minimum number of shots, and has exposed gaps in the nation's "patchwork" vaccine system, the first-ever in-depth study of the problem finds.

  •  
  • How can you mend a broken heart? (02/03/03)
    video  A new treatment being tested by doctors and researchers at the U-M and other institutions may help mend patients'

  •  
  • Living with lupus: when the body turns on itself (02/03/03)
    video   Diagnosing lupus and awareness about the disease has greatly improved in the past 30 years, which has allowed patients to learn how to best manage their disease to lead relatively normal lives.

  •  
  • U-M study works to take the heat off menopause (02/03/03)
    video  Breast cancer oncologists at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center have been searching for alternative to treating hot flashes with estrogen - by studying a popular drug type used for the treatment of depression.

  •  
  • Yo-yo dieting linked to poor post-menopause heart health (02/03/03)
    video  Women who gain and/or lose at least 10 pounds in a yearlong period at least five times over a lifetime may be setting themselves up for heart problems after menopause, a new study finds.

  •  
back to top
 

January 2003

back to top
 

Newsroom HOME

Contact Media Team

Join the Media List

Search Releases & Clips

UMHS Facts & Figures

Background Info

Video/Audio/Images

Our Publications

FAQs for Media

 

U-M Medical School
| Hospitals & Health Centers | U-M Gateway

University of Michigan Health System
1500 E. Medical Center Drive  Ann Arbor, MI 48109   734-936-4000
(c) copyright 2005 Regents of the University of Michigan
Developed & maintained by: Public Relations & Marketing Communications
Contact UMHS


The University of Michigan Health System web site does not provide specific medical advice and does not endorse any medical or professional service obtained through information provided on this site or any links to this site.
Complete disclaimer and Privacy Statement

UMHS HOME

Health Topics A-Z

For Patients & Families

For Health Providers

Search Tools & Index