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December 2004

  • Study investigates value of 'center of excellence' (12/27/04)
    A new study by University of Michigan Health System researchers says cancer surgery performed at a medical center designated by the National Cancer Institute as a “center of excellence” is associated with less risk of death soon after surgery than if performed at a high-volume surgery center, but finds no difference in five-year survival rates.

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  • Avoiding Winter Injury Hazards (12/23/04)
    video  As the snowflakes start to fall, many emergency rooms become busy with injuries specific to the winter months. An expert cautions us on common winter hazards and how to avoid them.

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  • Feeling dizzy? Like your head is spinning? (12/23/04)
    video  Imagine what it would be like to feel that dizzy and off-balance for minutes, hours, days — or even years. This kind of serious dizziness, called vertigo, makes life miserable for millions of people each year, and keeps some from driving or working. It starts without warning for no apparent reason, and comes and goes. But, it doesn’t have to be this way.

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  • Giving up the diet resolution (12/23/04)
    video  America seems to be a country on a diet. At any one time, more than 25 percent of men and 45 percent of women are dieting, yet the United States has the highest incidence of obesity in the world. Here are some suggestions to make your New Year’s resolutions stick and help ensure 2005 is the year we abandon the “diet mindset” to controlling our eating decisions.

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  • It's the gut, stupid! Healthy mix of GI tract microbes are key to preventing allergies and asthma. (12/23/04)
    If you want to avoid allergies or asthma, scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School suggest you start paying more attention to what's in your gut.

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  • Obesity growing as health concern for people with spinal cord injury (12/23/04)
    video  Researchers at the University of Michigan Health System are looking at how people with spinal cord injury burn calories and how that is affected by their muscle mass and body weight. The goal is to make better recommendations to people with spinal cord injury, but the research will also translate into greater understanding of obesity in the general population as well.

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  • Pay bills or pay for medications? (12/23/04)
    video  Recently, researchers at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and the U-M Health System have been taking a closer look at the health consequences patients face when they are unable to pay for their prescribed medications, and how health care providers are helping patients get the medication assistance they need.

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  • Cigarette smoking among American teens continues eight-year decline (12/21/04)
    Smoking rates among American teens continue to decline, with the proportion who are current smokers in 2004 down from recent peak levels in the mid-1990s by one-half among the nation’s 8th and 10th graders and by a third among its 12th graders.

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  • Overall teen drug use continues gradual decline; but use of inhalants rises (12/21/04)
    The proportion of American 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-grade students who reported using any illicit drug in the prior 12 months continued a gradual decline in 2004, according to the latest national survey of 50,000 students in the Monitoring the Future study.

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  • UPDATE: What should naproxen patients do now? (12/21/04)
    On December 20, the Food & Drug Administration issued an announcement advising people who take an over-the-counter painkilling drug called naproxen (sold as Aleve) to pay attention to instructions on the label and not exceed the maximum recommended dose of 220 milligrams twice daily for more than 10 days without consulting a physician.

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  • VA beats others for adult medical care (12/21/04)
    Patients enrolled in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health system are significantly more likely than similar patients in the general population to receive preventive and chronic care recommended by well-established national standards, according to a new study released today by researchers from the RAND Corporation, the VA and the University of Michigan

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  • M-CARE’s M-CAID HMO receives NCQA “Top 10” rating (12/20/04)
    The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) has named M-CAID, M-CARE’s Medicaid program, a "Top 10" Medicaid company. This first-of-its-kind national rating recognizes plans that, in 2003, performed at an extraordinarily high level.

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  • What should Celebrex and Bextra patients do? (12/17/04)
    Today's announcement that Celebrex, a popular pain drug in the same family as Vioxx, has been found to pose an increased risk of heart problems is bound to leave many pain patients stunned, confused and worried.

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  • Heart disease, work performance, mental health all connected (12/15/04)
    People's perceptions of the severity of their heart illness play an important role in how well they're able to perform at work—that's not necessarily the same thing as their physical symptoms. That's one of the main findings from a new paper by researchers at the U-M College of Pharmacy and the U-M Cardiovascular Center.

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  • Good for your heart, good for your mind? (12/14/04)
    Could the same actions that help prevent a heart attack or stroke also prevent or slow the memory loss, confusion and thinking problems of dementia? A new study suggests that for many people, the answer could be yes.

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  • Informed consent project launched (12/14/04)
    A new $1.5 million U-M initiative will help researchers improve the way they explain research studies to potential participants, and ask their consent to participate. It may serve as a model for other research institutions.

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  • U-M leads drug-related liver damage study (12/14/04)
    A number of medicines and herbal remedies can harm the liver, and doctors don't understand why. A new study co-led by U-M doctors will enroll people who have suffered such drug-induced liver damage to try to solve the mystery.

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  • U-M shares $13.4M cancer grant (12/14/04)
    The U-M Health System and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle will lead two cancer research teams in a $13.4 million effort funded by the National Cancer Institute to accelerate the study of proteins important in cancer.

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  • Initiative maximizes health, independence for people with SCI in rural Mich (12/13/04)
    The U-M Spinal Cord Injury Rural Health Education Initiative, created by the University of Michigan Health System’s Model Spinal Cord Injury Care System, is working to change the common belief that living in a smaller community means people with SCI should have less access to health care providers who specialize in SCI and fewer, if any, transportation and work resources available to them."

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  • MVN offers meningitis shots to Hajj travelers (12/13/04)
    To protect travelers who are making the Hajj and to help them meet entry requirements in Saudi Arabia, the University of Michigan Health System’s Michigan Visiting Nurses is offering vaccinations against bacterial meningitis on an appointment basis at its Ann Arbor office.

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  • Chemical cousin of anti-anxiety drugs holds promise for psoriasis treatment (12/08/04)
    A new drug candidate previously shown to reduce harmful side effects of the autoimmune disease lupus also may be useful in treating psoriasis.

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  • Is your New Year’s resolution to lose weight? (12/07/04)
    The Hunger Within 12-week workshop guides participants through an intensive program, unlocking the psychological barriers to permanent weight loss. Join a session this January and make your new year's resolution a lifetime change for the better.

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  • Teddy bear hosts fundraiser for Trauma Burn (12/06/04)
    Michigan-based Chelsea Teddy Bear Company is conducting a fundraiser at its six retail stores to help send burn-injured children treated at the University of Michigan Trauma Burn Center to Kids Burn Camp. This medically-based camp was specifically designed for children ages 8 to 17 who have survived devastating burn injuries.

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  • Does quitting smoking really make you gain 10 pounds? (12/01/04)
    If your New Year's resolution is to quit smoking, conventional wisdom says you'll probably put on five or 10 pounds.

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November 2004

  • Biopsy technique assesses breast cancer's spread (11/29/04)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found a new non-surgical technique can help doctors determine when breast cancer has invaded the lymph nodes, sparing some women an extra trip to the operating room.

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  • Computer helps diagnosis lung cancer (11/29/04)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center are developing computer-aided diagnosis methods to help radiologists assess the texture, borders and shape of a nodule in the lungs to determine if it is lung cancer or a benign growth.

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  • Med School receives $5.9-million NIH grant to study anthrax (11/29/04)
    The U-M Medical School has been awarded a $5.9-million contract from NIH for a Biodefense Proteomics Research Center.

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  • Nutcracker performance to benefit Mott campaign (11/24/04)
    On Dec. 17, the Ann Arbor Ballet Theatre will host a special production of the Nutcracker ballet to benefit the U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital's "Champions for Children" campaign.

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  • ‘Virtual surgery’ simulations help train tomorrow’s surgeons (11/23/04)
    video  The rigors of medical school teach the information required to become a physician, but when it comes to surgery, the greatest teacher is experience. Traditional surgical training is done through a type of immersive apprenticeship, with experienced surgeons teaching residents in the operating room over a period of years. Now, doctors-in-training can practice their skills on extremely realistic procedural simulators, including those designed for developing surgical skills. These sophisticated simulators mimic the look – and even the feel – of performing an actual surgical procedure, allowing surgical trainees to practice techniques before they ever reach the operating room.

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  • Avoid those holiday ‘gimmes’ (11/23/04)
    video  The gift giving that usually accompanies the holiday season can be a wonderful time for friends and family, but for many parents, holiday gift giving can be a struggle of wills with their children. By setting limits this season, you can teach your children there’s more to the holidays than gifts.

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  • Follow these Tips for a Happy, Safe Holiday (11/23/04)
    video  The holiday season is always a fun and festive time for friends and family. With all the parties and decorations, food, toys and icy roads, the holidays can also be a time of potential hazards, especially for children. So this holiday season, before you throw the party, buy the toy, decorate the house or run that last errand, be sure you know how to keep yourself, your family and your friends safe through all the hustle and bustle.

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  • Home and healthy for the holidays (11/23/04)
    video  Life-saving advancements in neonatal medicine are coming at a time when the number of babies born prematurely is on the rise. Of the 4 million live births last year in the United States, about 300,000 babies were born prematurely. Amazing advancements in neonatal medicine in the past 5 to 10 years are now making it possible for these babies to survive. "

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  • We wish you a Merry (achoo!) Christmas and a (sniffle) Happy New Year! (cough, cough) (11/23/04)
    video  This year’s “holiday rush” of colds and flu may be especially bad because of the shortage of flu vaccine. But there are simple and specific things you can do to keep yourself from getting — or giving — this most unwelcome holiday gift. And if you do get a cold or the flu, there are some basic things to know about taking care of yourself and your loved ones — including when to go to the ER.

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  • $44M gift will accelerate search for Type I diabetes cure (11/22/04)
    The University of Michigan announced today that it will launch a new and comprehensive initiative aimed at accelerating the search for a cure for Type 1 diabetes. The initiative will be enabled by a private donation of $44 million — the largest gift ever for the U-M Health System, and the second-largest gift in U-M history.

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  • Register for Women's Football Academy (11/19/04)
    Registration is now open for the University of Michigan’s Women’s Football Academy, which will be held Saturday, June 18, 2005. The highly popular annual event is a day of learning and playing football. It’s for women only, and no prior football experience or knowledge is necessary.

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  • Autism: Why do some develop then regress? (11/18/04)
    Most children with autism show developmental differences early in life, usually involving their ability to communicate. But new University of Michigan research examines the 20 to 40 percent of youngsters who appear to develop communication skills, then regress.

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  • Karin Muraszko named Neurosurgery chair (11/18/04)
    The University of Michigan Medical School has appointed pediatric neurosurgeon Karin Muraszko, M.D., chair of the Neurosurgery Department. Muraszko, who joined the U-M faculty in 1990, will be the first woman in the country to chair an academic neurosurgery department.

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  • Mott benefit game hosts all-star hockey line-up (11/18/04)
    Hockey fans, the long wait is finally over! Some of hockey's greatest and best-known players - Chris Chelios, Nicklas Lidstrom, Aaron Ward, Manny Legacy and Kris Draper - will be hitting the ice again. But this time, instead of just scoring goals for their teams, they'll be working hard to score funds for the Champions for Children campaign to build a new children's and women's hospital.

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  • U-M hosts all-star hockey line-up at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital benefit game (11/18/04)
    video  On Dec. 2, some of the biggest names in pro hockey will hit the ice in Ann Arbor to support U-M’s campaign to build a new children’s and women’s hospital

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  • Smokeout showdown: U-M vs. EMU (11/16/04)
    On Nov. 18, the University of Michigan and Eastern Michigan University will compete to see which campus can get the most students, faculty and staff to commit to quit tobacco use for one day as part of November's Great American Smokeout.

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  • Diabetes among older Americans cost $133.5 billion in 1990s (11/15/04)
    Diabetes is harming the nation’s economy as well as its health, according to a University of Michigan study showing that lost productivity among diabetic Americans born between 1931 and 1941 cost the country nearly $133.5 billion by the year 2000."

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  • M-CARE receives NCQA Excellent Accreditation for fifth consecutive year (11/12/04)
    M-CARE continues to hold an Excellent Accreditation from the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) for its Commercial and Medicaid HMO health plans. The not-for-profit managed care organization, owned by the University of Michigan, has maintained the highest rating possible in every year since 2000.

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  • $3-million NIH grant for training in regenerative science (11/11/04)
    University of Michigan scientists have received a $3-million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a new interdisciplinary program to train tomorrow’s leaders in regenerative science.

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  • Heart patients helped by ICDs (11/09/04)
    Implanted devices that help shock a failing heart back into rhythm reduce the risk of death for heart patients, but some patients will get more benefit from them than others. That's the conclusion of two new studies presented today at the American Heart Association meeting by a U-M team.

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  • Women lag in emergency heart treatment (11/09/04)
    In a heart attack, the saying goes, “Time is muscle.” The faster a person gets treated, the better his or her chances of survival and recovery. But a new study finds that women who have heart attacks wait longer than men to receive emergency angioplasty. And the longer any patient waits for this treatment, the higher his or her chances are of dying before leaving the hospital.

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  • "For Our Daughters" performance (11/05/04)
    The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center will sponsor a performance on Nov. 18 of “For Our Daughters,” a theatrical production that combines live stage acting and singing with filmed interviews with breast cancer survivors and family members.

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  • Exercise cuts early death risk (11/05/04)
    Adults who are physically active in their 50s and early 60s are about 35 percent less likely to die in the next eight years than those who are sedentary, a new U-M/VA study finds. For those who have a high heart risk because of diabetes, high blood pressure or smoking, the reduction is 45 percent. And you don’t have to run marathons - - walking, gardening, or dancing a few times a week might do it.

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  • Asthma on the home front: Know your triggers and clear the air (11/04/04)
    video  Over the past 20 years, self-reported cases of asthma have increased by 74 percent. In that same time, the number of asthma-related office visits has doubled and the number of asthma-related deaths has increased by 61 percent. With more than 31 million adults and children who have asthma in the United States alone, the need to educate the public in ways to prevent attacks is critical. Learning what triggers your asthma attacks and asthma-proofing your home are the key to maintaining control over this life-long condition.

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  • Malpractice forum Nov. 23 (11/04/04)
    From the operating room to the exam room to the court room, malpractice and other medical-legal issues will be in the spotlight at a Nov. 23 event at the U-M Health System that will feature top local and national experts.

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  • Senior Drivers: Assess your driving before hanging up the keys (11/04/04)
    video  For many seniors, the thought of hanging up the car keys might feel like an end to independence. But when the fatality rate per mile driven for older drivers — those aged 85 years and older — is nine times higher than the rate for drivers aged 25 to 69 years, it becomes a problem that seniors and their loved ones can no longer ignore.

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  • The Fab Four of heart drugs could help you “Get Back” to health (11/04/04)
    video  Listen -- do you want to know a secret? Do you promise not to tell? The Fab Four are back, and they’re heading straight for the hearts of millions. It’s enough to make you want to “Twist and Shout”! This Fab Four is a combination of four kinds of medicines that can protect the heart — and maybe save the life — of almost anyone who has ever had a heart attack or chest pain. But many of those who could benefit from this drug combo haven’t heard the news.

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  • Tips for traveling with diabetes (11/04/04)
    video  The busiest travel season of the year will find many Americans packing their bags for places near and far. But for individuals with diabetes travel can be challenging. With a little planning, you can have fun on your trip, enjoy yourself and not run into problems.

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  • U-M celebrates 40 years of organ transplant (11/04/04)
    Forty years ago, U-M surgeons performed the state's first organ transplant, removing a kidney from a teenage girl and transplanting it into her gravely ill identical twin sister. This weekend, those twins and 800 other donors, recipients and transplant team members will gather in Ann Arbor to celebrate 40 years of transplants, and transplant research, at U-M.

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  • First human trial of bioartificial kidney shows promise (11/02/04)
    The first test in humans of a bioartificial kidney offers hope of the device’s potential to save the lives of people with acute renal failure, researchers at the University of Michigan Health System report.

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  • GENDER AND SEX HORMONES AFFECT THE BRAIN'S PAIN RESPONSE AND MORE, ACCORDING TO NEW STUDIES (11/01/04)
    Scientists are now uncovering increasing evidence that the brain not only responds to hormones produced by the reproductive system, but that these hormones—the so-called “female hormones,” estrogen and progestin, and the “male” androgens, such as testosterone—play an important role in the development of differences between male and female brains.

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  • How cozy should universities and industry get? (11/01/04)
    On Nov. 17, the 9th annual Waggoner Lecture on Ethics and Values in Medicine will explore the relationship between industry and universities, especially in the area of biomedical research.

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  • Treatment sometimes absent for children of mothers with mental illness (11/01/04)
    Children who have a mother diagnosed with a mental illness are at risk of psychiatric and behavioral problems, yet these children often fail to receive needed services, a new University of Michigan study indicates.

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October 2004

  • Labor Takes Longer For Overweight and Obese Women, Study Finds (10/29/04)
    Pregnant women who are overweight or obese progress through labor more slowly than do normal weight women, according to a study by researchers at the University of North Carolina and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health.

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  • Taking it to the "Max" for Mott (10/28/04)
    After losing her husband and then her young son 18 months later, Yvonne DeVries, along with daughter Dominique, decided to turn her personal tragedy into a healing experience that would help others in need by creating the fundraising venture "Max to the Millions," in memory of her son, Max. "Max to the Millions" will benefit the patients and families at U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital's Holden Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

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  • Religious faith shortens hospital stays, (10/27/04)
    Religious faith and the power of prayer gives people a sense of confidence, hope, optimism and sense of control over ailments and other issues in life, according to a new University of Michigan study of patients undergoing open-heart surgery.

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  • M GO BLUE for Mott wrist band campaign underway (10/26/04)
    The U-M Athletic Department and C.S. Mott Children's Hospital have teamed to raise awareness and funding for the "Champions for Children" campaign currently underway to build a new children's and women's hospital at the University of Michigan. Blue wrist bands with the words "M GO BLUE for Mott" will be on sale for $2, with $1 of the proceeds benefiting the campaign, starting Saturday, Oct. 30, at the Michigan vs. Michigan State football game.

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  • Smoking alters brain's (10/26/04)
    U-M scientists have found the first evidence that smoking tobacco alters the flow of the brain's own natural "feel good" chemicals, the same ones that are affected by heroin and morphine. The discovery, made using brain scans, may help explain why smoking produces certain feelings, and why it's so addictive. "

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  • Scientists identify E. coli genes that cause urinary tract infections (10/25/04)
    During July of 2003, Jennifer Snyder spent 10 days trying to get 40 laboratory mice to urinate into little plastic tubes. Her goal was to extract enough genetic material from mouse urine to determine which of the 5,611 genes in a pathogenic strain of E.coli bacteria were turned on, or expressed, in mice with urinary tract infections.

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  • Immune system in a bottle could help prevent flu vaccine shortage (10/24/04)
    Picture a honeycomb and each compartment in the honeycomb is coated with living cells from a person’s mouth, skin or a piece of bone.

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  • Common gout drug shown to reduce risk from colorectal cancer (10/21/04)
    A commonly prescribed drug used to treat gout may also offer some protection against colorectal cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan and in Israel.

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  • Parenting guru speaks at U-M (10/19/04)
    Noted pediatrician and best-selling author Harvey Karp, M.D., who has help many parents calm their babies and toddlers using techniques based on early-childhood brain research, will give a public lecture at the U-M on Monday, Oct. 25. He'll also speak at a two-day child abuse prevention conference sponsored by the U-M Health System.

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  • Study: Post-polio women experience menopause differently (10/18/04)
    A team of researchers from the U-M Health System conducted a nationwide study to explore the experience of menopause for the 500,000 women in the U.S. with a history of polio. The study revealed post-polio women experience more severe menopause symptoms than their non-disabled peers.

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  • Three U-M faculty selected for IOM membership (10/18/04)
    Three University of Michigan faculty members were among 65 new members of the prestigious Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, including two from the U-M Medical School.

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  • U-M Congenital Heart Center Hosts 12th annual Save A Heart Celebration (10/15/04)
    A fall feast of fine wine and gourmet food will help some of the nation's smallest heart patients when the Congenital Heart Center at University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital hosts the 12th annual Save A Heart Celebration of Wine & Food. The celebration will be held on Friday, Nov. 12, at 6:30 p.m. in the Michigan League, located at 911 N. University in Ann Arbor.

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  • Depressed brains different, study finds (10/14/04)
    The brains of people with severe depression have lower levels of several related molecules that are key to the development, organization, growth and repair of the brain than the brains of people without the disease, or those with the bipolar form of depression, a new study finds.

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  • Walk/Run to benefit Coach Carr Cancer Fund (10/14/04)
    For an opportunity to meet U-M Football coaches and players while raising money for the Coach Carr Cancer Fund, join the MFit and M REC Sports Almost 5K Walk/Run at the Central Campus Recreation Building 9 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 6. Personal training demonstrations, nutritional counseling and tours of the CCRB will be available.

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  • Study hones improvements in lung function in premature infants (10/13/04)
    Using a device already used in the neonatal intensive care unit to monitor lung function in premature infants, University of Michigan Health System researchers have taken a step in helping neonatal specialists administer a substance that helps babies breathe easier.

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  • U-M experts available to discuss stem cell research (10/13/04)
    Presidential and vice presidential candidates are sparring about the potential of human embryonic stem cell research, placing stem cells in the media spotlight. Two U-M Medical School experts are available today to discuss the science and the policy.

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  • U-M helps lead major Alzheimer's study (10/13/04)
    U-M Alzheimer's disease experts will help lead a new $60 million national effort to better understand, diagnose and treat the memory-stealing disease, which affects 4 million Americans. The U-M's expertise in a form of brain imaging called PET scanning will be crucial to the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

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  • Estrogen protects male rats from aortic aneurysms (10/12/04)
    When it comes to abdominal aortic aneurysms - life-threatening bulges or weak areas in the main artery feeding blood to the lower half of the body - new U-M research shows that it is definitely better to be female.

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  • Kellogg Eye Center #6 in nation (10/11/04)
    The University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center was named one of the Best Overall Programs in ophthalmology in an annual survey conducted by Ophthalmology Times. The Eye Center was ranked sixth in the Best Overall program category by chairs and residency directors of ophthalmology departments across the country.

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  • Oct. 29 event looks at Bush/Kerry health plans (10/08/04)
    On Friday, Oct. 29, representatives from the presidential campaigns of George W. Bush and John F. Kerry will appear at U-M to present the health plans put forth by their candidates. A panel of experts will discuss how those plans might affect patients, health care providers, insurance companies, employers and government.

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  • U-M scientists see ubiquitin-modified proteins in living cells (10/08/04)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School and Howard Hughes Medical Institute have found a way to see proteins in cells that have been tagged by a molecular “sticky note” called ubiquitin."

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  • Why do African-American women have more pregnancy problems? (10/08/04)
    Researchers know little about why pregnancy and infant health differ by race, despite massive efforts to address this persistent problem. Now, researchers at the University of Michigan will examine the issue from an interdisciplinary perspective to help solve this problem.

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  • 1 in 6 ill seniors cut drugs due to cost (10/06/04)
    One in every six chronically ill older adults has cut back on prescription medications because they have problems paying for them, even though most have some prescription drug coverage in their health insurance, a new U-M and VA study shows.

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  • Trauma Burn, local FD team to teach kids about fire prevention (10/05/04)
    As part of National Fire Prevention Week, the U-M Trauma Burn Center will partner with the Dundee Volunteer Fire Department to teach kids about home fire prevention and safety.

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  • U-M team treating mouth wounds by engineering tissue grafts (10/05/04)
    Mich.—University of Michigan researchers are testing a new procedure in which they can take a tiny piece of a person's mouth lining, grow it into a dollar-bill sized piece of tissue and graft that expanded piece into the donor's mouth to heal a wound.

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  • Shorter, cheaper, fewer hospital stays for kids (10/04/04)
    Researchers from the U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital report that they've been able to improve the quality of hospital stays for kids with asthma, while shortening the length of those stays and educating parents to prevent repeat visits. They did it by checking Mott's performance against a national database of information specific to kids' illnesses, and finding ways to improve care at Mott.

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  • Warm weather boosts mood, broadens the mind (10/04/04)
    Get out—for at least 30 minutes. The positive impact warm, sunny weather can have on mental health and mood are real, according to new University of Michigan research.

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  • Blood test provides window into treatment of advanced breast cancer (10/01/04)
    video  A new blood test could change the way doctors treat women whose breast cancer has spread to other parts of their body. Using a technology that separates the cancer cells circulating in the blood of women with metastatic breast cancer, doctors are able to count these cells and determine within just three to four weeks whether a new treatment is working.

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  • Candy’s not the only Halloween safety concern (10/01/04)
    video  While many parents painstakingly inspect the pounds of sugary loot brought home each Halloween, they need to keep in mind that candy tampering isn’t the largest concern they face.

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  • Cottonseed drug boosts cancer treatment in mice (10/01/04)
    A drug refined from cottonseed oil and previously tried and abandoned as a male contraceptive could boost the effectiveness of treatment for prostate cancer and possibly other common cancers as well.

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  • Life after Vioxx - what to do? (10/01/04)
    The removal of Vioxx from the market has many pain and arthritis patients wondering what to do, but U-M experts say your heart and your gut (literally!) can guide you and your doctor to decide what medicine or combination of medicines are right for you.

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  • Reducing the risk of a second heart attack (10/01/04)
    video  Each year, approximately 1.2 million Americans suffer a heart attack. Of these, about 500, 000 have already had at least one heart attack. Research consistently shows that aggressively making changes to risk factors can reduce the likelihood of coronary artery disease. Making lifestyle changes is an important tool for people who have had a heart attack and who are willing to follow through with new heart-healthy habits to avoid another cardiac event.

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  • U-M performs 1,000th cochlear implant (10/01/04)
    Today, the Cochlear Implant Program at the University of Michigan Health System will reach a new milestone when Steven A. Telian, M.D., Medical Director of the Cochlear Implant Program, implants the 1,000th cochlear implant recipient. To celebrate, the program will host a two-part event on Oct. 2 at U-M.

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  • Vote early, vote often (10/01/04)
    video  When kids are engaged in society, research suggests they may be less likely to experiment with risky behaviors like drugs and violence, and more likely to feel better about themselves and about helping their community. You have to start early, and reinforce the message by repeating it often.

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September 2004

  • Asking teens to chart life events helps explain risky decisions (09/24/04)
    Kristy Martyn started out using a detailed timeline of teen-aged girls’ lives as an easy way to track their demographics for research purposes.

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  • How individuals handle victory impacts ability to learn, hormonal levels (09/24/04)
    Some people are more comfortable losing than winning. Others get so depressed or angry if they lose, they don't learn from their mistakes, a University of Michigan study says.

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  • Walk benefits suicide & depression prevention (09/16/04)
    On Sunday, Sept. 26, hundreds of people whose lives have been touched by the depression or suicide of a loved one will walk to raise money for education and prevention programs. The annual "Out of the Darkness...Into the Light" walk is sponsored by the U-M Depression Center and the Ann Arbor chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

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  • Annual race/walk to benefit U-M neurological research (09/15/04)
    The University of Michigan’s Program for Understanding Neurological Diseases, or PFUND, will host its second annual race/walk on Oct. 2, 2004. Participants can choose to race or walk the 5K route.

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  • Immune system genes also help eyes (09/15/04)
    U-M Kellogg Eye Center scientists have learned that a family of genes long known to be integral to the immune system also plays a role in vision, perhaps preventing certain blinding diseases.

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  • Paintball injuries can happen in the blink of an eye (09/15/04)
    Paintball injuries are sending more and more patients to the emergency room every year, including one teenager who wandered into his neighbor’s backyard at just the wrong moment.

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  • Patenting life and its parts: Davenport Lecture (09/15/04)
    Daniel J. Kevles, Ph.D., will deliver the fourth annual Horace W. Davenport Lecture in the Medical Humanities. His talk, which is sponsored by the University of Michigan Center for the History of Medicine, takes place Thursday, Oct. 7, at 4 p.m. in Ford Auditorium.

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  • Researcher looks at racial identity as part of healthy lifestyle (09/15/04)
    Ken Resnicow has worked with Black churches for more than a decade to foster healthy behavior among their members, including quitting smoking, getting more physical activity and eating healthier.

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  • Revitalizing the spirit of end-of-life care (09/14/04)
    On Sept. 17, the U-M Health System, Saint Joseph Mercy Health System and Hospice of Michigan will together host “Palliative Care: Revitalizing the Spirit of Health Care." The conference will provide the community and health care professionals with insight on how to make a patient's final days as meaningful and comfortable as many of life’s other events."

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  • Patients don't tell doctors about Rx cost problems (09/13/04)
    A majority of chronically ill patients don't tell their doctors before they cut back on their prescription medicines because of cost, even though their doctors might be able to prescribe less expensive drugs or help them find assistance, a new VA/U-M study finds. Patients need to be open about their problems paying for the medicines their doctors prescribe.

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  • U-M scientist receives prestigious White House award (09/10/04)
    University of Michigan researcher Sean Morrison, Ph.D., received a top award this week from the U.S. government. At a ceremony Sept. 9 at the White House, Morrison was recognized with a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

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  • Workshop explores healthy lifestyle changes on Oct. 2 (09/09/04)
    The UMHS I M Well Program will host a day-long experiential workshop entitled “Becoming Active in Your Own Health – An Integrative Medicine Workshop” on Saturday, Oct. 2. The workshop is designed for individuals looking to make healthy lifestyle changes.

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  • Reporter tipsheet on pain (09/08/04)
    All this month, U-M medical staff and patients will learn about innovations in pain research and treatment, as part of Pain Awareness Month. This tipsheet of story ideas can help reporters cover this important, and often overlooked, topic.

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  • Spanking can lead to more bad behavior by children (09/08/04)
    A new University of Michigan study that used stronger statistical controls than previous research lends additional support against corporal punishment, saying the effects can be detrimental to children.

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  • Chicken pox vaccine works (09/07/04)
    Since its introduction in the mid-1990s, the childhood chicken pox (varicella) vaccine has saved society hundreds of millions of dollars in hospital costs, and kept even unvaccinated teens and adults from getting the disease, a new U-M study finds.

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  • Sportswriter awarded for combating stigma of depression (09/07/04)
    he University of Michigan Depression Center and the Mental Illness Research Association will present its annual National Media Award to Eric Adelson, a reporter for ESPN The Magazine. The award recognizes an individual reporter or editor whose work has helped to decrease the stigma associated with mental illness.

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  • U-M research looks at obesity, exercise and spinal cord injury (09/07/04)
    As Americans face a growing epidemic of obesity, people with spinal cord injuries find themselves particularly vulnerable to the serious complications that come with carrying around extra pounds. U-M researchers have begun several new studies to look at how people with spinal cord injury burn calories, why their energy expenditure is different and how to deal with the disproportionate rate of obesity among these patients.

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  • A bond of brothers: Siblings and prostate cancer (09/01/04)
    video  Ongoing research at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center is looking at men diagnosed with prostate cancer and their unaffected brothers to help determine what genes are involved, if siblings realized they were at higher risk and what they are doing about it.

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  • A lesson in heart health (09/01/04)
    video  Unhealthy eating habits, coupled with the rising rate of obesity among America’s children, have lead experts to come together to teach students a very important lesson: how to lead a heart-healthy lifestyle to reduce their future risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

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  • The long journey of caregiving: Caring for the caregiver (09/01/04)
    video  Caregiving without help over a long period of time takes its toll emotionally, physically and financially. U-M expert offers caregivers who are going through a stressful situation suggestions on how to look for people who can help.

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  • U-M doctors get under the skin of acne patients to find new clues to better treatment (09/01/04)
    video  University of Michigan researchers are working to defeat acne by understanding it better on a molecular level, and testing new ideas about how to treat it. They’ve enlisted armies of volunteers in their efforts to explore acne’s roots in the cells and chemicals under the surface of the skin, and to try new combinations of pills, creams and other potential therapies.

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August 2004

  • Candidates Forum on Children’s Issues planned (08/31/04)
    The U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital will host a candidate forum on Sept. 30 to help voters determine who's for kids and who's just kidding.

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  • Take the MFit Charity Challenge (08/31/04)
    The MFit Health Promotion Division will begin the second annual MFit Charity Challenge: Train with the Team program on Oct. 11. This six-week, team-oriented fitness program gets participants moving toward a healthier lifestyle, and also benefits the Coach Carr Cancer Fund.

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  • Strep disrupts blood clotting to infect humans (08/26/04)
    University of Michigan researchers have captured a glimpse of the endless arms race between infectious agents and the human immune system in a bacterium that uses a mimic of a human blood-clotting enzyme to advance its infection.

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  • New research registry & fund for chronic pain diseases (08/24/04)
    A new clinical trials registry and research fund at the U-M Health System will help doctors better understand and treat chronic pain and fatigue conditions ranging from fibromyalgia and Gulf War Veterans Illness to chronic fatigue syndrome and vulvodynia.

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  • U-M nurses ratify new contract (08/24/04)
    The U-M Health System Registered Nurses, represented by the Michigan Nurses Association, have agreed to a new four-year contract. The MNA's 3,000 member Staff Council, the University of Michigan Professional Nurse Council, approved the contract by a 4 to 1 margin in an election with the highest turnout in the union's history.

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  • Conference tackles ethnic health disparities (08/18/04)
    On Sept. 15, the UMHS Program for Multicultural Health will host a community conference in the Michigan League in Ann Arbor to find new and creative approaches to improve the quality of minority health care.""

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  • Tumor cells in blood predict advanced breast cancer treatment success (08/18/04)
    Women with advanced breast cancer who have a higher number of tumor cells circulating in their blood progress more rapidly and die sooner than women with fewer of these cells.

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  • U-M tackles 'allergy cell' disease (08/18/04)
    The U-M has started a new clinic and clinical trial for people with mastocytosis, a family of diseases in which allergy cells reproduce wildly and create reactions that can range from a persistent rash and tiny red skin bumps to repeated episodes of life-threatening anaphylactic shock or leukemia-like symptoms.

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  • Parents' asthma actions fall short (08/17/04)
    Parents are trying to help their kids avoid substances that could trigger their asthma, but they're not always succeeding, a new U-M study shows. More needs to be done to help parents take all the steps that could help their kids, and not waite time or money on ones that won't.

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  • VA beats managed care for diabetes (08/17/04)
    Nearly a decade after the Department of Veterans Affairs initiated expansive improvements in how it cares for veterans with chronic illnesses, a new multicenter study finds VA patients with diabetes are more likely to receive recommended tests and have better outcomes than managed care patients.

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  • Aug. 28 motorcycle ride to benefit Mott (08/16/04)
    On Saturday, Aug. 28, the distinct roar of thunder will be heard heading down the road toward the U-M C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, as local motorcyclists rev up for a community ride and outdoor celebration to benefit the U-M Health System’s campaign to build a new children’s and women’s hospital.

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  • U-M researcher to hold international fellowship (08/16/04)
    Lois M. Verbrugge, Ph.D., M.P.H., research professor and Senior Distinguished Research Scientist of the Institute of Gerontology in the U-M Geriatrics Center, has been awarded an international fellowship in the Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore.

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  • Pepsi cans to highlight U-M neurological research (08/12/04)
    Information about the U-M's Program for Understanding Neurological Diseases, including the Web address, will appear on the sides of some 6 million cans of Caffeine-Free Diet Pepsi between now and September.

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  • Seniors need to socialize to keep communication skills (08/12/04)
    Senior citizens living alone and independently in apartments should interact often with others—both friends and family members—if they want to maintain their ability to communicate, a new University of Michigan study showed.

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  • Mexican-Americans have higher stroke risk (08/09/04)
    Mexican-Americans have a far higher chance of suffering a stroke than non-Hispanic whites, according to a new study led by a U-M stroke specialist. And the difference doesn?t appear to be related to Mexican-Americans' higher incidence of diabetes, which had been thought to raise their risk of a certain type of stroke.

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  • Common virus may be linked to prostate cancer (08/05/04)
    New research by scientists at the U-M Medical School suggests the intriguing possibility that a common virus called BK may play a role in prostate cancer - the second-leading cause of deaths from cancer in American men.

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  • U-M football coach, Regent to co-chair Mott campaign (08/05/04)
    U-M head football coach Lloyd Carr and U-M Regent David Brandon, along with wives Laurie and Jan, are making official their commitment to the future of children’s health at U-M by becoming the co-chairs of the U-M Health System’s campaign to build a new children’s and women’s hospital.

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  • Patients find tiny, high-tech cameras easy to swallow (08/04/04)
    Using new non-invasive technology, known as a capsule endoscopy system, physicians at the U-M Health System now have the ability to explore uncharted, and often unseen, territory within a patient’s small intestines to diagnose obscure conditions.

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  • Breastfeeding: Safe, sound, sustainable (08/02/04)
    As part of World Breastfeeding Week (Aug. 1 – Aug. 7), the UMHS Birth Center’s Lactation Team is sharing its success and spreading the word about the health, emotional and financial benefits of lactation to encourage even more moms in Michigan to initiate breastfeeding.

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  • Exercise: It’s never too late to improve your fitness (08/02/04)
    video  For many older adults, even a walk to the car tires them easily. A research program is measuring the effects of a moderate intensity aerobic exercise program among older adults. Through aerobic circuit-training, these older men and women will help researchers determine if this type of exercise program can help older men and women more easily perform basic tasks of daily living.

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  • Heavy drinking by college students poses many serious dangers, U-M expert warns (08/02/04)
    video  As American college students gear up to head back to campus later this month, they’ll look forward to all the usual college traditions: football games, late-night discussions, and pizza with new friends after classes. But almost half of all college students share a tradition that could wreck their futures: heavy alcohol drinking that puts them at risk for everything from bad grades and date rape to fights, serious injuries and even death.

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  • Olympics have you inspired? Preventing sports injuries (08/02/04)
    video  As the summer Olympics get underway, many of us will be inspired to run, jump, bike and swim just like our Olympic heroes. But some weekend athletes can exercise themselves into sports-related injuries. A sports medicine expert offers advice to wanna-be Olympians and weekend athletes.

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  • Potentially dangerous staph infections spreading (08/02/04)
    video  Staph bacteria are not uncommon in health care settings. In fact, they account for a large number of hospital-related infections each year. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of these types of bacteria which is now found among athletes, military recruits and others in the general population. What is particularly concerning to medical experts is that MRSA is resistant to many common antibiotics.

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  • Steroid abuse not just an Olympic problem (08/02/04)
    video  Every athlete wants to run as fast as Michael Johnson, vault as powerfully as Mary Lou Retton or hit a baseball like Mark McGwire. But as the 2004 Summer Olympics approach, one expert cautions teens and weekend athletes not to turn to performance-enhancing steroids to reach their gold-medal potential.

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July 2004

  • U-M merges two geriatrics programs (07/29/04)
    In an effort to strengthen aging initiatives on campus, the University of Michigan has merged its Institute of Gerontology with the Medical School’s Geriatrics Center. The combination will integrate U-M’s internationally recognized clinical, educational and research programs, which are expanding knowledge of the aging process and addressing the health care concerns of older adults.

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  • Drug to fight virus in transplant patients moves forward in trials (07/27/04)
    Mich.—A drug once considered for cancer chemotherapy is advancing in clinical trials to test its effectiveness in fighting a virus from the herpes family that threatens transplant patients.

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  • Alzheimer's vaccine slows memory decline, study finds (07/22/04)
    A vaccine intended to trigger an immune response in the brain appears to slow the progression of memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease, a UMHS neurologist reports. This link will take you off the UMHS Web site to the press release issued by Elan Corp., the pharmaceutical company that sponsored the trial.

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  • Bladder-sparing treatment shows promise against cancer (07/20/04)
    A new pilot study by University of Michigan Health System researchers found combining radiation therapy and a chemotherapy drug that is used successfully with other forms of cancer may effectively treat bladder cancer without toxic reactions, while allowing many patients to preserve their bladder.

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  • Female, black legislators tops for children’s health (07/20/04)
    When it comes to new proposals to protect children’s health at the state level, women and African Americans serving in legislatures are far more likely than others to put forth new bills — but the issue doesn’t appear to rank high on legislatures’ overall priority list, a new U-M study finds.

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  • Movies can raise or lower hormone levels (07/20/04)
    A romantic movie or an action-adventure film can send your hormone levels in measurably different directions, according to new research.

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  • UMHS shines on national quality report (07/20/04)
    The U-M Health System’s ongoing efforts to provide the highest quality in patient care received high marks in a new report released by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO).

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  • U-M hospitals report healthy fiscal results (07/15/04)
    For the ninth year in a row, the U-M Hospitals and Health Centers have finished the fiscal year in the black, with a positive operating margin that will fuel continued growth and allow U-M to serve even more patients from Michigan and beyond with high-quality medical care.

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  • MVN offers meningitis shots for college students (07/15/04)
    The U-M Health System's Michigan Visiting Nurses is teaming up with local Kroger stores this summer to vaccinate college-bound students against meningitis. MVN encourages all students living in dormitories and residences halls to get vaccinated against this potentially fatal illness.

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  • New chief financial officer for U-M hospitals (07/15/04)
    Doug Strong, who has helped steer the U-M Hospitals and Health Centers to continued financial good health in a challenging health care environment as interim Chief Financial Officer, will assume that position fully while also continuing to serve as associate vice president for finance and strategy of the U-M Health System.

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  • Will the insured help the uninsured? Study says yes (07/13/04)
    A new U-M study suggests that people with health insurance may be willing to sacrifice something in order to help the uninsured, both because it's the right thing to do and because it would provide a safety net if they or their loved ones ever lost their insurance. The new results come from a unique study that used a board game to help people understand the tradeoffs and benefits that might be involved.

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  • Genital pain disorder linked to overall pain sensitivity (07/12/04)
    Women with a condition called vulvodynia process pain differently, and these women are more sensitive to pain at other points in their body, researchers at the University of Michigan Health System found.

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  • Screening potential hires for carpal tunnel not cost effective (07/06/04)
    Employers who try to save money by screening out new hires who are most likely to develop carpal tunnel syndrome ultimately end up spending more, a University of Michigan researcher says.

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  • Pediatricians abound, but not in poor states (07/02/04)
    America’s children have many more pediatricians available to treat them today than they did 25 years ago, a new U-M study finds, but the doctors aren’t always where the children are. The wealthier the state, the more pediatricians there are for that state’s children – and the reverse is true for kids in poorer state.

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  • UMHS again makes U.S. News "best hospitals" list (07/02/04)
    The University of Michigan Health System is again the only hospital in Michigan to make the honor roll of the nation’s 14 "Best Hospitals," according to the annual U.S. News & World Report magazine rankings released today.

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  • A prescription for danger: Teens using medicines to get high (07/01/04)
    video  The medicine cabinet may seem like a strange place to look for a way to get high. But a growing number of teenagers are doing just that, raiding their parents’ pill bottles or buying prescription drugs illegally through Internet pharmacies and dealers. From potent painkillers to humble cough syrups, the same medicines that can help patients can also be misused to produce a high feeling. And they can hurt teens or hook them into addiction just as easily as other illicit drugs.

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  • Summer heat may endanger older people (07/01/04)
    video  Last year, the world was shocked and saddened when thousands of elderly men and women in France died as a result of a heat wave in that country. Here at home, the 1995 Chicago heat wave led to more than 700 deaths in that steamy city. Heat-related illness can be a very serious problem, especially among older men and women. Health concerns – or just the normal physiological changes of aging – may make it difficult for older people to handle high temperatures.

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  • Weight loss answers: How did we get so fat? (07/01/04)
    video  We’re less active. We eat super-sized portions of greasy, processed food. And as a society we’re getting older. Combine these factors and you get a population in which nearly a quarter of the country is obese. It’s a $100 billion burden that appears to be getting worse.

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  • Weight loss answers: How diets work in the body (07/01/04)
    video  Low fat or low carbs? South Beach or Atkins? Weight Watchers or Jenny Craig? Maybe you’ve tried them all. It’s even likely they all worked at first, until suddenly you seemed to hit a wall. With the increasing prevalence of obesity in the United States, what’s a desperate dieter to do?

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June 2004

  • Hospital computer system will make care even better, safer (06/28/04)
    Continuing its efforts to find new ways to improve patient care and prevent medical errors, UMHS has embarked on a massive clinical computing project that will allow its doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other health professionals to work together as never before.

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  • U-M mice eat all they want, but have half the body fat (06/28/04)
    Genetically engineered mice, created at the University of Michigan Medical School, are living every dieter’s dream. They eat unlimited amounts of high-fat mouse chow, but have about 50 percent less body fat than normal mice on a low-fat diet. And they show no signs of diabetes or other metabolic disorders.

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  • Cutting back on Rx drugs cost harms health (06/25/04)
    U-M and VA researchers have found the first solid evidence that people who cut back on their prescription drugs because of cost go on to have worse health problems later than those who don't cut back. The study, which followed 8,000 senior citizens for more than three years, found that heart problems and overall health suffered the most.

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  • Hospital standards for high-risk surgeries save lives (06/24/04)
    If all hospitals met the quality standards for five high-risk surgeries set by a national coalition, it would save nearly 8,000 lives each year, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • Most powerful laser to date produced at U-M (06/24/04)
    University of Michigan researchers recently produced what is believed to be the highest-intensity laser pulse ever obtained. The U-M-built laser, called High Energy Repetitive CUos Laser System (HERCULES), is so compact and intense that it could revolutionize the way cancer is treated, researchers say.

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  • Cabela's BBQ event helps U-M Transplant Center (06/22/04)
    Some of the world's best barbecue chefs will cook up a storm July 8-11 at the Michigan location of Cabela's, the world's foremost outfitter. And it will all raise money for one of the world's best organ transplant programs - - the U-M Transplant Center. All are welcome for four days of family fun!

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  • Half of head and neck cancer patients disabled by treatment (06/22/04)
    More than half of people treated for head and neck cancer were unable to return to work after treatment, according to a new study.

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  • Stat3 controls inflammation, reduces tissue damage (06/22/04)
    Medical School scientists have discovered that Stat3, an anti-inflammatory protein, appears to regulate the inflammatory response in laboratory rats with severe lung injuries.

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  • Congenital Heart Center hosts event for kids on June 26 (06/17/04)
    On June 26, the U-M Congenital Heart Center will bring children with complex congenital heart disease from around the country together for the day-long celebration "As the Beat Goes On."

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  • Pulsed dye laser therapy does not improve acne (06/16/04)
    A new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Health System has found pulsed dye laser therapy, a treatment currently being used by dermatologists to treat acne, was not effective.

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  • Early intervention lessens impact of autism (06/14/04)
    Contrary to popular fears that half of autistic children will never speak, new findings by the University of Michigan show just 14 percent of autistic children are unable to talk by age 9 and 40 percent can speak fluently.

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  • Genetic risk factor for colon cancer identified (06/11/04)
    An international research team studying Israeli colon cancer patients has identified a new virulent genetic risk factor that can lead to early screening methods to save the lives of people who have this genetic disposition for colon cancer.

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  • Employers can save by helping employees get more active (06/10/04)
    Employers can save on health care costs by encouraging very overweight and obese sedentary employees to become more physically active, according to a new study by the University of Michigan Health Management Research Center.

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  • Researchers to study spread of prostate cancer to bones (06/10/04)
    A team of researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and the School of Dentistry has received a $7.4 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study why prostate cancer spreads to bones. Although more than 80 percent of men with advanced prostate cancer develop this painful bone metastasis, little research has been done on why cancer invades the bones or how to prevent it.

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  • Women lag men in heart aspirin use (06/10/04)
    A new UMHS study finds that women aren't as likely as men to take aspirin regularly as a preventive heart-protecting measure, but that they're more likely than men to change their diet and exercise habits to help their hearts.

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  • Heart risk model eases worry (06/08/04)
    An international study of more than 20,000 heart attack and angina patients has yielded a useful tool for doctors: An easy way to predict which patients have the highest chance of dying within 6 months of leaving the hospital - - and therefore who needs aggressive treatment, and who needs reassurance.

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  • Obesity in developing countries compares to U.S. yo-yo dieting (06/08/04)
    The sad irony of obesity in developing, food-starved nations has not gone unnoticed by scientists.

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  • Patients not sticking to cholesterol drugs (06/08/04)
    New research shows that many patients aren't sticking to their prescriptions for cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins, and that the higher their insurance plan's prescription co-pay, the lower the chance that they'll keep up with their drug regimen. The finding was even true for patients who could get the most heart-protecting benefit from the drugs.

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  • U-M scientists find cancer's genetic core (06/08/04)
    Of the approximately 35,000 genes in the human genome, scientists at the University of Michigan’s Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that activity from just 67 is required to change normal human cells into cancer.

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  • High mastectomy rates due to breast cancer patients' choices, UMHS study finds (06/07/04)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Wayne State University found that women with breast cancer who said they made their own treatment decision were more likely to have a mastectomy than women who said their surgeon made the decision.

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  • Dementia often leads to nursing home admission (06/04/04)
    Although Americans have more options in caring for elderly loved ones today than in the past and the medical community has new ways of treating Alzheimer's disease, nursing home admissions remain steady.

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  • Imagery helps older people remember medical advice (06/04/04)
    A healthy dose of imagination helps older people remember to take medications and follow other medical advice, according to a new study in the June 2004 issue of Psychology and Aging.

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  • Librarians' pointers to find quality health information online (06/03/04)
    For some patients, talking to the doctor and reading pamphlets on medical issues is sufficient to learn about their health. Others aggressively search for third-party health information, sometimes to better understand or ask more informed questions of their health care providers, other times to prove their doctor right or wrong. For this group of informed health care consumers, searching the Internet is empowering.

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  • Air pollution is serious cardiovascular risk (06/02/04)
    A new American Heart Association health statement linking air pollution and heart disease risks was written by a panel led by a U-M Cardiovascular Center doctor.

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  • Brain blood scan helps many patients (06/02/04)
    An innovative brain scan that shows where blood is flowing - or not flowing - in the brain is helping many U-M patients with clogged arteries, strokes and brain tumors. Two new papers by a UMHS team show just how useful the technique, called perfusion CT, can be.

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  • Tree house takes special needs kids to new heights (06/02/04)
    This summer Trail's Edge campers will take the dreams of children with disabilities to new heights, as they become the first to climb into a tree house constructed especially for kids who use wheelchairs and ventilators. The first-of-its-kind tree house will be dedicated and officially open to Trail’s Edge and Fowler Center campers on June 6. The dedication will mark Trail’s Edge’s 15th anniversary, and also coincide with the first day of the week-long camp.

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  • Helping kids be ‘CHAMP’s with constraint therapy (06/01/04)
    video  A program offered at the University of Michigan Health System has children with brain injuries using weakened or underdeveloped upper extremities. The Comprehensive Hand-Arm Movement Program, or CHAMP, works through a combination of the children learning new techniques for using their arm and actual changes that occur in the brain.

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  • Kids and car safety (06/01/04)
    video  We depend on cars everyday to drive the kids to school, soccer practice, and friends' houses. But many people underestimate the dangers of motor vehicles. More than just modes of transportation, cars are potential weapons that kill thousands of people each year, but we can make efforts to keep children safer."

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  • New hope for children with abnormal heart rhythm (06/01/04)
    video  Arrhythmias can cause the heart to beat too fast or too slow. Treatment for arrhythmia is done in the cardiac catheterization laboratory and involves identifying where the short circuit occurs within the heart. Doctors then put a catheter in that circuit and turn on energy, either heating or cooling. This lets the heart’s normal conduction system work the way it’s supposed to, creating a normal heartbeat.

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  • Poison-proof your home to prevent accidents (06/01/04)
    video  Every 15 seconds a person in the United States is accidentally poisoned, and about 60 percent of those people are children younger than age six. To help prevent common household poisonings, a U-M expert offers some advice on keeping kids and adults safe.

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May 2004

  • Carr's Wash for Kids a big win for Mott (05/28/04)
    The Wolverine football program will team with C.S. Mott Children's Hospital on Saturday, June 12, for the U-M Football -- Carr's Wash for Kids sponsored by Michigan International Speedway (MIS) to benefit the campaign for a new C.S. Mott Children's Hospital at the University of Michigan.

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  • Microbes in GI tract affect how lungs react to allergens (05/26/04)
    Allergies making your life miserable? Tired of popping antihistamines like candy? Can’t go anywhere without your inhaler? The real problem may not be your stuffed-up head. It could be the microbes in your gut.

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  • U-M scientists use computer model to probe TB's secrets (05/26/04)
    University of Michigan microbiologists have created a virtual model of the human immune system to study what happens inside the lungs after people inhale Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB. The computer model is helping scientists learn more about this ancient pathogen, and why some people are able to fight off the infection, while others get sick.

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  • Born to Die Young? Study examines the risks of being male (05/25/04)
    In the years at the dangerous border between adolescence and adulthood, about three men die for every woman, according to a new University of Michigan study of the ratio of male to female mortality rates in 20 nations, including the United States.

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  • Obesity affects transition to work from welfare, study shows (05/25/04)
    Obesity contributes to various chronic medical problems, but new research on current and former welfare recipients indicates that obesity also affects women's employment success.

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  • Great Lakes swimmers: Beware of potentially deadly rip currents (05/21/04)
    Rip currents in the Great Lakes are a deadly but largely unknown phenomena, and the University of Michigan, through the Michigan Sea Grant College Program, has joined a national campaign to educate the public about the potentially fatal waters.

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  • Insurance shifts harm poor kids' care (05/20/04)
    Millions of low-income children experience a shift in their health insurance coverage each year, as their families enter and leave public and private insurance plans. A new U-M study shows for the first time that these transitions in coverage interfere with children's health care, leading to postponed appointments and prescriptions, and overall poor health.

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  • New center designed to meet demand for outpatient surgery, procedures (05/20/04)
    Today, the U-M Board of Regents approved the schematic design for the new 49,000-gross-square-foot East Ann Arbor Ambulatory Surgery and Medical Procedures Center. The new facility has been designed to meet surging demand at UMHS for outpatient services.

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  • Parents: Help kids cope with shocking news from Iraq, and watch for signs of distress, U-M expert advises (05/20/04)
    video  For almost three weeks, it’s been impossible to avoid the horrible images and stories coming out of Iraq. It’s been a struggle for adults to understand these events, as emotions of disbelief and shame mix with outrage and confusion. But what about children and teens? Depending on their age and how much they’ve seen or heard, the news and pictures may affect them too — in ways that parents might not predict.

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  • Pancreatic cancer research shows promise (05/19/04)
    A trio of new findings from pancreatic cancer research at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center reveal promise for a new blood test to detect early-stage cancer, a new way of telling pancreatic cancer from chronic inflammation, and a new basic understanding of how pancreatic tumor cells develop.

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  • Parents overestimate children's safety habits (05/19/04)
    Parents think their children use bicycle helmets and seatbelts more often than children say they use them, according to a new study by a University of Michigan Health System pediatric surgeon that matches parents and children's assessment of safety device usage.

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  • U-M researcher studies swimmer's itch incidence and risk factors (05/19/04)
    Lois Verbrugge takes her research personally. When Verbrugge, an avid swimmer, built a home with her husband on a northern Michigan lake, her scientist's curiosity was piqued by the irritation her skin developed every time she indulged her hobby.

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  • Health-conscious women not getting colons checked (05/17/04)
    Women who regularly get mammograms and Pap smears to check for early signs of breast and cervical cancer still aren't paying enough attention to their colons. New U-M research suggests that their mammogram appointments could be used as "teachable moments" to raise awareness about the life-saving potential of colonoscopies and other colon cancer tests.

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  • Hospital software enhances care (05/17/04)
    New research results show that software developed at UMHS can strengthen the "chain" of communication between health care providers who treat patients in the hospital and once they go home. The software, called the Discharge Navigator, will soon be used throughout U-M hospitals after a successful pilot test.

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  • Can You Afford This Prescription? - And Did Your Doctor Ask? (05/13/04)
    Do health care providers ask you whether you can afford the prescription? In a study published in the current issue of The American Journal of Medicine, researchers from the Department of Veterans Affairs/University of Michigan, the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center and Stanford University found that only about 25% of patients who were having difficulties with prescription costs were even asked if they were having trouble paying.

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  • Cooling the head prevents brain injury in newborns (05/11/04)
    An international study has shown that a head-cooling device can reduce brain damage in oxygen-deprived newborn babies. The University of Michigan Health System’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital was one of 28 institutions that participated.

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  • Quality of life affected long-term after prostate cancer (05/11/04)
    Four to eight years after men undergo treatment for prostate cancer, they continue to see changes – both positive and negative – in their quality of life because of that treatment, researchers at the University of Michigan Health System report.

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  • W.K. Kellogg Foundation gives $5 million to School of Public Health (05/11/04)
    The W.K. Kellogg Foundation has provided a $5 million grant to support a new U-M School of Public Health (SPH) undertaking, “The Crossroads of Public Health.” The Crossroads of Public Health represents both a physical space and an innovative approach to public health research and teaching, with a focus on working with the community.

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  • Living wills don't work, study says (05/10/04)
    Living wills don’t work -- and can’t work -- for their intended purpose of allowing people to say in advance how they’d want to be treated if they became too sick to choose for themselves, a new U-M study says. Instead, people should prepare durable powers of attorney to name a trusted person they'd want to make those decisions in case of serious illness.

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  • Medical School appoints Harry Mobley as new department chair (05/10/04)
    Harry L.T. Mobley, Ph.D., an internationally known scientist who studies how bacteria cause urinary tract infections and peptic ulcers, has been confirmed by the U-M Board of Regents as the Medical School’s new chair of microbiology and immunology.

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  • UMHS study links gonorrhea, prostate cancer (05/10/04)
    Men who have had gonorrhea are more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer, new research from the University of Michigan Health System finds. Having more than 25 lifetime sexual partners also increases odds of prostate cancer.

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  • Freezing technique successful for early-stage breast cancer (05/07/04)
    Imagine being treated for breast cancer right in your doctor’s office, with an incision as small as a pinprick to show for it. A new multicenter study found cryoablation, an outpatient procedure in which surgeons freeze the tumor, is effective at killing cancerous cells in small tumors.

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  • Missing signal causes misrouting in certain degenerative eye diseases (05/07/04)
    In the April issue of Genomics, University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center scientists provide significant details on the functioning of one gene—and the related proteins-- responsible for rare forms of macular degeneration.

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  • Rx pain drugs scarce in minority areas (05/07/04)
    Finding a pharmacy that carries certain prescription-strength pain medicines might be a big challenge for people living in predominantly non-white neighborhoods, according to a U-M team's new survey of Michigan pharmacies.

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  • Seminar addresses rising health care costs (05/07/04)
    To provide businesses with innovative solutions for handling rising health care costs the U-M Health System’s MWorks Occupational Health Division and MFit Health Promotion Division will host a breakfast briefing on Tuesday, June 8, entitled “New Models for Health Care Cost Containment”.

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  • Free PVD screening at U-M Hospital on May 22 (05/05/04)
    Pain in your legs can keep you from walking – but it can also be a sign of major problems affecting your body’s blood vessels. On Saturday, May 22, the U-M Health System will offer a free health screening for those concerned about their leg pain.

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  • Lack of iron affects children's brains (05/04/04)
    Teens who suffered iron deficiency as infants are likely to score lower on cognitive and motor tests, even if that iron deficiency was identified and treated in infancy, a new U-M study shows.

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  • Life Sciences Orchestra plays May 12 (05/04/04)
    The U-M Life Sciences Orchestra will salute the grand opening of the U-M Life Sciences Institute on Wed., May 12 with a free concert at 7:30 p.m. in Hill Auditorium, featuring works by Beethoven, Sibelius and Mussorgsky.

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  • People at risk of poor health care throughout U.S. (05/04/04)
    A RAND Corporation study that is the second installment of the largest and most comprehensive examination ever conducted of health care quality in the United States finds that people in all parts of the country are at risk for receiving poor health care.

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  • Prostate cancer guides downplay negative side effects (05/04/04)
    When a man is diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer, he must weigh the varied risks of four different treatment methods. But widely available patient education materials contain minimal information on the likelihood of side effects and a bias toward active treatment, according to a new study by the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • Year-round asthma for smokers' kids (05/04/04)
    Children with asthma whose parents smoke at home are twice as likely to have asthma symptoms all year long than children of non-smokers, a new U-M study shows.

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  • Chemical brain scan helps brain tumor patients (05/03/04)
    A new kind of brain scan that makes a 'chemical thumbprint' using a regular MRI machine may help brain tumor survivors get more accurate information about their cancer's status than conventional scans can.

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  • Dangerous clotting disorder can be caused by air travel (05/03/04)
    video  Sitting in that cramped airline seat for a long international flight could be more than just uncomfortable. Those conditions, combined with the lower oxygen levels and dehydration common to airline travel could cause a serious condition called deep vein thrombosis.

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  • Dental pulp cells may hold key to treatment of Parkinson's disease (05/03/04)
    Cells derived from the inside of a tooth might someday prove an effective way to treat the brains of people suffering from Parkinson's disease.

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  • Depressed seniors need more care, study finds (05/03/04)
    A new U-M study reveals that depression among senior citizens carries a huge unrecognized cost: many extra hours of unpaid help with everyday activities, delivered by the depressed seniors’ spouses, adult children and friends.

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  • Insulin pump benefits preschoolers with diabetes (05/03/04)
    Results of a pilot study from the University of Michigan Health System suggest the insulin pump is just as effective as insulin injections at controlling Type 1 diabetes in preschool-aged children -- and with less stress and worry for parents.

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  • Mighty vitamin D is heart smart (05/03/04)
    video  It’s time for vitamin D to get its day in the sun. Researchers at the University of Michigan Health System are finding this often ignored bone-building vitamin can play a significant role in the prevention of heart disease and the function of other critical body systems. And getting enough vitamin D in your system is as easy as soaking up the sun.

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  • Osteopenia warns of dangerous bone loss (05/03/04)
    video  What you don’t know can hurt you. That’s the case when it comes to bone loss, which can often occur with no symptoms or warning signs – until bending over to tie a shoe causes a bone in the spine to snap. But with appropriate testing, bone loss can be spotted and treated before it leads to a fracture.

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  • Some infants recognize, respond to social eating cues (05/03/04)
    While parents may describe their baby as a difficult eater or an overeater, a new study suggests it could be just a sign that the child is more tuned in to the eating habits of those around him.

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  • Unique clinic addresses special health needs of Down syndrome (05/03/04)
    video  New specialty Down syndrome clinic now open at the University of Michigan Health System. The clinic addresses the medical and rehabilitation needs of children and adults with Down syndrome, a condition that affects one in 800 live births.

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  • Working as a family improves kids' diabetes care (05/03/04)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan found a family-based self-management intervention aimed at low income adolescents with Type 1 diabetes led to better health and functioning in the short term.

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April 2004

  • Can you hear me now? "Belly talk" popular in U.S. (04/29/04)
    Some parents-to-be talk to their unborn child, read stories out loud and play classical music to bond and give the baby a head start on life. This uniquely American pregnancy practice, "belly talk," is the subject of study by a University of Michigan anthropologist.

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  • Family safety expo at U-M May 5 (04/29/04)
    As the weather warms up, safety experts from around Washtenaw County will offer families tips on staying safe outdoors - and indoors - this Wednesday from 3 to 7 p.m. at the U-M Health System's East Ann Arbor Health Center. The free event is open to all, and training credit is available for those who work with kids professionally.

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  • MVN hosts bone mass screenings (04/27/04)
    To educate community members about the importance of bone quality and osteoporosis prevention, the University of Michigan Health System’s Michigan Visiting Nurses is partnering with Kroger to offer bone mass screenings at local Kroger stores in May.

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  • College students: don't leave home without a meningitis shot (04/27/04)
    In an effort to protect college-bound students against meningitis, the University of Michigan Health System’s Michigan Visiting Nurses will offer meningitis vaccination clinics by appointment for students at its Ann Arbor office.

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  • Prechter Fund becomes part of U-M (04/27/04)
    Joining forces to fight one of the least understood and most devastating mental illnesses, the U-M Health System today announced that the Heinz C. Prechter Fund for Manic Depression will transfer its assets to become the Heinz C. Prechter Bipolar Research Fund within the Health System.

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  • Women need not lose sleep over menopause, U-M study says (04/27/04)
    Middle-aged women often complain that they sleep poorly, and both women and their health care providers point to menopause as the cause. But University of Michigan researchers Jane Lukacs and Nancy Reame say it may be time to put that assumption to rest.

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  • New 3 Tesla MRI scanners take imaging to the next level (04/22/04)
    Two new powerful Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or MRI, systems will take imaging at the University of Michigan Health System to the next level by expanding capabilities to image diseases in patients. Today, the U-M Regents approved the renovation project for the second 3 T MRI, which will be designated for research.

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  • Tommy Thompson honors U-M for organ donation efforts (04/22/04)
    Today, the University of Michigan Health System Transplant Center will be recognized by United States Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy G. Thompson as one of the top transplant hospitals in the country, and the best in Michigan, for its significant effort to increase the organ donation rate.

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  • U-M symposium weighs future of telemedicine (04/22/04)
    For the second time in three years, the U-M Health System and the World Health Organization are sponsoring a telemedicine symposium in Ann Arbor.

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  • Depression Center receives $10M gift (04/19/04)
    The U-M Depression Center has received a $10 million gift to support the construction of the nation’s first building devoted primarily to research, clinical care, education, and community and public policy programs for depression. Pending approval by the U-M Board of Regents, it will be called the Rachel Upjohn Building.

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  • U-M study: Botox injections provide long-term relief and better quality of life for voice disorder patients (04/19/04)
    Best known for smoothing wrinkles, Botox shots can also help people with a severe voice problem called spasmodic dysphonia. A new U-M research study shows that the shots, delivered to the muscles in the vocal cords, provide lasting and reproducible relief.

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  • Voice your concerns about your voice! (04/15/04)
    A U-M voice expert urges everyone to pay attention to their own voices - because changes in how you sound may be caused by a variety of health problems. April 16 is World Voice Day, when voice experts everywhere try to draw attention to the importance of a healthy voice.

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  • Do sleeply toddlers turn into drinking, smoking teens? (04/14/04)
    A long-term U-M study has found a significant connection between sleep problems in children’s toddler years and the chance that they’ll use alcohol, cigarettes and drugs early in their teen years. Young teens whose preschool sleep habits were poor were more than twice as likely to use drugs, tobacco or alcohol.

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  • U-M children’s doctors to encourage reading (04/14/04)
    Young patients visiting four U-M clinics will soon be receiving new books at each visit, thanks to a new Reach Out and Read program (ROR), being launched through University of Michigan Department of Pediatrics. The kick-off event will be Tuesday, April 27, and Perri Klass, MD, the national medical director and president will be speaking.

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  • U-M adult figure skaters go for the gold (04/13/04)
    U-M pair goes for the gold at the U.S. Adult National Figure Skating Championships in Lake Placid, New York at April 15th in pairs event.

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  • Major increase in eye disease forecast (04/12/04)
    Eye disease will affect many more Americans — and many more Michiganders — as the population increases in age in the coming years, according to a study released by the National Eye Institute (NEI) and echoed by experts at the U-M's Kellogg Eye Center.

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  • World's Oldest Mouse Celebrates Fourth Birthday (04/12/04)
    Yoda, the world’s oldest mouse, celebrated his fourth birthday at U-M on Saturday, April 10, 2004. A dwarf mouse, Yoda lives in quiet seclusion with his cage mate, Princess Leia, in a pathogen-free rest home for geriatric mice.

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  • May 1 event combines soccer and education to “kick” tobacco use in kids (04/09/04)
    On Saturday, May 1 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Wide World Sports Center in Ann Arbor, the University of Michigan Health System Tobacco Consultation Service and the UMHS Community Health Service will welcome youngsters in grades one through eight to participate in “Kickin’ It”-an event to promote awareness about tobacco dangers.

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  • U-M Health System launches anti-scald campaign (04/08/04)
    To prevent scald burn injuries, the University of Michigan Trauma Burn Center is launching a scald injury prevention campaign to educate plumbing and building trade professionals, landlords and homeowners about how they can take action to stop these unnecessary and preventable burn injuries.

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  • Program helps prevent delirium in older hospital patients (04/07/04)
    The Elder Life Program, a delirium prevention project at UMHS, uses volunteers to provide stimulating activities, early mobilization, nutrition support and relaxation interventions for frail elderly patients at risk for developing delirium in their hospital stay. The program's staff and volunteers were recently awarded the UMHS Volunteer Services Distinguished Service Award.

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  • U-M Medical School ranks No. 7 in U.S. (04/02/04)
    The University of Michigan Medical School now ranks No. 7 among the nation's 125 accredited medical schools, according to the annual "Best Graduate Schools" rankings released today by U.S. News & World Report .

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  • A heads up on bike safety (04/01/04)
    video  Biking is a fun way for kids to be active and get outside, but danger lurks beneath those tire spokes. Each year, bike-related crashes kill about 900 people and injure 567,000 others. Statistics show that 67,000 of these injuries are head injuries– and most of them, 80 percent to 85 percent, would have been less severe or prevented altogether if the rider had been wearing a helmet.

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  • Bringing HOPE to students (04/01/04)
    video  The Health Occupations Partners in Education Program, offered by the University of Michigan Medical School, helps minority high school students learn about careers in the health care field, providing tutoring, job shadowing and academic advice.

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  • Family exercise can be the key to healthier lifestyle for kids (04/01/04)
    video  In the last two decades the number of overweight and obese children has more than doubled, putting them at risk to become overweight or obese adults with serious problems such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and even psychological and social problems. Fortunately, parents can take steps now to prevent this.

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  • Get a jump on treating spring allergies (04/01/04)
    video  As April showers prepare to usher in May flowers, so too comes the tree, grass and weed pollens that trigger allergies in up to a quarter of the population. While seasonal allergies are on the rise, heading them off early by seeking treatment before the runny nose, congestion and watery eyes set in can help keep these uncomfortable symptoms at bay.

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  • Men with family history of prostate cancer predict higher risk (04/01/04)
    When a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer, his brothers are twice as likely to develop the disease as well, often at an earlier age. New research from the University of Michigan Health System finds these brothers are aware of their increased risk and many have taken vitamins or supplements to improve their health.

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  • U-M Pediatric Trauma Program receives Level 1 verification (04/01/04)
    The U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital has been reverified as a pediatric Level 1 trauma center by the Committee on Trauma of the American College of Surgeons in recognition of its dedication to providing optimal care for injured patients.

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March 2004

  • "Spring forward" sleep tips for kids (03/29/04)
    As the national prepares to "spring forward" and lose an hour of sleep, U-M sleep experts offer tips and information for parents to help their kids get more Zzzzzz's now and all year long. They're also getting ready to open their second sleep disorders diagnostic facility.

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  • Black men less likely to be treated for prostate cancer (03/29/04)
    Black men with the most aggressive form of prostate cancer are less likely than white men to receive surgery or radiation therapy, according to a new study by University of Michigan Health System researchers.

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  • Four U-M Health System sites honored with 2003 Governor's Award of Excellence (03/25/04)
    For the second year, four University of Michigan Health System sites received the prestigious 2003 Governor's Award of Excellence for Improving Preventive Care in the Ambulatory Care Setting. Due to these sites' success, more sites will be applying for the award in 2004.

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  • Smart drugs that deliver the right punch (03/23/04)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School's Center for Biologic Nanotechnology are developing "smart" drug delivery devices that will knock out cancer cells with lethal doses, leaving normal cells unharmed, and even reporting back on their success.

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  • Depression-in-the-workplace survey released (03/22/04)
    Though American companies believe they're effectively addressing depression among their employees, workers with depression still feel that acknowledging their condition openly could damage their careers, a new survey finds. The study, released today by the U-M Depression Center and the National Mental Health Association, shows that depression treatment and coverage in the workplace has a long way to go.

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  • Geriatric social workers receive lifetime achievement awards (03/18/04)
    Ruth Campbell, M.S.W., and David Neal, M.S.W., A.C.S.W., were recently honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the University of Michigan Health System’s Department of Social Work.

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  • Hockey event scores funds for heart transplant patients (03/16/04)
    On Saturday, April 3, the U-M Health System Section of Cardiac Surgery and Division of Cardiology will be trading in their scrubs and white coats for ice skates and hockey jerseys to play in the third annual Hearts on Ice Hockey Challenge. Proceeds from Hearts on Ice will help support cardiac surgery transplant patient who can not afford the cost of post-operative medications.

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  • U-M children's hearing program earns national award (03/16/04)
    The Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (AG Bell) has chosen to award its first ever Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Hospital Award to the University of Michigan Health System's childhood hearing program.

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  • St. Patrick's Day drinking tips (03/15/04)
    If you do plan to revel in the spirit of St. Patrick's day and then drive, don't count on the luck of the Irish to protect you and others against serious injury or even stricter criminal penalties with Michigan's new laws. To keep your celebration fun and safe, an MFit alcohol counselor offers tips and information everyone should know before hoisting a pint of green beer.

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  • UMHS response to Judge Cohn's ruling (03/12/04)
    The University of Michigan Health System attorneys had a discussion today in chambers with Judge Avery Cohn in U.S. District Court in Detroit regarding the brief and arguments related to the U.S. Justice Department sobpoena for UMHS medical records pertaining to abortion.

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  • Privacy law affects research (03/11/04)
    As the one-year anniversary of the nation's medical privacy law approaches, a new study shows the negative impact that its implementation may be having on certain kinds of health research. U-M researchers report this week that HIPAA compliance severely affected their ability to study heart attack patients after they left the hospital.

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  • 25% lower death risk for heart patients at quality hospitals (03/10/04)
    Heart attack patients have a 25 percent lower risk of dying within a year of leaving the hospital if their doctors and nurses follow standard national guidelines for their care, and teach them how to stick to those standards at home. This major effect on mortality rates, seen in 2,800 Medicare patients treated at 33 Michigan hospitals, is the first evidence that standardized heart care saves lives.

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  • Study shows "gaming" in heart transplant system (03/09/04)
    When an organ becomes available for transplant, patients who are sicker get top priority. But a new U-M/Penn State study finds evidence that heart transplant centers have sometimes exaggerated the severity of a patient’s condition to increase the likelihood of obtaining a transplant organ. It also shows that a recent policy change worked to stop this “gaming.”

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  • Study weighs cost-benefit for implanted defibrillators (03/09/04)
    In a vivid illustration of the tradeoffs that society increasingly faces in this age of costly new medical technology, new U-M research examines the potential impact of Medicare's decision to cover lifesaving implanted devices only for certain heart patients, and not for others.

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  • Why don't heart patients take their meds? (03/09/04)
    A new U-M study looks at one of the biggest conundrums in medicine: Why don't patients take the medications their doctors prescribe, even when the drugs could save their lives or prevent their conditions from worsening? The study, in heart attack patients, finds that forgetfulness, carelessness and side effects all play a role.

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  • Zeroing in on macular degeneration genes (03/04/04)
    Scientists from the U-M Kellogg Eye Center report that they've narrowed the search for genes that cause age-related macular degeneration to five small regions of DNA. By zeroing in on these areas, they hope to determine what causes the devastating vision loss disease that affects millions.

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  • Alternative medicine enters mainstream (03/03/04)
    On Friday, March 12, experts from the U-M and beyond will gather to discuss the ways in which alternative medicine techniques are edging into the mainstream medical community, from university research to HMO coverage to primary care. The event is free and open to the public.

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  • Gaps seen in kids' eye care (03/02/04)
    Four new U-M studies bring into focus the under-studied issue of children's eye care, and document major disparities in care based on race, gender, income, location and insurance status. The researchers find that school-based vision screening may be able to help address these gaps.

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  • A ticking time bomb: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (03/01/04)
    video  Nearly 15,000 Americans die each year from a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Until it ruptures, this bulge in the main blood vessel that runs from the heart rarely causes any symptoms for the unsuspecting patient. However, it is a ticking time bomb. Experts from UMHS recommend that men and women who are at risk for developing an abdominal aortic aneurysm talk with their health care professional about screening for this silent killer.

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  • Are teens dying for a tan? (03/01/04)
    video  As the long cold days of winter pale our complexion, thousands will turn to tanning booths to brighten their skin and their spirits. What people don’t realize is that the bronzed glow they so desire is only the skin’s visible response to damage from harmful ultraviolet rays. Dermatologists at the University of Michigan Health System say even one trip to the tanning booth can result in DNA damage that can cause skin cancer.

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  • Cleansing the blood of ‘bad’ cholesterol (03/01/04)
    video  For approximately one in 300,000 people exercise, a healthy diet and medications are not enough to reduce their cholesterol. They now have another option. Cholesterol apheresis is a blood-filtering technique similar to kidney dialysis that strips the blood of LDL cholesterol to help lower the levels of this artery-clogging substance. UMHS is one of a handful of centers across the country, and the only one in Michigan, to offer this technique.

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February 2004

  • M-CARE launches new health plan (02/27/04)
    M-CARE, the nonprofit health plan owned by the U-M, has added a preferred-provider organization product to it portfolio, which currently includes HMO and Point of Service plans. The new plan gives employers "one stop shopping" options through M-CARE.

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  • New drugs limit deadly effects of graft-versus-host disease (02/27/04)
    A new class of anti-cancer drugs, currently being tested in human clinical trials, reduces the severity of graft-versus-host disease or GVHD - a common and often deadly complication of life-saving bone marrow transplants - without suppressing the immune response required to kill lingering cancer cells.

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  • New procedure stops pediatric heart arrhythmia cold (02/25/04)
    The U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital is the only hospital in Michigan to offer a new minimally invasive tissue freezing technique called cryoablation for children with heart arrhythmias. The procedure effectively and safely stops arrhythmias cold by eliminating the cells responsible for the abnormal heart rhythm.

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  • Patient Safety at the U-M Health System (02/24/04)
    The U-M Health System is proud to have our patient safety efforts featured in stories appearing in the media across Michigan today, including the front page of the Detroit Free Press.

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  • Mott Rock’n Roll annual benefit celebrates American spirit (02/23/04)
    On March 26, get ready to put your patriotic pride on display and dance the night away at the annual University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital Rock’n Roll party.

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  • U-M leads Michigan hospitals in quality (02/23/04)
    A new health care quality report has awarded its highest ranking to the U-M Hospitals and Health Centers in all eight categories of treatment that were evaluated. U-M is the only hospital surveyed that earned the highest rating in every category.

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  • Brain scans show how placebo eases pain (02/20/04)
    Researchers from UMHS and the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System have produced the strongest evidence yet that a placebo — or the mere expectation of relief, with no real treatment -- causes physical changes in how the brain responds to pain.

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  • Conference examines local child poverty (02/19/04)
    A free conference on March 12, sponsored by the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and MedStart, will showcase efforts to combat child poverty in Washtenaw County.

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  • Doctor wins 2004 Ove Ferno Award for Clinical Research (02/19/04)
    Dr. Ovide Pomerleau is the recipient of the 2004 Ove Ferno Award for Clinical Research for innovative research on nicotine and tobacco. Given once every three years by the Society for Research on Nicotine Tobacco (SRNT), the award acknowledges ground-breaking conceptual and scientific contributions to the field of tobacco and nicotine research, and outstanding leadership in nicotine and tobacco research dissemination activities.

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  • Expanded reproduction, perinatal centers to improve patient service (02/19/04)
    The U-M Board of Regents approved the expansion of the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Program and the Perinatal Assessment Center at UMHS, which will make it possible for even more couples who are struggling to conceive or facing high-risk pregnancies to give birth to healthy babies.

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  • March 9-10 conference on college depression (02/19/04)
    As many as 15 percent of college-age young people may have depression. A conference on March 9 and 10 at the U-M will explore the many issues surrounding the detection and treatment of depressive disorders in young people, putting special focus on stress, sleep and alcohol.

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  • New Med School neurology chair starts March 1 (02/19/04)
    The University of Michigan Board of Regents today approved the appointment, effective March 1, 2004, of David Fink, M.D., as the first Robert Brear Professor of Neurology and new chair of the U-M Medical School's Department of Neurology.

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  • Surgery safer at teaching hospitals (02/18/04)
    Patients undergoing complex gastrointestinal surgery at teaching hospitals are less likely to die or experience complications than those patients at non-teaching hospitals, primarily because teaching hospitals tend to perform these surgeries more often.

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  • 4-drug combo saves heart patients' lives (02/16/04)
    A "cocktail" of four proven, inexpensive drugs can save heart attack patients' lives, a new U-M Cardiovascular Center study shows. Patients who got all four after having a heart attack or angina were 90 percent less likely to die within 6 months of hospitalization than patients who got none.

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  • Anthrax can germinate and grow in soil (02/16/04)
    For Bacillus anthracis, the bacterium that causes anthrax, nothing beats the inside of a warm human or animal host for triggering an intense spurt of rapid growth and reproductive activity. But when a warm-blooded animal isn't available, new research by scientists in the U-M Medical School shows that ordinary dirt can do the job, as well.

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  • HUPO scientists tackle human blood plasma proteome (02/16/04)
    U-M proteomics expert Gilbert S. Omenn, M.D., Ph.D. directs the Human Plasma Proteome Project organized by the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO). At this year's AAAS meeting, Omenn will discuss the project's challenges and successes, and explain how scientists are analyzing protein data from reference specimens.

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  • M-CAID quality recognized by state of Michigan (02/16/04)
    M-CARE, the not-for-profit health plan owned by the University of Michigan, announced that M-CAID, its Medicaid HMO, has been awarded a “Benchmark Award” from the state of Michigan for the second year in a row. The award is given to the top five Medicaid health plans in the state that demonstrate high-quality health care services in the areas of clinical and consumer satisfaction.

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  • Diabetes patients skip medications to save money (02/12/04)
    In a recent nationwide survey, University of Michigan Health System researchers found diabetes patients’ prescription drugs costs – which frequently mounted above $100 a month – created a financial burden that led to increasing credit card debt, borrowing money from family or friends and even cutting back on basic needs such as food or heat.

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  • UMHS to study burns related to children's clothing (02/11/04)
    The U-M Trauma Burn Center has joined the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and about 115 burn centers nationwide in an initiative aimed at collecting data about serious clothing-related burns to children under age 15.

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  • Study: Rectal cancer treatment gaps persist, especially for African Americans (02/09/04)
    Colorectal cancer may be getting a lot of attention in the public eye, but many rectal cancer patients still aren't getting the best care - - especially those who are African-American. A new U-M study adds to the long list of racial disparities already known to exist in colorectal cancer, and shows that many patients of any race still aren't receiving appropriate post-surgery radiation therapy.

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  • Sleep apnea disrupts sleep throughout night (02/03/04)
    Sleep researchers at the University of Michigan Health System and engineers at Altarum Institute in Ann Arbor, Mich., have discovered evidence that the disruption of sleep in sleep apnea may be much more frequent than the breathing pauses, or apneas, themselves.

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  • UMHS to host nursing career fair March 7 (02/03/04)
    The U-M Health System will host an on-site nursing career fair on Sunday, March 7, to attract more top-quality nurses as it prepares for continued growth. The career fair will be held from noon to 4 p.m. at the Towsley Center in the University Hospital, and any experienced nurses and nursing students are welcome to attend.

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  • Americans still too slow in responding to heart attack, U-M expert says, but simple tips can save lives (02/02/04)
    video  If you’re like most Americans, if you start feeling chest pains or short of breath, you might wait it out for an hour or two, just to see if the symptoms go away. But that’s just about the worst way to react to such symptoms, says a University of Michigan heart expert. They could be caused by a heart attack — and if so, every minute of delay may mean the difference between life and death, or between health and disability. Many treatments work wonders, but only if given soon after an attack.

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  • Low-carb mania: getting past the hype (02/02/04)
    video  In today’s low-carb craze, weight loss plans that once promoted low-fat, high-carbohydrate foods like potatoes and breads as the keys to a healthy diet have been pushed aside in favor of a menu of meats, eggs, and cheeses. But are carbohydrates really the culprit behind America’s troubling obesity epidemic? U-M registered dietitian weighs in with the truth about these low-carbohydrate diets and how to achieve healthy and lasting weight loss.

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  • Patching up low libido: Study examines testosterone in women (02/02/04)
    video  As women age, many begin to see a substantial drop in their sex drives. In some cases, it may be fatigue, emotional stress or lack of an available partner. But in some women, it’s the dramatic loss of their natural supply of the hormone testosterone, due to hysterectomy or certain medications. Now, researchers at the University of Michigan Health System are testing whether low doses of testosterone, given through a patch, can help correct low libido in women.

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January 2004

  • U-M ranks high for women's heart care (01/29/04)
    A new ranking from Good Housekeeping magazine puts the U-M Cardiovascular Center among the top centers in the nation for women's heart care, just as the U-M prepared to open a new clinic just for women with heart disease.

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  • Robot-assisted surgery for young heart patients (01/28/04)
    The first-ever direct comparison of robot-assisted and traditional surgery for children’s heart defects shows that the robot reduces patients’ recuperation time and surgery-related trauma and scarring, while extending the length of the operation by just over half an hour.

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  • Leg bypass patients aided by drugs (01/27/04)
    The same drugs that help millions of heart patients can also aid people who have painful blockages in the blood vessels of their legs, new research from the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center shows

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  • Epilepsy drug may delay Alzheimer’s progression (01/22/04)
    A medication that has been around for 40 years and is successfully used to treat epilepsy, migraines and bipolar disorder may provide new hope for the more than 4 million Americans with Alzheimer’s disease. The University of Michigan Health System is one of 30 institutions participating in a national study to determine if the medication valproate preserves functioning and delays the expected decline associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

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  • Keep your heart healthy: Find out your cholesterol level at local screening clinics (01/21/04)
    In February, the U-M Michigan Visiting Nurses will team up with Kroger to offer several public cholesterol screening clinics at various Kroger locations. Knowing your cholesterol level - and taking steps to lower it if it's high - can reduce your risk for cardiovascular disease.

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  • U-M Survival Flight helicopter now lifting off from new Livingston County base (01/19/04)
    To meet the needs of the growing patient community surrounding the Ann Arbor area even faster, Survival Flight, the U-M Health System's air medical transportation service, is opening a new base of operation in Livingston County this week.

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  • Heavy drinkers use narcotics for back pain, despite warnings (01/15/04)
    Despite warnings about interactions between alcohol and narcotic pain relievers, a new study suggests many people taking these drugs continue to drink, in some cases heavily.

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  • How well do heartburn sufferers follow Prilosec directions? (01/09/04)
    Contrary to concerns by some health professionals, a new study shows that heartburn sufferers do just fine at following the directions on the label of Prilosec OTC, the over-the-counter drug that contains the same active drug component as prescription Prilosec.

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  • U-M/county program joins mental & physical health (01/09/04)
    As the Washtenaw Community Health Organization marks its fourth anniversary of providing coordinated mental and physical health care to uninsured and Medicaid clients, its leaders see it as a model for the state and nation.

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  • Sen. Stabenow to visit U-M Health System on Jan. 9 (01/08/04)
    On Friday, Jan. 9, at 3 p.m., Senator Debbie Stabenow will visit the U-M Health System to speak to employees and hear from U-M mental health leaders.

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  • Study finds genital pain more common than believed (01/08/04)
    A little known condition could be causing pain to millions of women throughout the country. Researchers at the University of Michigan Health System have found vulvodynia, which causes chronic and potentially severe pain in the outer genitals, is more prevalent than previously thought.

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  • U-M eye center offers blade-free LASIK (01/08/04)
    Patients looking for the ultrafast laser, the newest technology in LASIK eye surgery, can now find it at the U-M Kellogg Eye Center. And the laser itself, now used nationwide, was originally developed at U-M.

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  • U-M nurse appointed to state board by Governor (01/08/04)
    U-M nurse Amy M. Perry, MSN, RN, BC, was recently appointed by Michigan Governor Jennifer M. Granholm to the Michigan Board of Nursing. Perry was among seven others in the state appointed to the board. She was specifically selected for her strong nursing leadership and her expertise in systems analysis.

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  • BRCA mutations or family history of breast cancer does not increase colorectal cancer risk, say U-M scientists (01/06/04)
    People with mutations in BRCA genes or a family history of breast cancer now have one less thing to worry about. Although their chances of developing breast or ovarian cancer are high, new research shows their colorectal cancer risk is about the same as that of the general population.

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  • U-M Michigan Visiting Nurses offers meningitis clinics for Hajj pilgrims, college students (01/06/04)
    To protect travelers who are making the Hajj this year and college students living in residence halls, the University of Michigan Health System's Michigan Visiting Nurses is offering vaccination clinics against bacterial meningitis on an appointment basis at its Ann Arbor office.

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  • U-M Life Sciences Orchestra kicks off fourth season Jan. 18 (01/04/04)
    The nation's only orchestra made up of people in medical and life sciences fields will give the first concert of its fourth season on Sunday, Jan. 18, with a free performance of works by Mozart, Dvorak and Glinka.

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  • Eating healthier in the New Year by cracking the food label code (01/01/04)
    video  Polyunsaturated, saturated, trans-fat, natural sugar, added sugar, low fat, light, no fat—it can all lead to confusion when we shop the aisles of our local grocery store. An expert provides some suggestions on how to shop healthier in the new year by simply knowing what to look for on food labels.

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  • Fighting obesity by conquering “The Hunger Within” (01/01/04)
    video  Dozens of weight-loss books dot the best-seller lists, and the airwaves are thick with advertisements for weight-loss solutions. But in spite of these purported ‘answers,’ the number of overweight Americans continues to grow. The reason for this ‘overeating frenzy,’ is our emotional attachment to food. Expert explores the mind-body connection to compulsive overeating.

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  • Handling stress before it handles you (01/01/04)
    video  With the pace of life reeling out of control, stress and the overwhelming sensation that comes with it is becoming a problem for almost everyone. Recent research proves that great amounts of stress affect both our physical and mental health. To help combat this problem counselors at the University of Michigan Health System offer tips on how to be more “stress-fit” in the new year.

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  • Newly approved therapy successfully targets cancer (01/01/04)
    video  Unlike traditional chemotherapy and radiation used to treat non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which both kill healthy cells along with the cancer cells, a new, innovative therapeutic regimen uses radiation targeting the cancerous cells. Patients receive a single treatment, instead of multiple rounds of treatment over several months, and there are very few side effects.

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