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2005 News Releases

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December 2005

  • New U-M center focuses on the science of obesity, weight gain and metabolism (12/28/05)
    At a time when many Americans are resolving to lose weight, the U-M Medical School is launching a new center that will explore the science behind obesity, metabolism and weight gain.

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  • Film festival part of Department of Psychiatry centennial celebration (12/22/05)
    The U-M Department of Psychiatry will host a winter film series at the Michigan Theater in Ann Arbor starting Saturday, Jan. 7, 2006. It features seven classic films with a psychiatric theme.

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  • Unprofessional behavior in medical school an early warning? (12/22/05)
    Physicians disciplined by state medical boards were three times more likely than their colleagues to have exhibited unprofessional behavior while in medical school.

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  • Teen drug use down but progress halts among youngest (12/19/05)
    The proportion of older teens who use illicit drugs continued to decline in 2005, according to the latest national survey in the Monitoring the Future series released today, the fourth consecutive year of decline among the nations 10th- and 12th-grade students.

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  • Teen smoking rates continue to decline (12/19/05)
    Teen smoking has been in steady decline from the recent peak levels reached in the mid-1990s, according to the University of Michigan's Monitoring the Future study released today.

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  • Gene variation affects tamoxifen's benefit for breast cancer (12/16/05)
    One of the most commonly prescribed drugs for breast cancer, tamoxifen, may not be as effective for women who inherit a common genetic variation, according to researchers at the University of Michigan and the Mayo Clinic.

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  • U-M program director takes organ donation to heart (12/16/05)
    Secretary of State Terri Lynn Land today honored Mark Gravel, R.N., director of donation initiatives for the University of Michigans Transplant Center, with a Shining Star award for his outstanding work in promoting organ and tissue donation.

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  • Fire Fighters bring holiday cheer to burn-injured kids at U-M (12/14/05)
    On Monday, Dec.19, fire fighters with the Dearborn Fire Fighters Burn Drive will visit the University of Michigan Trauma Burn Center to distribute holiday gifts to burn-injured children treated at U-M. The event is part of the U-M Trauma Burn Centers annual holiday party for patients

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  • Medical student flexes muscles (12/14/05)
    Jaffer Odeh, paralyzed in high school, has recovered much of his mobility. Today he is a superb athlete and a caring U-M doctor-in-training.

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  • Women's Health Program seminar series (12/14/05)
    As a way of presenting sound, credible medical information to the public, the Womens Health Program at the University of Michigan Health System is launching a health seminar series that will feature physicians, nurses and other medical experts who will lead health education discussions on a wide range of health topics.

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  • Initiative to improve breast cancer treatment (12/13/05)
    A new initiative led by the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center will expand a pilot program to improve the quality of care for the more than 7,000 Michigan women diagnosed with breast cancer each year.

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  • Research: Modeling cell's messengers (12/13/05)
    Humans have millions of cells to conduct the business of the body. By exchanging chemical signals, cells talk to each other to perform functions like regulating blood pressure, converting food into nutrition and sensing pain or danger.

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  • U-M Life Sciences Orchestra concert Jan. 15 (12/13/05)
    The University of Michigan Life Sciences Orchestra will pay tribute to the music of Scotland, and the opening of a new U-M scientific research building, with a free public concert on Sunday, Jan. 15.

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  • Noted U-M psychiatrist dies (12/12/05)
    Dr. Thomas Carli, a U-M psychiatrist who championed new ways to deliver mental health care and physical health care in a way that served patients better, has died at the age of 59.

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  • Old test gives new hope for back pain sufferers (12/12/05)
    Results from a new U-M Health System study show that EMG can accurately diagnosis spinal stenosis, reducing misdiagnosis of low back pain and other common neuromuscular conditions that can mimic symptoms, and even helping to avoid unnecessary back surgery.

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  • Bipolar disorder and the Miami airport incident (12/09/05)
    The tragic shooting of Rigoberto Alpizar at the Miami International Airport by U.S. Marshals who thought he had a bomb offers an opportunity to discuss bipolar disorder and the need for law enforcement officials to understand mental illness.

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  • Choosing the best kidney for transplantation (12/06/05)
    A U-M study appearing in JAMA found that the use of organs from expanded criteria donors is not only adding to the pool of kidneys available for transplantation, but also increasing the chances for survival for certain patients with end-stage renal disease, depending on their age, how long they would need to wait for a donor organ and the severity of their kidney disease.

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  • Giving the gift of life (12/05/05)
    video  As families gather to exchange gifts this holiday season, experts and patients with the University of Michigan Transplant Center say its the perfect time to talk about giving a gift that could give someone a second chance at life becoming an organ and tissue donor.

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  • Healthy baby is dream-come-true for woman with cancer (12/05/05)
    video  This holiday season, Carrie and Brad Lintner have a lot to celebrate - a new baby and Carries defeat of Hodgkins lymphoma. But none of it would have been possible without a unique robot-assisted surgery at the U-M Health System that preserved Carries fertility during her cancer treatment by relocating her ovaries behind her uterus during her radiation treatments.

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  • Medbuddies: A child's constant friend in the hospital (12/05/05)
    video  For most medical students, the first two years of training are largely composed of lectures, labs and endless book-study. But an innovative student-run program at the University of Michigan Medical School is helping first and second year medical students to see the human side of medicine by pairing them with pediatric patients.

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  • Parents: Get the lead out (12/05/05)
    video  Lead-based paint and gasoline have been banned for sale in the United States for more than 25 years, but peeling paint and even dust in older homes are today still placing American children at risk for lead poisoning. Thats why U-M experts say its so important for parents to find out if their child is at risk and get them tested.

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  • Holiday tip sheet for reporters (12/01/05)
    The UMHS Public Relations office provides a list of story ideas, including some that are holiday-themed and some that are evergreen stories, for reporters, editors and producers. We bring you stories of love, triumph over illness, holiday elves, a mouse whisperer, and more.

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November 2005

  • Heart patients: Women tougher than men? (11/29/05)
    Women with heart problems may be tougher about their disease than their male counterparts, a new U-M study suggests. And that difference may help explain why they're less likely to get aggressive care for the No. 1 killer of both women and men.

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  • Nearly 300 U-M physicians among the Best Doctors (11/29/05)
    Two hundred and ninety-four physicians from the University of Michigan Health System have been named to the Best Doctors in America list, putting them among the top 3 to 5 percent of doctors in their specialties nationwide.

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  • New treatment improves liver cancer survival (11/28/05)
    U-M researchers are reporting success with a new method of attacking liver cancer. Radiation is aimed precisely at the tumor not the entire liver and 400 times the normal amount of chemotherapy is fed directly to the liver. The combination delivers an intensive punch directly to the tumors while limiting exposure to normal tissue.

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  • U-M heart center named to Top 100 (11/28/05)
    The U-M Cardiovascular Center has been named one of the nation's 100 best places to receive heart and vascular care, based on measures of high-quality and high-value care. The rating, made by Solucient, Inc., recognizes the CVC's overall excellence.

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  • Don't be a turkey! Stay awake on Thanksgiving drives (11/22/05)
    Nearly 31 million Americans are expected to travel by car this Thanksgiving, but drowsiness may put them - and their passengers - at risk of an accident. U-M sleep experts offer tips to stay awake, and what to do if you feel sleepy.

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  • Pain research helps identify who responds to placebo effect (11/22/05)
    A new study by researchers at the University of Michigan Health System sheds some light on one group of people that seems to experience the placebo effect. The researchers found that people with one type of chronic pain who have greater swings in their pain fluctuations tend to be more likely to respond to placebos.

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  • Study confirms physical toll of stressful events (11/22/05)
    The death of a child. Divorce. An assault. Loss of a job. These and other highly stressful events can take a toll on physical health and mortality many years later, according to a University of Michigan study published in the current issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

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  • Exposure to high levels of noise increases blood pressure (11/18/05)
    A new study by University of Michigan researchers suggests working in loud places can raise blood pressure levels.

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  • New Center for Value-Based Insurance Design opens with symposium (11/16/05)
    Insuring Value: Innovative Health Benefit Design to Preserve Quality and Contain Cost," a symposium to inaugurate the University of Michigan Center for Value-Based Insurance Design.

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  • Better treatment needed for leg artery clogs (11/15/05)
    Despite the fact that clogged arteries in the legs usually mean clogged arteries near the heart, doctors often fail to give heart-protecting drugs to people with severe leg blood vessel blockages, a new U-M-led study finds.

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  • Fewer heart failure patients die when hospitals improve care (11/15/05)
    Heart failure patients are less likely to die after they go home from the hospital if the hospital has participated in an organized quality improvement program, compared with patients treated at hospitals where such efforts arent undertaken, a new U-M-led study finds. Theyre also less likely to need another hospital stay.

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  • Treating kids' heart rhythm problems - with less risk (11/15/05)
    A U-M team today is reporting high levels of success, and lowered risk and radiation dose, from a new approach to treating children with rapid heartbeats and other heart rhythm conditions. The findings come from the Michigan Congenital Heart Center, a leader in arrhythmia care for kids.

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  • National award goes to U-M heart specialist (11/14/05)
    Noted University of Michigan heart specialist Bertram Pitt, M.D., has received the prestigious Herrick Award from the American Heart Association, in recognition of "scientific achievements that have contributed profoundly to the advancement and practice of clinical cardiology."

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  • We Can! offer kids successful strategies (11/14/05)
    Project Healthy Schools, a community and University of Michigan Health System collaborative, today announces a new partnership with the National Institutes of Health's Ways to Enhance Childrens Activities and Nutrition program, a national, family-based educational initiative, to offer effective strategies to teach families how to eat healthfully, become active and stay at a healthy weight.

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  • Exercise can lower blood sugar as well as drugs (11/13/05)
    Exercising before eating can regulate blood sugar levels almost as well as two common glucose-lowering drugs, University of Michigan research shows.

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  • How to prevent another Vioxx-like situation (11/10/05)
    The arthritis drug Vioxx eased the pain of millions of patients - but it also greatly increased the risk of heart attack and stroke among some of them. And that extra risk only came to light after it was on the market. A new U-M and VA study shows how this kind of situation could be prevented.

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  • Health Walk for prevention of premature birth (11/09/05)
    In 2002, one in eight babies in the United States was born before 36 weeks gestation, making it the second leading cause of infant deaths during the first year of life and the leading cause of infant death among black infants. In light of these and other staggering statistics, the University of Michigan Health System and the March of Dimes will host the sixth annual Health Walk Tuesday, Nov. 15, to help raise awareness about premature birth and the health disparities between black infants and infants in other ethnic groups; and to raise funds to support research and care.

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  • U-M ActiveU! program promotes employee physical fitness (11/08/05)
    Members of the University community will be encouraged in February to join together to improve their level of physical activity as part of the Michigan Healthy Community Initiative (MHCI).

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  • Surprising findings on Alzheimer's research attitudes (11/07/05)
    How far will Americans go when it comes to allowing Alzheimer's disease patients to take part in research studies for which they can't consent? A new study shows surprising answers that may help guide policy on this issue.

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  • Fighting cancer from the inside out (11/04/05)
    video  At the University of Michigan Nanotechnology Institute, a nanotechnology equivalent of a Trojan Horse has been created to smuggle a powerful chemotherapy drug inside a cancer tumor cell, increasing the drugs cancer-killing ability. While it is still in the experimental stages, this technology holds great promise to revolutionize medicine.

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  • Its never too late to stop smoking (11/04/05)
    video  Many seniors are making the difficult decision to kick the habit, one that some have had since they were in their teens. They want to do it for their health and for the health of their loved ones, and many of them are finding success with the help of a support group at the U-M Health System designed specifically for senior smokers.

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  • The flu: Is a pandemic near? (11/04/05)
    video  About as many Americans die of influenza each year as are killed by breast cancer. But only with some unusual event -- the movement new flu strains or a shortage of vaccine does the public typically take notice. And this year, flu season holds a frightening new prospect the avian flu.

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  • U-M protocol brings hope to some with pancreatic cancer (11/04/05)
    video  Pancreatic cancer will strike about 32,100 Americans in 2005, and it will kill 31,800. Few are eligible for surgery, and traditional chemotherapy and radiation offer only small benefits, which is why most patient die within a year. Despite that dismal prognosis, a new treatment developed at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center is giving patients a glimmer of hope.

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October 2005

  • Imaging method shows early if cancer therapy works (10/31/05)
    A special type of MRI scan that measures the movement of water molecules through the brain can help doctors determine halfway through treatment whether it will successfully shrink the tumor or a patients cancer will continue to grow, a new study shows.

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  • Five U-M faculty elected as Fellows of AAAS (10/28/05)
    Five faculty members from the University of Michigan are among 376 newly elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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  • Fused genes trigger development of prostate cancer (10/27/05)
    Scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School have discovered a recurring pattern of scrambled chromosomes and abnormal gene activity that occurs only in prostate cancer.

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  • MFit honored with prevention award from Health and Human Services (10/25/05)
    The University of Michigan Health Systems MFit Employee Wellness Program is one of just 10 programs in the nation to receive the Innovation in Prevention Award from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. MFit was honored for its programs aimed at educating, motivating and empowering the UMHSs nearly 18,000 employees to make healthy lifestyle choices.

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  • U-M LSI Director Alan Saltiel elected to Institute of Medicine (10/25/05)
    Life Sciences Institute Director Alan R. Saltiel was elected to The Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences along with 63 other new members from around the world.

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  • Antibacterial soaps no better at cleaning your hands (10/24/05)
    Germophobic Americans have antibacterial soaps in their bathrooms and kitchens, they carry hand sanitizing gels and wipes when they're away from home, and their grocery stores have even gotten into the act, offering wipes for the cart handles.

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  • Change your clock, change your battery (10/24/05)
    The U-M Trauma Burn Center, in collaboration with the Ann Arbor Fire Department, is reminding everyone to change the batteries in their smoke detectors when they set their clocks back as part of daylight savings. To help, Trauma Burn and the Ann Arbor FD will be going door-to-door to hand out batteries on Monday, Oct. 31 to Ann Arbor residents.

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  • Abu Ghraib, Guantanamo: Lecture explores doctors' role (10/21/05)
    Should doctors in wartime prisons blow the whistle on abuse, after treating the wounds it has caused? Should mental health professionals refuse to let military officials use their records to devise new ways to interrogate detainees? These questions and more will be the focus of a free public lecture on Wednesday, Nov. 16 at the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • Renowned experts to speak at Nov. 7 womens health event (10/19/05)
    Some of the countrys most distinguished experts in the fields of womens health and medical journalism - including former FDA official Susan F. Wood, New York Times reporter Gina Kolata and Michigan Surgeon General Kimberlydawn Wisdom - will discuss the impact of journalism on womens health during an event at the University of Michigan Nov. 7.

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  • $2.5 million grant will use nanotechnology to fight cancer (10/18/05)
    The University of Michigan received a grant for $2.5 million over five years to develop a system using nanotechnology to diagnose and treat cancer. The National Cancer Institute award establishes U-M as one of 12 Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnerships.

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  • New genetic link to high blood pressure found (10/18/05)
    A new genetic discovery made by a University of Michigan team may help explain why some people develop high blood pressure and others dont - and why some peoples blood pressure increases as they age.

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  • Oct. 28 event to address long-term care (10/18/05)
    The complex issues surrounding care for an aging population will be the focus of a presentation and panel discussion, The Challenges of Long-Term Care: Creative Solutions, from noon to 2 p.m. Oct. 28 at the U-M Hospital Ford Amphitheater. The event is free and open to the public.

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  • UMHHC receives 2005 Performance Through People Award (10/18/05)
    The University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers is the first not-for-profit health care organization to receive the 2005 Performance Through People Award by the Forum for People Performance Management and Measurement at Northwestern University. The award honors organizations that successfully capitalize on human interactions among employees, customers and vendors that impact its long-term growth.

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  • Cancer immunotherapy's secret weapon (10/17/05)
    Bone marrow transplants from healthy donors have saved the lives of thousands of people with leukemia and other hematological cancers. This intense immune reaction between donor and host cells is the most powerful form of cancer immunotherapy known to medicine. Now, scientists at the U-M's Comprehensive Cancer Center have found a rare immune cell that is crucial to the transplant's cancer-killing effect - a discovery that could make the procedure safer, more effective and an option for more patients.

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  • Gap found between white, black women with chronic pain (10/17/05)
    Black women with chronic pain experience more psychological distress, physical impairments and post-traumatic stress disorder than white women with chronic pain, a finding that researchers say should help lead to a narrowing of the gap in the treatment of chronic pain between black and white women.

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  • M-CARE announces new vice president of medical affairs (10/17/05)
    M-CARE, the nonprofit health plan owned by the University of Michigan, has announced the appointment of Gerald Bishop, MD, as vice president of medical affairs and chief medical officer. Bishop will have overall responsibility for the medical affairs division, which includes all medical management activities, pharmacy services, quality initiatives, and disease management programs.

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  • New devices effective with IVF in mice (10/12/05)
    Technology that more closely mirrors the natural fertilization process is showing promise as a new method of in-vitro fertilization, researchers at the University of Michigan Health System have found.

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  • Does smoking cloud the brain? Study suggests yes (10/11/05)
    Smokers often say that smoking a cigarette helps them concentrate and feel more alert. But years of tobacco use may have the opposite effect, dimming the speed and accuracy of a persons thinking ability and bringing down their IQ, according to a new U-M-led study.

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  • 13th Annual Save A Heart Celebration (10/10/05)
    A fall feast of fine wine and gourmet food will help some of the nation's smallest heart patients when the Congenital Heart Center at University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital hosts the 13th annual Save A Heart Celebration of Wine & Food.

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  • Pain medications less available in minority areas (10/10/05)
    Chronic pain is a condition that affects one in five Americans without regard for their race or finances. But a new study finds that minorities and people with low incomes have less access than high-income white people to the medications that will help them endure their pain.

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  • U-M Trauma Burn Center helps spread the word about candle safety (10/05/05)
    During National Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 9 14, the U-M Trauma Burn Center will help spread the National Fire Protection Association's message about fire safety.

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  • NCQA rank M-CARE Medicaid HMO among the top 25 in the nation (10/04/05)
    M-CAID, M-CAREs Medicaid HMO, has been ranked among the top 25 Medicaid health plans in the country, according to the U.S. News & World Report/NCQA Americas Best Health Plans 2005. This list ranking Americas health plans appears in the October 10 issue of U.S. News & World Report.

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September 2005

  • Car seat options for kids with special medical needs (09/30/05)
    Safe Kids Washtenaw County reminds parents and caregivers that children with special health care needs are subject to the same hazards as any other child when they are a passenger in a vehicle, and may require special car seating options.

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  • $18.7-million for integrative biomedical informatics (09/29/05)
    The U-M Medical School has received an $18.7-million NIH grant to begin imposing order on the myriad sources of biologic data, rendering them more integrated and more readily comprehended. The five-year grant will fund a new National Center for Integrative Biomedical Informatics, with the goal of integrating genomic and molecular biology information into disease or biological models to facilitate the work of many NIH-supported scientists nationally.

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  • Learn the new way to calm crying babies and help them sleep longer (09/29/05)
    Learn the new way to calm crying babies and help them sleep longer Blurb: Harvey Karp, M.D., pediatrician and child development specialist will teach parents how to trigger the calming reflex in infants during a day-long, hands-on skill-building seminar. Karp, author of "The Happiest Baby on the Block," also will present scientific support for why the "missing fourth trimester" - not gas, immaturity or temperament - is the predominant cause of persistent crying in infancy.

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  • U-M steps up efforts in clinical research (09/29/05)
    Several new programs at the University of Michigan aim to encourage clinical research - getting good ideas out of the lab and finding out if they could benefit the general public. But it's getting harder to find willing human subjects for conducting these tests.

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  • For desperate heart patients too sick for surgery, U-M team offers life-saving technology (09/28/05)
    video  Dramatic rescues are made possible by a device called the TandemHeart pVAD, the first in a new generation of heart devices that can take over for the heart's pumping function but don't require surgery. U-M teams have helped more than a dozen patients already with the TandemHeart, and hope to help many more with this device and other, more experimental technologies now being tested.

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  • High-tech heart implants ready to help more Americans than ever, U-M expert says (09/28/05)
    video  Nine years ago this week, a team of University of Michigan doctors gave a dying heart patient a second chance at life by implanting a high-tech pump in his chest. The high-risk procedure was the first in Michigan performed using a new blood-pumping device called a HeartMate, which helped the patient live until he received a heart transplant five weeks later. Today, an improved version of that same life-saving technology, and similar devices, have helped more than 175 U-M patients and thousands of Americans with failing hearts.

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  • One-stop shopping: New University of Michigan web site connects the public to U-M studies that need volunteers (09/28/05)
    video  From cancer and heart disease to rare disorders, the University of Michigan is one of the worlds largest centers for studies of new medical treatments and ideas. The U-M Health System has launched a new web site that provides one-stop public access to studies taking place around the University.

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  • Quality effort saves heart patients' lives (09/28/05)
    The same philosophy used to make better cars and computer chips can also save the lives of heart attack patients, a new U-M-led study finds. In fact, 26 percent fewer patients died in the first year after their heart attack when hospitals used quality-improvement tactics to prevent crucial heart-care steps from "slipping through the cracks" - in much the same way a car company ensures that a car is made well before it leaves the factory.

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  • What drug is best for you? Ask your genes (09/28/05)
    video  When patients receive chemotherapy, 15 percent will have severe side effects while 85 percent will not - even though they're given the same relative dose. What determines this reaction? It's all in your genes and the way in which each individual's body processes the drugs.

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  • When breathing needs a tune-up, harmonica class hits all the right notes (09/28/05)
    video  Weekly harmonica instruction is one way that people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can focus on their breathing in a way that improves their respiratory function, says a pulmonary specialist at UMHS.

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  • New contract extends U-M/URREA Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (09/26/05)
    The Health Resources and Services Administration has awarded the University Renal Research and Education Association a new five-year contract to continue administering the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. URREA has worked closely with the U-M Health System for several years on the SRTR, and the new contract will place its work with UMHS at the forefront of policy analysis and clinical research for patients with end-stage organ failure.

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  • Walk to support PFUND; help U-M fight neurological disease (09/26/05)
    The University of Michigan's Program for Understanding Neurological Diseases will host its third annual 5K walk to raise funds and foster basic research into the causes of and possible treatments for neurological diseases.

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  • Women lag in stroke tests, study finds (09/26/05)
    Women who survive a stroke are less likely than men to get crucial tests of their heart and neck arteries that can help improve their treatment and reduce their risk of a second stroke, a new U-M study finds.

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  • Geriatrics Center gives annual DeVito Award (09/22/05)
    The University of Michigan Geriatrics Center has awarded Janis Yonker, M.S.A., with its annual Anthony V. DeVito II Memorial Award, which recognizes outstanding service, dedication and commitment to excellence in the field of geriatrics education in Michigan.

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  • U-M researchers, local students to participate in Brains Rule! (09/22/05)
    Kids evaluating neuroscientists? That will be the task of local sixth- grade students when they participate in the fifth annual Brains Rule! Expo., at the Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum. Brains Rule! brings students and scientists face-to-face to observe and learn about the brain and the human body.

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  • Candle lighting remembers those who have died from cancer (09/21/05)
    The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center will hold its eighth annual Candle Lighting for Hope and Remembrance on Saturday, Sept. 24. The ceremony is designed to celebrate the lives lost to cancer and bring hope to their families and loved ones.

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  • Cheney's surgery highlights overlooked issue (09/21/05)
    Vice President Dick Cheney will have surgery this weekend to repair a bulging blood vessel behind one of his knees. It may sound like a minor operation, but it brings to the nation's attention an often-overlooked and sometimes life-threatening issue: the link between blood vessel problems and heart disease.

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  • Researchers ID new blood test for prostate cancer (09/21/05)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a panel of 22 biomarkers that together provide a more accurate screening for prostate cancer than the current prostate specific antigen, or PSA, test.

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  • Strong named interim CEO for U-M hospitals (09/21/05)
    Doug Strong, M.B.A., has been named the interim chief executive officer of the University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, effective Oct. 1. A nationwide search is being launched to fill the position permanently.

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  • Comprehensive Diabetes Center launched (09/20/05)
    A new Comprehensive Diabetes Center will unite U-M Medical School diabetes researchers and clinicians, increase communication, encourage scientific cooperation within and beyond U-M - and accelerate progress against diabetes and its complications.

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  • Over the hill? Aging isn't the end for sex, relationships (09/20/05)
    Sex isn't the exclusive playground for the young, but a quality of life issue that continues well after age 50, a University of Michigan expert says in her new book.

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  • U-M nurses produce educational film on patient's 'good death' (09/20/05)
    "Evan Mayday's Good Death," a short educational film, chronicles how doctors, nurses, social workers, chaplains and other health care providers worked with Mayday and his wife, Cheryl, to be sure he was making a reasoned decision, and ultimately, to support his choice to remove his ventilator.

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  • U-M launches center for stem cell biology (09/19/05)
    President Mary Sue Coleman today announced a significant expansion of the University of Michigan's efforts in stem cell science with the creation of a new interdisciplinary center for stem cell research, to be based at the Life Sciences Institute.

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  • Custom motorcycle auctioned for U-M Urology fundraiser (09/16/05)
    Motorcycle collectors and enthusiasts will wait in line for years to rumble off on a custom-built chopper from legendary South Dakota bike-builders Independent Cycle Inc. Now, one lucky bidder can ride one home this September from a highly-anticipated charity auction to be held in Troy, Michigan.

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  • Depression Center offers free screening (09/15/05)
    Depression affects 18 million adults in the United States annually. To call attention to the prevalence of depression in our society; representatives from the University of Michigan Depression Center will provide a lecture/information session at the Ann Arbor Public Library.

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  • Rapid genetic testing for eye disease (09/15/05)
    Rapid genetic testing for eye disease is becoming a reality, thanks to a technology developed at the U-M Kellogg Eye Center. Scientists have created a first-of-its-kind test on a microchip array that will help physicians hone their diagnoses for patients with the blinding disease known as retinitis pigmentosa.

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  • Self-applied acupressure may reduce sleepiness (09/14/05)
    Students who were taught to self-administer acupressure treatments to stimulation points on their legs, feet, hands and heads were more alert and less fatigued during class, researchers at the U-M Health System have found.

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  • U-M team learns about the origin of fat cells (09/14/05)
    A University of Michigan research team has determined some of the crucial steps in how fat cells are formed. The findings may help in understanding chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes.

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  • $1 million gift to Kellogg Eye Center (09/13/05)
    Leonard Miller, a U-M alum who was successfully treated for double vision at the U-M Kellogg Eye Center, has given $1 million to help Kellogg jump-start its campaign to build a new clinical and research building.

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  • U-M hospitals chief retires (09/13/05)
    Larry Warren, M.A., director and chief executive officer of the University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, has announced his retirement after 29 years at the U-M. He leaves the UMHHC organization, a major part of the U-M Health System, financially solid in the midst of a tumultuous health care environment.

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  • M-CARE increases online services to members (09/12/05)
    M-CARE members can now use their computer to access personalized health plan information.

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  • Walk Out of the Darkness (09/12/05)
    Every 18 minutes in the United States, a life is lost to suicide. Anyone who has ever lost a loved one to suicide knows that effective help for depression can sometimes be hard to find. To raise awareness of the complex issues related to depression, its link to suicide and to fight the stigma attached to it, join the fourth annual Out of the Darkness walk, at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, at Pioneer High School in Ann Arbor, Mich.

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  • Rodney Pacifico, U-M gastroenterologist, dies (09/10/05)
    On Aug. 28, Rodney J. Pacifico, M.D., clinical lecturer in the U-M Division of Gastroenterology and U-M Medical School alumnus, died surrounded by family in his Ann Arbor home. He was 33 years old.

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  • U-M surgeon to ride in Tour of Hope (09/08/05)
    James Geiger, M.D., a pediatric cancer surgeon at UMHS, is one of 24 people selected from thousands of applicants to ride with Lance Armstrong in the Bristol Myers Squibb Tour of Hope, a nine-day bike ride across the country designed to raise awareness for cancer clinical research.

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  • M-CARE retains NCQA Excellent Accreditation for six consecutive years (09/07/05)
    M-CARE has earned an Excellent Accreditation from the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) for its Commercial and Medicaid HMOs, as it has every year since 2000.

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  • U-M names Schembechler professor in adrenal cancer (09/07/05)
    The University of Michigan Medical School will formally install Gary D. Hammer, M.D., Ph.D., as the first Millie Schembechler Professor of Adrenal Cancer. Millie Schembechler, the wife of former U-M football head coach Bo Schembechler, died in 1992 of adrenal cancer, a very rare cancer.

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  • U-M researcher will be part of White House Conference on Aging (09/07/05)
    A University of Michigan researcher whose work has demonstrated the power of spirituality to help people overcome severe life crises has been selected to participate in the first White House Conference on Aging since 1995.

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  • Wake up, Doc! Lack of sleep affects young M.D.'s (09/06/05)
    The long hours and overnight shifts that are a rite of passage for young doctors may leave them so sleep-deprived that they function as poorly as if they'd had a few cocktails, a new U-M and Brown University study finds.

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  • Prostate cancer uses Wnt proteins to grow bone tumors (09/01/05)
    Scientists at the University of Michigan's Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that prostate cancer manipulates an important group of signaling proteins called Wnts to establish itself in bone and form painful tumors.

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August 2005

  • World Renowned Physiologist Horace W. Davenport, Ph.D. dies (08/31/05)
    One of the world's preeminent gastric physiologists whose landmark studies led to the discovery of the stomach's barrier to injury has died. Horace W. Davenport, William Beaumont Professor Emeritus of Physiology at the University of Michigan died of complications of pneumonia on August 29, 2005 at his home in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He was 92.

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  • A fix for failing hearts: Surgery with new device invented at U-M gives heart failure patients hope (08/31/05)
    video  University of Michigan athletes really know how to handle footballs and basketballs. But can they turn a basketball into a football? Probably not - but U-M heart surgeons can. They're fixing sick, basketball-shaped hearts and restoring them to a more normal, football-like shape, using a new device invented at the U-M Cardiovascular Center. The result is new hope, and a new treatment option, for people with heart failure.

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  • A 'pox' on shingles: Vaccine proven effective for debilitating disease (08/31/05)
    video  Chicken pox is an annoying, itchy rash for children, but the virus that causes chicken pox can cause Shingles, a very serious health problem for older adults. A national study by the Department of Veterans Affairs found that a higher dose of the children's chicken pox vaccine can help to prevent shingles in adults. When shingles did occur, the vaccine reduced the chronic pain of the nerve disease often associated with the infection.

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  • Advanced imaging, vessel-sparing radiation techniques help in prostate cancer treatment (08/31/05)
    video  One of the dilemmas patients face after a prostate cancer diagnosis is choosing from several treatment options. Studies have not shown any of the options leads to greater survival rates. What it comes down to for most men is a choice between side effects.

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  • Families need help coping with loved one's cancer, too (08/31/05)
    When someone we love has a familiar disease like a cold, we generally know what to do. It's very hard for families to know what to do in the face of a complex, life-threatening disease. Families often feel powerless.

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  • Healthy school lunches increase kids' appetite for learning (08/31/05)
    video  What you pack in your child's lunchbox can determine his or her appetite for learning. Studies show kids who eat healthy lunches, with limited sugar, tend to learn better throughout the afternoon.

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  • Quest for Breath run/walk Sept. 25 (08/31/05)
    The first-annual Quest for Breath 5K Run/Walk will be held in Gallup Park in Ann Arbor on Sunday Sept. 25 and will benefit the University of Michigan Health System's research on idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Pre-registration ends Sept. 15.

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  • U-M nuclear medicine pioneer dies (08/30/05)
    William Beierwaltes, M.D., one of the first doctors to explore the use of radioactivity in medicine and set the stage for several of today's imaging and treatment techniques, died Aug. 14. He had spent most of his career at U-M, and was the head of one of the nation's first nuclear medicine services.

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  • Everyday heroes featured in ad campaign (08/29/05)
    New print, radio and television advertisements are kicking off a three-year marketing campaign to raise awareness of the high level of research, patient care and education that occur throughout the U-M Health System. "What is so unique and wonderful about the Michigan Difference campaign is that it tells the real stories of patients and families, and faculty and staff," says Robert Kelch, M.D., executive vice president for medical affairs.

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  • NIH grant funds hearing-loss research (08/29/05)
    At a time when longer life spans are leading to a rapid increase in the number of people with age-related hearing loss, a new $6.9 million federal grant will help U-M Health System researchers understand the causes of hearing loss as people age and possibly the ways of lessening or preventing the damage that leads to it.

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  • Mott unveils new maize and blue tie-dye wristbands (08/24/05)
    The U-M Athletic Department and U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital are banding together to sell the newest style of the "M GO BLUE for Mott" rubber wristbands in support of the U-M Health Systemýs campaign to build a new children's and women's hospital. The new maize and blue tie-dye bands will officially go on sale at U-M Football Fan Day, and will be available for sale at local stores and online.

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  • Elderly with disabilities benefit from multiple forms of caregiving (08/23/05)
    Family and friends who care for elderly people do not tend to bail out once publicly paid home care is established, a new study shows.

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  • Thinking the pain away? (08/23/05)
    Just thinking that a medicine can help ease your pain may cause your brain to release natural pain-reducing chemicals called endorphins, a new U-M study shows. It's the first time the "placebo effect" has been shown to involve a specific brain chemistry system.

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  • Asthma inhaler abuse associated with other drug use in teens (08/22/05)
    Young people who misuse asthma inhalers are seven times more likely to use illegal drugs and nearly three times more likely to use alcohol than their peers.

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  • Women choose aggressive breast cancer surgery (08/19/05)
    When women, not their surgeons, have control over the type of surgery they receive, they are more likely to choose a more aggressive surgery that removes the entire breast, even though survival rates are the same for surgery that removes only the tumor.

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  • McInnis named first Thomas B. and Nancy Upjohn Woodworth Professor (08/17/05)
    Melvin G. McInnis, M.D., director of psychiatry programs at the University of Michigan Depression Center, was installed June 26 as the first Thomas B. and Nancy Upjohn Woodworth Professor in Bipolar Disorder and Depression.

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  • Immune system attacks on hearing studied (08/16/05)
    Our immune system protects us from disease, destroying invading microbes with a swarm of attacking cells. But it can also go haywire for no apparent reason, ganging up on normal tissues in our body and wreaking havoc. New U-M research explores why this sometimes happens in the inner ear, destroying a person's ability to hear.

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  • Leptin-signaling protein maintains normal body weight (08/16/05)
    What do laboratory mice at the University of Michigan Medical School have in common with millions of overweight Americans? Like many of us, these mice just can't stop eating. U-M scientists blame the absence of a signaling molecule called SH2-B.

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  • More is better, at least in angioplasty (08/16/05)
    Before patients get their clogged heart arteries re-opened, they may want to ask their doctor just how many such procedures he or she has done, a new study from the U-M Cardiovascular Center finds. The answer may make a big difference in each patient's risk of suffering a major setback before leaving the hospital.

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  • Researcher to study infections in nursing homes (08/16/05)
    UMHS geriatrics researcher Lona Mody, M.D., has been named the first T. Franklin Williams Research Scholar award winner. The award will fund her study of infection control in nursing homes.

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  • U-M gets $6 million to develop new cancer drug (08/11/05)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have been awarded a $6 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to discover and develop new drugs that target cancer cells that do not respond to current treatments. The goal is to find drugs that can be used to treat many different types of cancer.

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  • Why don't some patients take their medicines? (08/08/05)
    Patients who trust their doctors are more likely to stick to their prescription medicines, even if they face high out-of-pocket costs, a new VA/U-M study finds. But patients who have lower levels of trust in their physicians, or who have depression-like symptoms, are much more likely to skip doses or refills when costs become a problem for them.

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  • Billy Bones BBQ to benefit U-M Transplant Center (08/03/05)
    The award-winning barbecue caterers of Billy Bones BBQ will be serving up barbecued ribs, smoked pork sandwiches and smoked bratwurst on Aug. 19, 20 and 21 at Ypsilanti's Heritage Festival to help raise money for the University of Michigan Transplant Center.

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  • Study: Women prefer female colonoscopists (08/01/05)
    A new study from the UMHS Division of Gastroenterology has identified another factor preventing or even delaying women from getting a colonoscopy: the colonoscopistýs gender. The study, published in the August issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, found that 43 percent of women preferred a female colonoscopist in a primary care setting - and most would be willing to wait and pay more for one.

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July 2005

  • Aug. 14 Lupus Walk to benefit UMHS (07/29/05)
    The fourth-annual Lupus Family & Friends Butterfly Walk will be Aug. 14 in Woodhaven. All funds raised by the walk will benefit the Amster Lupus Research Fund at the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • Doc, do I still need this catheter? (07/29/05)
    Millions of hospital patients could be spared the humiliation and infection risk that come with a urine-collecting catheter, a new UMHS study finds, if hospitals used a simple reminder system to prompt doctors to remove the devices after two days.

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  • Nursing receives two federal grants (07/29/05)
    Efforts to recruit and retain nurses at the University of Michigan Health System have received support from two major federal grants that will fund professional development, individualized career planning, and a program that involves more nurses in decision-making.

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  • Baby Boomers put the hurt on the health care system (07/28/05)
    video  The oldest of the Baby Boomer generation will turn 60 this fall, and unlike their predecessors, they aren't afraid to visit the doctor. In fact, their interest in staying healthy coupled with their sheer numbers are taxing the health care system more than any group in history.

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  • Carbon monoxide: Poison gas or anti-inflammatory drug? (07/28/05)
    Carbon monoxide, a poisonous gas that kills thousands of Americans every year, could turn out to be a life-saver for patients recovering from organ transplants, strokes or heart attacks, according to new research from the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center.

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  • Don't wait - vaccinate! (07/28/05)
    video  Polio, diphtheria, mumps, and German measles - all life-threatening diseases that have been virtually eradicated through the use of vaccines. Despite life-saving immunization programs, some children still are not getting vaccinated according to the recommended schedule, putting themselves and their communities at risk. Fortunately, there is a way for kids to catch-up on necessary vaccinations they may have missed.

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  • Enduring chronic pain: 'Nobody should have to suffer when treatments are available' (07/28/05)
    video  Far too many people suffer from chronic pain without receiving adequate treatment. Pain is a thief in the night; it steals people's livelihood. Pain is under-treated. If something is not done about the pain epidemic, it's going to significantly impact this society.

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  • Heads-Up on Traumatic Brain Injury (07/28/05)
    video  More than half a million people each year sustain a traumatic brain injury, or TBI. These brain injuries are caused when the brain, which floats in cerebral fluid, smashes against the hard wall of the skull following an impact. They are often caused by motor vehicle or sports traumas, but also can be caused by physical abuse or or, surprisingly, by mundane household or workplace accidents.

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  • Is your child overscheduled & overstressed? (07/28/05)
    video  From birth through high school, it seems that American kids today have a full calendar every day of the week. And for families with two or more children, and parents who work outside the home, it can get pretty hectic trying to get everyone to the right place at the right time. It's hectic for the parents. But what about the kids?

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  • Imperiale appointed to NSABB (07/25/05)
    Michael J. Imperiale, Ph.D., professor of microbiology and immunology at the U-M Medical School and chair of the U-M's Institutional Biosafety Committee, has been appointed to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity - the first committee of its kind in the U.S.- to advise federal officials on national bioterrorism issues in "dual-use" research.

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  • Patients learn more facts from videotape than from doctor (07/25/05)
    Researchers at the U-M Health System have found that showing patients an educational video about their condition teaches them the facts about their disease even better than when their doctor tells them about the condition. But the study also found that anxiety and stress are reduced much more among patients after they have visited with their doctors than after viewing the information on the educational video.

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  • Possible herpes virus Achilles' heel found (07/25/05)
    Despite the fact that 45 million Americans are infected with the herpes simplex virus, scientists don't fully understand how the virus infects us. Now, new U-M research has identified a crucial cell receptor for that process; a potential Achilles' heel that could lead to new treatments.

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  • UMHS appoints new pediatric surgeon-in-chief (07/25/05)
    Ronald B. Hirschl, M.D., has been appointed Head of the Section of Pediatric Surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School and Surgeon-in-Chief at the U-M C.S. Mott Childrenýs Hospital. His appointment was effective July 1.

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  • Neuroscientist wins Russel award (07/21/05)
    A neuroscientist who explores the biology of emotions, depression and addiction has been named the recipient of one of the highest faculty honors at the University of Michigan.

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  • New eye/diabetes building project approved (07/21/05)
    With today's approval by the U-M Board of Regents, the U-M Health System has set its sights on a new building project that will house expanded space for the Kellogg Eye Center's clinics and research laboratories, as well as the Brehm Center for Type 1 Diabetes.

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  • Regents approve U-M hospital budget (07/21/05)
    The University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers has finished another fiscal year in the black and has completed its fourth consecutive year of increasing its operating margin, a sign of the medical center's strong financial health as it continues to expand to meet patients' needs. The U-M Board of Regents has approved the budget for fiscal 2006, which includes a goal of more than $1.4 billion in revenues and an operating margin of 4 percent.

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  • Second Chance at Life event to benefit U-M Transplant Center (07/21/05)
    On Aug. 13, the University of Michigan Transplant Center will host the fifth annual Second Chance at Life Fun Walk/5K Run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hines Park in Westland.

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  • U-M to offer chemotherapy in Canton (07/21/05)
    To make cancer treatment more convenient for Detroit-area patients and to accommodate growing demand for cancer care, the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center will soon begin offering chemotherapy infusion in Canton.

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  • Should some medicines be free? Diabetes study says yes (07/19/05)
    Nothing in life is free, but a new U-M study suggests that some medicines should be, at least for older people who have diabetes. The Medicare system, and taxpayers, could save money in the long run if such patients received drugs called ACE inhibitors for free, the study finds.

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  • Graduate students, post-docs create art from microscope images (07/19/05)
    Members of the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology are displaying their artwork at the Ann Arbor Art Fair. The art is photos of human and animal cells, organs and tissues.

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  • Perlegen, Pritzker Neuropsychiatric Disorders Research Consortium to collaborate on bipolar disorder study (07/19/05)
    The University of Michigan, through its Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute, is a founding member of the Pritzker Neuropsychiatric Disorders Research Consortium. The Consortium, which currently involves faculty members from the U-M Medical School and U-M School of Public Health, issued the following news release on July 14 about a new venture to study the genetics of bipolar disorder.

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  • Band-Aid" for heart failure in mice with MD (07/18/05)
    A common chemical used in the manufacturing and pharmaceutical industries can repair damage to cardiac muscle cell membranes and prevent heart failure in mice with the genetic mutation that causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy, according to scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School.

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  • Compound from Chinese medicine shows promise in cancer (07/18/05)
    A compound derived from cottonseed could help improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy at treating head and neck cancer, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found.

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  • Scientists discover more about how cancer cells form and grow (07/18/05)
    University of Michigan researchers have figured out one more component in cancer cells' aggressive growth - and hope that knowledge can help kill the cells.

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  • Why do aneurysms form? White blood cells play a role (07/13/05)
    Each year, aneurysms in the body's largest blood vessel kill 20,000 Americans, and are diagnosed in 200,000 others. But no one knows why they form. Now, new U-M research shows that white blood cells may play a big role.

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  • When caregiving is over, some have lasting grief (07/12/05)
    Low-income caregivers of elderly relatives are more likely than others to continue experiencing high levels of depression after their loved ones die, according to a new study by the University of Michigan.

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  • UMHS ranks among nation's best hospitals (07/08/05)
    The University of Michigan Health System has retained its position among the best hospitals in the nation and once again is the only hospital in Michigan to make the honor roll of "America's Best Hospitals" in the annual U.S. News & World Report rankings. UMHS was ranked 11th in the country, the same level it achieved last year. That puts UMHS on the magazine's honor roll of the 16 best hospitals, a list that includes the upper echelon of the 176 medical centers in this year's edition of "America's Best Hospitals."

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  • MVN offers meningitis vaccinations (07/07/05)
    In an effort to protect students against meningitis, the University of Michigan Health System's Michigan Visiting Nurses (MVN) is teaming up with Kroger to offer meningitis vaccination clinics for high school and college students in July.

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  • New drug system: peace of mind in a flash (07/05/05)
    The pharmacy team at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital has a new team member, one who is adding another level of safety to the mixing and dispensing of high-risk drugs for young patients. But it’s not a person. And it started its career not in a pharmacy, but in bomb detection.

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  • U-M study: The rich die differently from you and me (07/05/05)
    The inequalities that mark American life maintain their hold through age and even death, a new U-M study shows. Wealthier elders are significantly less likely than poorer ones to suffer pain at the end of their lives, the authors report in the August issue of the Journal of Palliative Care.

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  • Snoring now, hyperactive later? (07/01/05)
    Children who snore now may have a much higher chance of developing attention and hyperactivity behavior problems later, according to new long-term research conducted by U-M sleep experts.

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June 2005

  • $10M grant for Alzheimer's disease research (06/30/05)
    video  Alzheimer's disease research at the University of Michigan is getting a $10 million boost: a major grant that will fund a broad array of efforts aimed at finding and fighting the causes of the disease and other memory conditions.

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  • Geriatrics Center receives grant to train medical students (06/30/05)
    The National Institute on Aging has awarded a five-year, $662,450 grant to the University of Michigan Geriatrics Center that will enable one of the country's outstanding geriatrics research programs to provide medical students with exposure to and participation in aging-related research.

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  • U-M patient safety champion honored (06/30/05)
    He has vowed to make the U-M the safest medical center in the nation, and is leading a team that's making that happen. Now, he's being saluted for this effort by his peers from across the state of Michigan.

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  • U-M scientists find markers to identify blood-forming stem cells (06/30/05)
    Scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School have discovered the biological equivalent of a grocery store bar code on the surface of primitive, blood-forming stem cells in mice. Called hematopoietic stem cells, they give rise to all the different types of specialized cells found in blood.

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  • Burning or tingling feet may be early warning of pre-diabetes (06/28/05)
    video  Researchers are investigating neuropathy, or nerve damage characterized by a persistent tingling, burning or numbness in the hands and feet, as an early warning sign of pre-diabetes. Their preliminary research also suggests that lifestyle modifications, including weight loss and regular exercise, may be able to prevent further nerve damage among patients with pre-diabetes and - very possibly - reverse the damage.

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  • Can ginger control nausea during cancer treatments? (06/28/05)
    Ginger has been used for thousands of years to prevent or treat nausea. Now researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center are leading a national trial to determine if this plant can help people with cancer avoid nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy.

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  • Circulatory system on a chip lets scientists mimic heartbeat (06/28/05)
    A tiny chip that mimics a circulatory system - right down to the rhythm of a human heart beat- could be an invaluable tool in understanding the causes of cardiovascular disease and developing drug therapies.

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  • Erectile dysfunction common among men with heart disease (06/28/05)
    video  The most common cause of heart disease, a hardening of the arteries known as atherosclerosis, often causes erectile dysfunction in men. Erectile dysfunction can be a sign that someone has heart disease and can be a predictor of the leading cause of death in the United States.

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  • Minimize injuries on the way to retirement (06/28/05)
    video  The American workforce is aging. It is estimated that in 25 years the number of people in the United States who are 55 years and older will rise from one out of every 10 Americans to one out of every three Americans. This means more experienced workers in the field, but it can also mean more workplace injuries related to our bodies' natural aging process. By being aware of the physical changes of aging and workplace risk factors, then taking steps to prevent injury, our valuable older workers can minimize injuries as they approach retirement.

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  • Potty training tactics (06/28/05)
    video  Potty training is an important milestone in a child's life. Training can easily turn aggravating, though, when a child isn't as responsive as hoped. U-M doctors have valuable toilet-training tips to help parents with the process, including signs that indicate when your child is ready to begin training.

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  • The silent killer: Recognizing the early warning signs of bladder cancer (06/28/05)
    video  There's no easy screening test, there's no splashy awareness month and there are few clues to its existence early on. But experts urge people to pay attention to the signs of bladder cancer, which will develop in some 63,000 Americans this year.

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  • U-M one of 43 institutions to receive groundbreaking research funding from Gates Foundation (06/28/05)
    The Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences (M-NIMBS) at the University is one of 43 institutions - and one of only two in the Midwest - to receive a Grand Challenges in Global Health Initiative grant funded largely by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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  • Women's health suffers under welfare reform, study says (06/28/05)
    Women who are current and former welfare recipients suffer a whole host of health problems - and getting a job doesn't always help matters."

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  • Minimally invasive surgery treats early lung cancers (06/23/05)
    A new surgical technique offered at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center is helping people with early stage lung cancer recover more quickly with less pain.

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  • Self-esteem strategies needed for people with mental illnesses (06/22/05)
    Rehabilitation programs to improve self-esteem among people with mental illnesses should be tailored to their psychiatric and cognitive characteristics, a new study by the University of Michigan and Washington University in St. Louis shows.

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  • New pathology chair for U-M Medical School (06/17/05)
    Jay L. Hess, M.D., Ph.D. - an expert on the genetic and molecular changes that lead to cancer - has been named the chair of pathology and the Carl V. Weller Professor of Pathology in the University of Michigan Medical School.

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  • U-M life scientists receive $5.1 million from economic development grants (06/17/05)
    Four research projects at the University of Michigan have received funding from the latest round of the Michigan Technology Tri-Corridor (MTTC) Fund competition. The Michigan projects include research on cancers, infertility, lung disease, and multiple sclerosis.

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  • UMHS master plan unveiled (06/16/05)
    Presented today to the University's Board of Regents, the master plan maps out the opportunity for UMHS to build new buildings totaling about 3 million square feet during the next decade or two in three Ann Arbor locations already owned by the University.

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  • Early treatment may prevent foot amputation (06/15/05)
    A small sore on a toe may not seem like a major medical threat. But for the millions of people who have diabetes and other conditions, it can be the first step on a road that leads to the amputation of a foot - or even a leg. Now, a new study from the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center may help more people save their limbs.

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  • Nanoparticles transport cancer-killing drug into tumor cells (06/15/05)
    University of Michigan scientists have created the nanotechnology equivalent of a Trojan horse to smuggle a powerful chemotherapeutic drug inside tumor cells - increasing the drug's cancer-killing activity and reducing its toxic side effects.

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  • Zingerman's, Transplant Center team for Art Fair event (06/12/05)
    Zingerman's Roadhouse and the U-M Transplant Center are teaming up for "Another Roadside Attraction" from 11 a.m. - 8 p.m., Friday, July 22 and Saturday, July 23 at the Westgate Plaza lot along Jackson Road. Enjoy Zingerman's Roadhouse food at a discounted price while supporting the U-M Transplant Center during the Art Fair.

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  • Hydrocortisone creams are used in safe amounts (06/09/05)
    One of the downsides of summer can be the itchy skin that goes hand-in-hand with this season of bug bites, sun-related rashes and poison ivy. But researchers have some good news related to a common cure for these conditions: People generally apply over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream in safe and appropriate amounts.

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  • Second Chance at Life Motorcycle Run (06/08/05)
    The Third Annual Second Chance at Life Motorcycle Run will take place from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., Saturday, June 25, at Motor City Harley Davidson in Farmington Hills, Mich. The event aims to raise organ donor awareness and funds for the U-M Transplant Center.

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  • Women overestimate breast cancer risk (06/07/05)
    When asked to estimate the lifetime risk of breast cancer, 89 percent of women overestimated their risk, with an average estimate of 46 percent -- more than three times the actual risk of 13 percent, according to a study by University of Michigan Health System researchers.

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  • Doctor "report cards" and angioplasties (06/06/05)
    No one likes to have a bad mark on a report card. But a new UMHS-led study suggests that heart doctors who are publicly "grade" on their angioplasty results may be shying away from performing the procedure on the high-risk patients who are most likely to drag down their averages.

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  • New advice to keep kids healthy at camp (06/06/05)
    In just a few short weeks, 10 million American children will start heading off to summer camp. But before they go, health experts from UMHS and the American Academy of Pediatrics are issuing strong new advice to both parents and camp directors, and recommending new precautions to protect campers' health.

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  • Re-learn the art of a good night’s sleep (06/02/05)
    video  While sleep may seem like a natural process, it is one that can easily be taken for granted. A recent poll by the National Science Foundation found that only 50 percent of Americans get a good night’s sleep a few nights each week. When interruptions to sleep become a chronic problem, doctors can offer patients a multidisciplinary approach to treating insomnia that teaches them how to sleep.

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  • Salt kicks hypertension up a notch (06/02/05)
    video  Do you think you're doing enough to reduce sodium in your diet by not adding extra dashes from the salt shaker to your dinner plate? That will help, but it’s not nearly enough. The bigger problem is that salt hides in a range of foods - including soup, cereal, frozen dinners and canned vegetables - and the result can be higher blood pressure in people with hypertension (high blood pressure).

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  • Unique dual treatment for liver cancer packs curative punch (06/02/05)
    video  Most often, liver tumors originate as cancer in another part of the body and spread to the liver. Primary liver cancer, or cancer that starts in the liver, is among the most serious and deadly types of cancer. Typically, it’s not discovered till an advanced stage because it causes few distinct symptoms. About 17,500 people are expected to be diagnosed with primary liver cancer this year, and 15,420 will die from it, according to the American Cancer Society.

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  • Zapping the heart back into rhythm: (06/02/05)
    video  If the electrical system in your house was going haywire, you’d call an electrician right away to fix it. But what if the electrical system in your heart was on the fritz? Now, a new option offered at the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center and a handful of other centers nationwide is proving to be a true, lasting cure for the vast majority of people who receive it.

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  • Carr's Wash for Kids is June 11 (06/01/05)
    On June 11, U-M head football coach Lloyd Carr, along with members of the 2005 Wolverine football squad, will host a community car wash from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Michigan stadium to benefit the U-M Health System Campaign to build a new children's and women's hospital.

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  • Gene transfer with herpes virus blocks neuropathic pain (06/01/05)
    U-M research reported in today's Annals of Neurology describes the first successful use of gene transfer, using herpes simplex as a vector, to block neuropathic pain in animals. Current drugs have little effect on this type of pain, so it's a major step toward a new approach to pain management for the many people who suffer from neuropathic pain.

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  • Ob/gyn supply threatened by malpractice insurance costs (06/01/05)
    The high cost of malpractice insurance for some medical specialties affects not only how many doctors are entering the field of obstetrics and gynecology, but also where they offer their widely needed obstetric, prenatal and gynecological care, according to new University of Michigan Health System research.

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May 2005

  • New technique lets cancer patients freeze eggs (05/31/05)
    A new technique might allow women diagnosed with cancer the opportunity to have children when chemotherapy and radiation treatments rob them of their fertility, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found.

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  • Survivors' Day shows there's life after cancer (05/27/05)
    The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center will host a National Survivors’ Day Celebration on Sunday, June 5. The annual event celebrates the lives of anyone living with a history of cancer.

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  • U-M Transplant Center receives HHS Medal of Honor (05/26/05)
    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently awarded the U-M Transplant Center with the Medal of Honor for its efforts to raise the organ donation at U-M to an unprecedented 92 percent.

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  • Sleep-related breathing problems linked with asthma (05/25/05)
    When asthmatics are awake, they can turn to their inhalers to open their airways. But when they sleep, many of them continue to struggle with breathing - and an understanding of their sleep-related problems may help doctors better diagnose and treat their patients’ asthma.

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  • Statins decrease risk of colon cancer (05/25/05)
    People who took a type of cholesterol-lowering drug for five years had nearly half the risk of developing colon cancer, even when they had a family history of the disease or other risk factors.

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  • Medical privacy law hinders research (05/23/05)
    New U-M research reveals a clash between two of the biggest issues in health care today: protecting individual patients’ privacy and improving the quality, safety and cost of medical care for all patients.

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  • Blood pressure drug cuts diabetes risk (05/19/05)
    A drug that controls blood pressure and reduces heart risk also appears to protect against diabetes, especially in high-risk people, a new study led by U-M doctors finds.

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  • Learn skills to manage stress for better health (05/19/05)
    To help decrease the risk of heart disease and other stress-related illness, the University of Michigan Health System’s Preventive Cardiology Clinic regularly offers a six-week course, the Stress Management Skills Group, that teaches how to manage the cause and effects of stress.

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  • Colonoscopy: A woman's best defense against colon cancer (05/18/05)
    A new study has reaffirmed the difference between the sexes - at least when it come to colon cancer detection. It found that colonoscopy is the best screening tool for average-risk women in the detection of colon cancer because other screening tools would miss most advanced pre-cancerous polyps."

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  • Dexter-Ann Arbor run to benefit Mott (05/17/05)
    This year's Dexter-Ann Arbor Run, taking place on June 5, will benefit the U-M Health System's campaign to build a new children's and women's hospital.

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  • An alternative in the prevention of ulcerative colitis (05/16/05)
    A new study from the University of Michigan Health System suggests that there may be better and more cost-effective means to prevent colon cancer in patients with ulcerative colitis than the current standard of care: statins.

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  • Baldrige-winning hospitals a 'revolution' in management (05/16/05)
    Hospital management expert John Griffith boldly declares that a revolution in hospital management is under way."

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  • Cell markers predict if cancer drug is working (05/16/05)
    Counting the amount of a type of normal cell circulating in the blood of people with cancer could predict whether a tumor progresses or responds to therapy, a new study led by the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center has found.

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  • Center for Reproductive Medicine moves, expands (05/16/05)
    For couples with infertility and reproductive disorders, uncertainty and fear about whether they will be able to have children can compound the already difficult search for their underlying medical problems. To help serve them better, the U-M Health System is moving its Center for Reproductive Medicine to a new and larger space.

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  • Heart scan surprises common (05/16/05)
    Nearly half of all patients who get their hearts scanned with a high-speed CT scanner may get a shocking surprise: a diagnosis of a serious problem that has nothing to do with their heart. U-M Cardiovascular Center researchers who made the finding say it points out the importance of having a trained radiologist perform each scan.

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  • Herceptin may have role in bladder cancer (05/16/05)
    A targeted drug shown to improve the outcome of certain breast cancer patients may be of use in the treatment of advanced cases of bladder cancer, according to new research led by the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • MVN offers meningitis vaccinations (05/13/05)
    College students should receive meningitis vaccinations before heading to campus, especially if they plan to live in residence halls. The U-M Michigan Visiting Nurses are offering vaccinations at their Ann Arbor office and at upcoming clinics.

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  • Overnight blood pressure linked to high blood sugar (05/13/05)
    People whose blood pressure doesn't drop overnight can face a number of health problems. Previous research has shown that they can suffer more cardiovascular problems. Now, research at the University of Michigan Health System indicates they also may be at greater risk for diabetes because they have a tendency to have higher levels of blood glucose.

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  • Barriers prevent Hispanics from participating in research (05/12/05)
    UMHS researchers found that many Hispanic people would be more willing to participate in studies if the researcher spoke Spanish, if they felt like the process would have a health benefit to them, if the research had a direct benefit to the Hispanic community and if they could do their part on weekends rather than weekdays.

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  • Older people are better at picking their battles, studies show (05/12/05)
    Older people are less likely than younger people to react aggressively when problems come up in their relationships, University of Michigan research shows.

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  • Americans willing to pay more for greater vaccine coverage (05/10/05)
    A new national web-based study from the U-M Health System found that about 80 percent of adults would be willing to pay an additional $3 to $6 each month in health plan premiums to have their health insurance automatically cover newly recommended vaccines.

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  • Drug use differs considerably among Hispanic subgroups (05/10/05)
    A greater percentage of Hispanic adolescents in eighth grade use drugs than adolescents in the general population, but there are some important differences among various Hispanic groups in their level of involvement, an article from the University of Michigan's Monitoring the Future study shows.

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  • Kids at risk for lead poisoning don't get necessary testing (05/10/05)
    In the first population-based study of its kind, researchers from the U-M Health System’s Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit found that only 53.9 percent of children in Medicaid with elevated blood lead levels identified through screening got the necessary follow-up testing to prevent lead poisoning, and of those children, nearly half still had elevated blood lead levels.

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  • U-M Hospitals and Health Centers awarded for environmental leadership (05/10/05)
    The University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers received the premier national recognition of environmental innovation in health care for its work in reducing waste, virtually eliminating mercury and minimizing the use of toxic products.

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  • New results, trial for Alzheimer's vaccine (05/09/05)
    Training the body’s immune system to fight back against Alzheimer’s disease may still offer a promising option for slowing or even preventing the tragic brain disorder that affects 4.5 million Americans, according to new research results. A new clinical trial will test the theory further."

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  • Ultimate body camera makes its debut at U-M (05/09/05)
    In medicine today, every second counts, every detail matters, and a fast, clear picture of what’s going on inside the body can save a life. Now, a new CT scanner at UMHS - the Lightspeed VCT - - is helping doctors make the most of every second and every detail.

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  • UMHS initiatives helping to take care of our own (05/09/05)
    The MFit Physical Activity for Life Charity Challenge served as the kick-off event for the Healthy Workforce Initiative at the University of Michigan Health System. This program brought together 156 teams with more than 2,000 staff participants; accumulating nearly 3.5 million exercise minutes; and generating more than $10,000 for charity. The eight-week event provided the springboard for the U-M Health System to energize its faculty and staff into making healthier lifestyle choices.

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  • Art students create memory aids for seniors (05/06/05)
    What does a memory look like? Art students have created a range of artworks after meeting with seniors at the Turner Senior Resource Center who are in the early stages of memory loss. An exhibit of their works will run May 13-29.

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  • Doctors form Michigan Bowel Control Program (05/06/05)
    It's a topic many people don't feel comfortable discussing, but bowel disorders affect millions of Americans. To help improve treatment for these patients, doctors from a variety of specialties at U-M have created the Michigan Bowel Control Program.

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  • Doctors wary of stroke drug, but team care may help (05/06/05)
    Forty percent of emergency physicians say they're unlikely to use a stroke drug even in an ideal situation because of its risks of brain bleeding, a new U-M study finds. But team-based stroke care, like that at UMHS, may help give more patients this effective treatment.

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  • Study: Treat depression and pain separately (05/05/05)
    Depression often causes a duet of anguish among people already suffering from chronic pain. But the two conditions retain their independence from one another, and this may explain why medications used to treat patients’ depression might not help them manage their pain, a new study says.

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  • Statement on Don Canham and abdominal aortic aneurysm (05/04/05)
    On Tuesday, May 3, former U-M Athletic Director Donald Canham passed away at University Hospital, as a result of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. This tragic event shines a light on a deadly problem that threatens thousands of Americans, and the need for screening.

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  • Variant of gene TLR4 doubles the risk of developing AMD (05/04/05)
    University of Michigan scientists have identified a variant of a gene that doubles the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a blinding disease for which there is as yet no cure.

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  • Connecting to cure spinal cord injury (05/03/05)
    An estimated 247,000 people have a spinal cord injury in the United States and about 11,000 new cases occur each year, but a "cure" for this catastrophic injury remains elusive. Nevertheless, new science is raising the hope that one day a cure for SCI will be within reach. This conference seeks to educate providers, media and public about the connections between the science, ethics and politics of SCI research.

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  • National SAFE KIDS week (05/02/05)
    National SAFE KIDS week is taking place April 30 through May 7. In celebration, SAFE KIDS of Washtenaw County will encourage local parents to become safety role models for their children to prevent injuries and other dangers.

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April 2005

  • Story ideas for Nurses Week (04/28/05)
    The University of Michigan Health System is joining with other health care organizations around the country in celebrating the many ways that nurses impact the lives of their patients and coworkers.

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  • Summer injuries a concern for adults too (04/28/05)
    video  The summer is traditionally a season of relaxation, recreation and fun for adults and children alike – yet it’s also the most common time for injuries to occur. An expert has some advice to help adults prevent these injuries and enjoy a safe summer.

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  • Summer means scrapes, stings, sprains, bites, burns and other dangers for children and teens (04/28/05)
    video  As the days grow longer and hotter, it's time to bring out the bikes, skates, lawnmowers and boats. But for families with children, it's also time for helmets, kneepads and the watchful eyes of an adult supervisor because summer can be a busy time in emergency rooms."

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  • Turning "yuck" into "yum" for picky eaters (04/28/05)
    video  Believe it or not, children don't develop picky eating habits just to annoy and frustrate their parents. Picky eating is actually believed to be rooted in our natural evolution as humans. But, there are ways to make mealtime less stressful.

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  • U-M launches study looking at how women and men experience - and react to - strokes (04/28/05)
    video  What does it feel like to have a stroke? For some people, the ability to speak or walk disappears in a moment. For others, arms, legs and faces suddenly go numb. And for others, it's a rush of confusion or dizziness. But what if you had a stroke and your symptoms weren't typical?

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  • When drugs collide, health can suffer (04/28/05)
    video  Cardiovascular medications help to prevent heart attack and stroke, saving many people from the number-one killer in the United States. But taking certain over-the-counter drugs or herbal remedies along with them can cause the prescribed cardiovascular drugs to lose their effectiveness or to increase their potency in ways that can be beneficial or harmful."

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  • FDA whistleblower to speak 5/6 (04/26/05)
    On May 6, a free public forum will focus on the role of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in protecting patient safety. The event will begin with remarks by an FDA scientist who has had a "whistleblower" role in recent months, followed by a discussion panel from industry, academia media and consumer groups.

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  • U-M creates nanotechnology institute for medicine (04/22/05)
    The Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and the Biological Sciences will merge expertise and resources across the university to develop and market applications for nanotechnology in medicine.

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  • Heart doctors toss scrubs, put on skates to raise money for transplant patients (04/21/05)
    U-M Health System cardiac surgeons, doctors, nurses and other medical professionals will face-off for the fourth annual Hearts on Ice Hockey Challenge to raise funds for heart transplant patients who cannot afford the cost of their medications."

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  • UMHS plans new children's and women's hospital (04/21/05)
    Today, the U-M Board of Regents approved a $498 million state-of-the-art building project to replace the facility that currently houses the Mott and Women's hospitals. The one-million-square-foot U-M C.S. Mott Children's and Women's Hospital Replacement Project is needed to meet increasing patient demand and accommodate future research, education and clinical care innovations.

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  • Geriatrics social worker wins award (04/20/05)
    Katherine Supiano has been named the 2005 Social Worker of the Year by the University of Michigan Health System Department of Social Work.

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  • Life Sciences Orchestra concert May 5 (04/20/05)
    Pairs of musical pieces by three well-known composers, including a pair of featured soloists, will make up the May 5 concert by the U-M Life Sciences Orchestra, the nation's only performing group for people from health, medical and life sciences fields.

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  • New H.R. administrator announced (04/20/05)
    Deborah Childs has been selected as the University of Michigan Health System's chief Human Resources officer, Larry Warren, Associate Vice President of the U-M Health System, has announced.

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  • Oral cancer campaign urges Detroiters to get checked (04/20/05)
    The Detroit Oral Cancer Prevention Project has launched a citywide campaign to lower the oral cancer death rate in Detroit.

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  • Compound from Chinese medicine shows promise in cancer (04/19/05)
    A compound derived from cottonseed oil could help improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy at treating head and neck cancer, researchers have found. The findings could lead to a treatment that provides an effective option to surgically removing the cancer, helping patients preserve vital organs involved in speech and swallowing.

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  • Disabled at work: Hidden cost of jobs for older Americans (04/19/05)
    About one-third of all disabled people in their 50s—and half of all disabled men—became disabled because of their jobs, a new study shows.

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  • Healing Foods Pyramid co-creator reacts to USDA pyramid (04/19/05)
    Creators of the Healing Foods Pyramid from the University of Michigan say the U.S. Department of Agriculture?s new food guidelines are a ?step in the right direction,? but they say their pyramid goes further."

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  • Heart failure drug risks studied (04/19/05)
    A drug that helps heart failure patients survive a crisis may actually increase their risk of dying in the first month after they leave the hospital, according to a new study by researchers from the U-M Cardiovascular Center and North Shore University Hospital in New York.

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  • Lung cancer study stopped early (04/19/05)
    Researchers have closed a randomized clinical trial comparing gefitinib (Iressa) against placebo following chemotherapy and radiation for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that had spread only to nearby tissues or lymph nodes. Review of interim data indicated that gefitinib would not improve survival.

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  • Michigan Visiting Nurses offer bone loss screenings (04/19/05)
    The University of Michigan Health System's Michigan Visiting Nurses (MVN) and Kroger are making it easy for you to get tested for low bone mass - which can lead to osteoporosis - by offering screenings throughout the area in May.

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  • Some who seem healthy might be at risk of heart attack (04/19/05)
    Obesity is a risk factor for heart disease for people without other risk factors.

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  • LSI adds top scientists to interdisciplinary faculty (04/18/05)
    The Life Sciences Institute (LSI) today announced the hiring of six additional faculty members. The new LSI cohort, recruited from across the country, adds to the broad array of scientific approaches and disciplines that the Institute is assembling.

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  • U-M researcher leads development of health care standards (04/18/05)
    Researchers, clinicians and policy makers from 26 countries around the globe have worked for three years on a new integrated suite of tools for assessing health care.

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  • Free PVD Screening (04/15/05)
    Pain in your legs can keep you from walking – but it can also be a sign of major problems affecting your body’s blood vessels. On Saturday, May 21, physicians and staff at the University of Michigan Health System will offer a free health screening for those concerned about leg pain.

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  • U-M partnership brings radiation therapy to Mt. Pleasant (04/15/05)
    The University of Michigan Health System’s Department of Radiation Oncology signed a partnership agreement this week with Central Michigan Community Hospital in Mt. Pleasant to provide world-class cancer care closer to home.

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  • Women Not Given Same Tests for Stroke (04/14/05)
    Women who have strokes are less likely to receive some standard tests to help diagnose the type of stroke and determine treatment, according to research that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology 57th Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, Fla., April 9 - 16, 2005.

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  • New ring helps heart failure patients (04/13/05)
    A new heart valve ring co-invented by a U-M surgeon appears to help congestive heart failure patients regain lost heart function, reversing the disease’s effects on heart structure in two ways and easing their disabling symptoms.

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  • Teaming up for patient safety (04/13/05)
    Hospital-based doctors around Southeast Michigan are teaming up to prevent medical errors and oversights, and improve patient safety, through a new effort funded by the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation.

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  • 50 years after Salk, polio's effects still linger (04/12/05)
    Fifty years after the University of Michigan’s Thomas Francis Jr., M.D., announced a “safe, effective, and potent “ vaccine that would end one of the most virulent of childhood diseases, the effects of paralytic polio still linger. Today, experts in the UMHS Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation are working to treat polio survivors at its Post-Polio Clinic, learn more about polio's effects through research, and educate future health care providers today to care for aging polio survivors.

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  • Consent forms should be more readable (04/11/05)
    Many consent forms are written above the recommended reading level and can be hard for many people to comprehend.

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  • $25M grant from Mott Foundation for children's/women's facility (04/08/05)
    Today, history came full circle, when the C.S. Mott Foundation granted $25 million to the U-M Health System to help construct a new, state-of-the-art building for its children’s and women’s health services."

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  • Learn Healthy Habits for Life (04/08/05)
    The University of Michigan Health System’s MFit Health Promotion Division will soon begin another series of the MFit Weight Management Program: Healthy Habits for Life, a unique program that combines group support, individual guidance and tools for developing healthy eating and physical activity habits while providing support for overcoming psychological barriers.""

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  • Insomnia linked to falls in elderly (04/06/05)
    Contrary to conventional wisdom that sleeping pills raise the risk of dangerous falls among older people, a new U-M study finds that untreated insomnia, not sleep-aiding pills, is strongly linked to the risk of falls.

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  • Mothers with mental illnesses benefit from extended family support (04/06/05)
    Mothers with mental illnesses who lived with their children and extended family fared significantly better than mothers who live only with their children or with their kids and a spouse/partner, a newly published University of Michigan study indicated.

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  • Sense of belonging helps people suffering depression (04/06/05)
    Having a sense of belonging with family, friends and coworkers can help relieve symptoms of depression, according to research from the University of Michigan.

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  • Does money buy happiness? (04/05/05)
    Could your financial health make a difference in your mental health when your physical health fails? New U-M research suggests that people who are better-off financially suffer less of a decline in their happiness and well-being when they become disabled, compared with less wealthy people.

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  • Chronic inflammation leads to gastric cancer (04/04/05)
    When it comes to gastric cancer, too little stomach acid can be just as dangerous as too much, according to scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School. Both extremes create inflammatory changes in the stomach lining and a condition called chronic atrophic gastritis, which over time often leads to cancer.

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  • ’Roid rage, depression and suicide: U-M addiction expert warns of dangers of teen steroid use (04/01/05)
    video  Suspicions of steroid use are clouding Major League Baseball at the start of its 2005 season, but a bigger problem than the image of the national pastime is the health impact of anabolic steroids on adolescents."

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  • Crawling out of the deep hole of cancer depression (04/01/05)
    video  Increasingly, health care providers are realizing the many mental health issues involved in a cancer diagnosis. It starts with the adjustment of hearing a diagnosis and understanding what it means and continues through the grueling nature of most cancer treatments and the uncertainty and worry that the cancer will come back or spread.

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  • Listen to your voice: Changes could mean danger (04/01/05)
    video  Many people take their voices for granted. For people whose careers revolve around speaking, such as teachers, salespeople, clergy and receptionists, untreated voice problems can greatly interfere with their work. It’s important to take voice symptoms seriously. Such symptoms can include hoarseness; loss of vocal range; loss of volume or ability to project a loud voice; and loss of endurance. Neck muscle pain or throat soreness after voice use can also indicate a problem.""

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  • Seniors: Not ready to slow down? (04/01/05)
    video  While senior athletes are taking gyms and sports arenas across America by storm with the mentality and ambition of athletes half their age, their aging shoulders, knees and muscles may be paying the ultimate price.

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  • Sight for sore eyes (04/01/05)
    video  Basketball, baseball, soccer, paintball – it’s all fun and games until someone gets an elbow, ball or paint pellet in the eye. Sports-related eye injuries – which affect more than 40,000 people in the United States a year – can lead to considerable loss of vision.

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  • U-M Medical School one of nation's best (04/01/05)
    The U-M Medical School consistently ranks as one of the top 10 medical schools in the U.S., according to U.S. News & World Report. This year, U-M is ranked 9th.

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March 2005

  • New imaging method shows if cancer treatment is working (03/29/05)
    A special type of MRI scan that measures the flow of water molecules through the brain can help doctors determine early in the course of brain cancer regimen if a patient’s tumor will shrink, a new study shows.

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  • Pain expert to address racial gaps (03/29/05)
    For people suffering from pain, race matters. Racial and ethnic minorities are not treated for conditions such as arthritis and backache in the same way as Caucasians, says University of Michigan Health System pain expert Carmen R. Green, M.D., who will address the issue during an April 2 speech at the American Pain Society’s 24th annual scientific meeting in Boston.

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  • Kidney-protective protein found by U-M scientists (03/28/05)
    University of Michigan scientists have identified a new and unusual protein that reduces, in laboratory mice, kidney damage caused by chronic renal disease and acute toxic injuries.

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  • ‘Kickin’ It’ for youth tobacco awareness (03/25/05)
    To raise awareness in young people about the dangers of tobacco use to help them avoid the lure of tobacco marketing campaigns, the U-M Health System will host "Kickin' It," an event that combines soccerinstruction with tobacco education activities for youngsters.

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  • Innovative tools measure the health of the UMMS (03/24/05)
    The Medical School is in the forefront nationwide with its web-based system of tools that allow for quick data analyses and provide an opportunity for financial, space and faculty planning many years into the future.

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  • Hockey pros to skate again for Mott (03/21/05)
    On April 15, Yost Ice Arena in Ann Arbor will host an all-star line-up of professional hockey player for the "Pro Skate for Mott" event. The hockey event will benefit the U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital campaign to build a new children's and women's hospital.

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  • Possible risk associated with common heart drug (03/21/05)
    Doctors at North Shore University Hospital in New York and the University of Michigan report that nesiritide worsens kidney function when used as a treatment of acutely decompensated heart failure.

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  • The U-M Hospitals makes Solucient's top 100 (03/17/05)
    The University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers has been selected as one of the 2004 Solucient 100 Top Hospitals ® in the country - one of 15 honorees in the major teaching hospitals category, according to the results of the Solucient 100 Top Hospitals: Benchmarks for Success study.

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  • U-M call center distinguished as Center of Excellence (03/17/05)
    The University of Michigan Health System’s Office of Interactive Marketing call center is the first in an academic medical center to receive certification as a Center of Excellence by BenchmarkPortal, an affiliate of Purdue University’s Center for Customer Driven Quality and source for Customer Relationship Management best practices information for call centers nationwide.

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  • In emergency, flu vaccine could be made quickly in existing facilities (03/16/05)
    In an emergency such as a pandemic outbreak or last year's vaccine shortage, the influenza vaccine could be produced twice as fast using cell cultures in existing biopharmaceutical manufacturing facilities, according to Henry Wang, a University of Michigan professor of biomedical and chemical engineering

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  • Leptin: A 'missing link' between obesity and diabetes? (03/16/05)
    New findings in mice may help explain the link between obesity and diabetes, and what it takes to turn an overweight person into a person with diabetes. Leptin, a hormone already known for its role in appetite and weight gain, may play a major role, say U-M and Harvard researchers.

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  • Polymers with copper show promise for implanted sensors (03/16/05)
    Developing chemical sensors that can be placed in the bloodstream or under the skin to continuously monitor oxygen, acidity (pH), or glucose levels is a major challenge for analytical chemists and biomedical engineers. The problem is, the body responds to these foreign objects in ways that interfere with their ability to accurately measure blood chemistry.

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  • Taking aim with nanoparticle PEBBLEs (03/16/05)
    In what sounds like a modern-day version of the David and Goliath story, University of Michigan scientists hope to slay a big killer with pebbles. In this case, the killer is not a fearsome giant, but a dreaded disease: cancer. And the pebbles are not the kind you hurl from slingshots; they're nanoscale polymer beads known as Photonic Explorers for Biomedical use with Biologically Localized Embedding (PEBBLEs).

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  • Small molecule inhibits protein involved in cancer (03/11/05)
    Researchers have discovered a small molecule that could be the first step in developing a new drug that may one day be able to treat multiple types of cancer."

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  • Women less likely to get top heart attack care (03/09/05)
    Efforts to improve the quality of heart attack care in hospitals are helping to save lives and prevent complications, but women are apparently not benefiting as much as men, a new U-M Cardiovascular Center study finds.

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  • Having cataract surgery? New accommodating lens restores youthful vision (03/08/05)
    People who have cataract surgery may not have to worry about misplacing their reading glasses any longer, thanks to a new implantable lens that moves like the eye’s natural lens.

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  • U-M Neuropathy Center opens (03/08/05)
    The painful nerve damage known as neuropathy affects more than 20 million Americans - including half of all people with diabetes. Millions more are at risk but don’t know it. Now, the U-M has been designated by the Neuropathy Association as one of the first four Neuropathy Centers in the nation, and will launch the center March 9 with a kickoff event.

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  • St. John's wort/Plavix interaction found (03/07/05)
    The widely used herbal remedy St. John’s wort appears to amplify the action of the popular blood-thinning drug clopidogrel, sold as Plavix, a small new U-M clinical study finds. The effect could increase the risk of bleeding among those who take both substances."

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  • U-M Integrative Medicine unveils Healing Foods Pyramid (03/07/05)
    The new pyramid emphasizes foods known to have healing benefits, plant-based choices, variety and balance, support of a healthful environment, and mindful eating.

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  • Bungled insulin production key to diabetes? (03/04/05)
    For the first time, U-M diabetes researchers have shown that the insulin molecule is often made incorrectly inside cells of the pancreas, and that the resulding misfolded molecules may build up inside cells and not reach the bloodstream. The finding may help explain a lot about both types of diabetes.

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  • 'Outing' the barriers to health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender communities (03/04/05)
    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people often face financial, personal and cultural barriers when attempting to access health care. To raise awareness of the specific health needs of these unique patients, the University of Michigan Medical School student group, Bisexuals, Gays, Lesbians, and Allies in Medicine, has coordinated a week-long series of events, from Monday, March 14 * Friday, March 18, that will coincide with National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Health Awareness Week."""

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  • 50 is the golden age to begin routine colonoscopies (03/03/05)
    video  Colon cancer, a cancer of the large intestine, is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. It’s also the leading cause of cancer death among non-smokers. The American Cancer Society estimated that in 2004, there were about 145,400 cases of colon cancer diagnosed, and approximately 56,300 colon cancer deaths in the U.S. Colonoscopies are the best way to prevent colorectal cancer and increase survival rate following diagnosis,

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  • Color your diet with foods to prevent cancer (03/03/05)
    video  The jury may be out on whether a low-carb diet is the best way to lose weight. But moderating the carbohydrates you eat could help prevent cancer. It’s clear for all the top cancers that diet has an influence on your risk of getting cancers.

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  • Discovering the source of back pain (03/03/05)
    video  EMG testing can provide answers that MRI can’t. Expert says both kinds of tests have their strengths, and a current study at U-M is looking at the MRI scan and EMG test to find out which one is better at identifying the source of back pain.

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  • Saliva test may spot gum and heart disease (03/03/05)
    A self-contained saliva test kit developed by a University of Michigan School of Dentistry professor in collaboration with government agencies and the private sector is now undergoing limited preliminary testing at two U-M sites.

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  • The buzz about energy drinks (03/03/05)
    video  Highly caffeinated energy drinks – such as Red Bull, Go-Fast! and Monster – market themselves as sources of increased energy and concentration. But are these drinks good for you? An addiction specialist raises some concerns about the beverages, particularly when they are mixed with alcohol, ingested before intensive exercise or used by children."

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  • Kidney disease and blindness share common genetic defect (03/02/05)
    Scientists at the U-M Medical School have discovered a gene called NPHP5 and found mutations in this gene that cause a rare genetic disease called Senior-Loken syndrome. Children with this syndrome develop cystic kidney disease as well as a form of blindness called retinitis pigmentosa.

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  • M-CARE launches new plan (03/02/05)
    With a new consumer-directed health plan that includes a health savings account, preventive care and catastrophic coverage, M-CARE has rounded out its line of health insurance products available to employers and employees in Southeast Michigan.

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  • Men get screened for prostaste cancer, not colon cancer (03/02/05)
    Fewer than half of men surveyed were up-to-date with colon cancer screenings, according to a new study. What men do pay attention to is prostate cancer. And that has researchers thinking an annual prostate cancer screening might be a good opportunity to urge men to be screened for colon cancer too.

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  • Mott campaign gets $4M grant from Carls Foundation (03/02/05)
    The U-M C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital announced today it will receive a major grant of $4 million from The Carls Foundation, which will advance the hospital’s campaign to build a new facility.

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February 2005

  • Diabetes prevention worth every penny (02/28/05)
    It would cost a lot to help 40 million Americans take steps to overcome their high risk for Type 2 diabetes. But a new study shows for the first time that spending money now on diabetes prevention would be cost-effective in the long run.

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  • College depression conference March 22-23 (02/24/05)
    The U-M Depression Center will hold its third annual Depression on College Campuses Conference March 22-23 in Ann Arbor, focusing on the stigma that keeps many college students from seeking help.

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  • Physician group tapped for Medicare demonstration project (02/24/05)
    U-M hospitals, health centers and Faculty Group Practice are the only site in Michigan participating in the CMS disease management project that seeks to demonstrate the value of increased care coordination.

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  • Study looks at detection of early-stage liver cancer (02/24/05)
    A two-year study to validate a test to detect early-stage liver cancer has been initiated by the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, at six centers across the United States, including the U-M Health System."

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  • Protein builds bigger, better bones (02/22/05)
    Leaping tall buildings in a single bound may be out of the question, but the genetically engineered “supermice” in Ormond MacDougald’s laboratory at the University of Michigan Medical School are definitely stronger than average. With bone mass up to four times greater than ordinary mice, these research animals could hold the secret to new drugs for preventing or treating osteoporosis and other human diseases.

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  • Mott hosts annual Child Watch Conference on March 8 (02/17/05)
    On March 8, Mott and the U-M student organization Medstart, will host the 5th annual Child Watch Conference to promote the importance of after-school programs.

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  • Stroke Program honored, expanded (02/16/05)
    The U-M Stroke Program has received a national recognition for high-quality care, while its advanced research continues and it expands its faculty and clinical services.

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  • ER violence not uncommon (02/15/05)
    Three-quarters of Michigan emergency physicians surveyed said they had experienced at least one violent incident in the last year, from verbal threats to stalking, according to a new study by U-M researchers.

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  • Gene therapy restores hearing in deaf animals (02/14/05)
    After 11 years of intensive research, scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School have succeeded in using gene therapy to grow new auditory hair cells and restore hearing in deafened adult guinea pigs - a major step forward in the search for new ways to treat hearing loss in humans.

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  • Ill people happier than expected, study finds (02/10/05)
    Despite what able-bodied healthy people might think, people with severe illnesses and disabilities don’t wallow in misery and self-pity all the time. In fact, a new U-M study finds, such patients on the whole may be just as happy as those without major medical conditions.

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  • Working moms need to negotiate better terms on childcare burden (02/09/05)
    A recent study from the University of Michigan suggests that the Super Mom syndrome is real, and that many married working women will volunteer to work a "second shift" as primary parent that's equal to the time anticipated by full-time, stay-at-home moms.

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  • Angioplasty delays too long for transfer patients (02/08/05)
    Heart attack patients who need an emergency angioplasty to reopen clogged arteries are waiting far longer than recommended for this potentially life-saving treatment, because of delays in transferring them from hospitals that don't do the procedure to those that do, according to a new Yale-U-M study. Released 2/7 by the American Heart Association.

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  • SAFE KIDS to offer safety seat inspections (02/08/05)
    Studies show the vast majority of car seats are used incorrectly, making a child 3.5 times more likely to be seriously injured in a car crash. To raise awareness and prevent avoidable injury to children, SAFE KIDS Washtenaw County and Carnahan Chevrolet will provide free car seat inspections.

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  • High-tech heart center launched (02/04/05)
    The U-M's role as a leader in the use of high-tech devices to help pump the blood of patients with failing hearts will be strengthened with the founding of a new Center for Circulatory Support, and a $450,000 gift from Terumo Cardiovascular Systems.

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  • Healthy heart, healthy mind? (02/03/05)
    video  You know that watching your weight, quitting smoking, cutting back on fatty foods and exercising regularly will help your heart. But did you know that these steps might also help your brain, and protect your memory?

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  • New treatment rivals chemotherapy for lymphoma (02/03/05)
    A new form of treatment for lymphoma that takes a fraction of the time of traditional chemotherapy with fewer side effects caused tumors to shrink in 95 percent of patients, a new study by researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center found."

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  • Sammy the Squirrel Stars In 'Booster Seat Story' For Young Children (02/03/05)
    NOTE: Press release located on AAA web server, you will leave the UM web server to view this release. In a collaborative effort designed to appeal directly to young children, AAA and the University of Michigan Program for Injury Research and Education (UMPIRE) have authored a color storybook and a black-and-white coloring book that promote booster seat use among child passengers from 4-8 years of age.

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  • Saving lives in a heartbeat (02/03/05)
    video  Cardiac arrest can strike with frightening speed. The patient may descend from apparently good health to unconsciousness, without warning and within seconds. Ideally, an ambulance could arrive in time. But since emergency personnel often need eight or nine minutes to reach a patient, a device called an in-home defibrillator might help save some of the 450,000 people who die each year from cardiac arrest.

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  • The coming diabetes explosion: a by-product of America’s obesity epidemic (02/03/05)
    video  Being overweight or obese puts you at a very high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, which carries many significant health threats. The most serious of these health risks is heart disease—the leading cause of death related to diabetes. So what can we do to reduce our risk for diabetes and diabetes-related heart disease? Eat healthy and get active!"

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  • Valentine’s Day traditions can be good for the heart (02/03/05)
    video  Chocolate, wine and romance aren’t just the quickest ways to your true love’s heart. A University of Michigan Health System cardiologist says these Valentine’s Day traditions are also the way to a healthy heart."

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  • U-M scientists develop first micro-machined mechanical cochlea (02/02/05)
    Scientists at U-M have developed the first micro-machined, life-sized, mechanical cochlea, the tiny organ responsible for converting acoustic vibrations into electrical signals for the brain to "read" and interpret as different sounds."

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  • Gene therapy promising for growing tooth-supporting bone (02/01/05)
    A University of Michigan research team has found that introducing a growth factor protein into a mouth wound using gene therapy helped generate bone around dental implants, according to a new paper in the February issue of the journal Molecular Therapy.

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  • What do new proteins and immune cells have in common? (02/01/05)
    A signaling protein called IRE1, which helps stressed-out cells make new proteins, may be more versatile and important than scientists believed. A new study reveals the surprising finding that this same signaling protein is required for the formation of immune cells called B lymphocytes.

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January 2005

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