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2006 News Releases

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December 2006

  • M-CARE sale receives final approvals (12/29/06)
    Michigan's Attorney General and the state Office of Financial and Insurance Services have approved the proposed sale of the M-CARE managed care organization by the University of Michigan to Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and its Blue Care Network subsidiary. The completion of the approval process clears the way for the sale to be closed (finalized) on Dec. 31.

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  • For kids with high BP, surgery can help when medicines fail (12/28/06)
    High blood pressure may seem like something that only adults get, but children can develop it too - and it can pose serious risks to their hearts, brains and lives. A new study shows that for kids with a rare but especially dangerous form of hypertension, surgery is the best option.

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  • Blood transfusions may raise heart surgery patients' infection risk (12/20/06)
    Blood transfusions save the lives of millions of heart surgery patients and others each year. But a new study suggests that patients who receive transfusions during heart bypass surgery have a higher risk of developing potentially dangerous infections, and dying, after their operation.

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  • UMHS pharmaceutical rep visit, sample & gift policy (12/14/06)
    The U-M Health System was one of the first medical institutions in the country to place strong limitations on the interactions between our clinicians and representatives of companies that make or sell medications, medical devices or other products. We were also one of the first to eliminate the use of drug samples in clinics and hospitals.

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  • Flu shot effective against drifted influenza; nasal spray vaccine less so (12/13/06)
    During a year in which the circulating strains of influenza showed genetic differences from the strains in vaccines, the traditional killed-virus flu shot was found to be effective in preventing influenza in healthy adults. The live attenuated-virus nasal spray vaccine also prevented illnesses but was less effective.

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  • UMHS awarded grant for Interpreter Services (12/13/06)
    The University of Michigan Health System has been selected as one of 10 hospitals nationwide to participate in Speaking Together: National Language Services Network, a national program to improve the quality of health care provided to patients with limited English proficiency.

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  • Cardiovascular Ctr. named among nation's best (12/12/06)
    The U-M Cardiovascular Center has once again been named one of the nation's best places for heart and vascular care. In fact, the CVC performed better than the average of the other top 30 centers in the country on many measures.

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  • Dearborn fire fighters spread holiday cheer at Trauma Burn Center (12/11/06)
    On Tuesday, Dec. 12, fire fighters from the Dearborn Fire Fighters Burn Drive will visit the University of Michigan Trauma Burn Center to distribute gifts to burn-injured children during the centers annual holiday party.

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  • Improving mobility among older adults with tai chi, balance program (12/11/06)
    A new study suggests that a program focusing on increasing step length and speed is more effective at improving mobility and balance among older adults than tai chi. While tai chi - a Chinese martial art form consisting of slow, rotational movements and weight-shifting - offers many benefits, the researchers say, theyre not as great as those produced by a balance-training program.

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  • A new approach to growing heart muscle (12/08/06)
    It looks, contracts and responds almost like natural heart muscle - even though it was grown in the lab. U-M Cardiovascular Center researchers are reporting a new advance that brings scientists another step closer to the goal of creating replacement parts for damaged human hearts, or eventually growing an entirely new heart from just a spoonful of loose heart cells.

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  • Life Sciences Orchestra plays Jan. 13 (12/08/06)
    The U-M Life Sciences Orchestra, made up of doctors, nurses, scientists, staff, students and others from around the U-M's health and life science community, will play a free concert on Saturday, Jan. 13 at Hill Auditorium. U-M President Mary Sue Coleman will give the opening remarks.

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  • Maternal weight, glucose tolerance affect Mexican-American newborns (12/07/06)
    Mothers' blood sugar levels and weight gain during pregnancyas well as their weight before pregnancymay predict their infants' unhealthy birth weights, according to research conducted by a team of University of Michigan researchers and Detroit health care providers.

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  • Sleep troubles mar alcohol recovery (12/06/06)
    The first few months of recovery from an alcohol problem are hard enough. But a new study gives further evidence that sleep problems -- or even a person's perception of their sleep problems -- may actually get in the way of that recovery.

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  • A blue Christmas: Spotting the signs of elderly holiday depression (12/04/06)
    video  For older adults, winter time and the holidays can bring on a very real case of depression. So when youre home for the holidays, U-M experts encourage families to keep their eyes and ears open for signs of depression in older relatives, and not be afraid to speak up and reach out.

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  • All I want for Christmas is a toy with a mute button (12/04/06)
    video  From traditional noisemakers like toy guns and musical instruments to talking dolls and animated stuffed animals, many toys today are loud enough to cause permanent hearing damage in children. To protect kids hearing, a U-M audiologist offers parents some tips for picking toys that are safe for their childrens ears this holiday season.

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  • Former NFL stars son tackles nerve disorder with help from U-M doctors (12/04/06)
    video  When former NFL great Lomas Browns son Trey was born with brachial plexus palsy, a condition that affects the nerves passing from the neck to the arm, the family sought help from a unique multidisciplinary clinic at the University of Michigan. Today, Trey can use his arm for everyday activities, and is even able to throw a football in the yard with his dad.

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  • U-M expert offers tips for people with diabetes to manage holidays with ease (12/04/06)
    video  For the more than 18 million Americans estimated to have diabetes, holiday food, parties, alcohol and stress can make it challenging to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. To help people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes survive the holiday season, a U-M expert offers seven strategies to manage holiday eating and stress with ease.

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November 2006

  • Men with prostate cancer more likely to have family history (11/30/06)
    African-American men with prostate cancer were more likely to report a family history of prostate cancer and breast cancer among siblings than men who did not have prostate cancer, according to researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Half of patients change cancer treatment after 2nd opinion (11/29/06)
    More than half of breast cancer patients who sought a second opinion from a multidisciplinary tumor board received a change in their recommended treatment plan, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Holiday tip sheet for reporters and editors (11/28/06)
    Since December is a notoriously difficult time to fill up the newspapers and news broadcasts, we've collected numerous story ideas that can be done throughout the next month. Some are holiday-related, some are events and others are evergreen features that can come in handy on a slow news day.

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  • Improving breast screenings for Native Americans (11/28/06)
    University of Michigan radiologists piloted a program to improve mammography for rural Native American women using digital mammography and satellite capability to send images to radiologists in Ann Arbor, Mich. The women received test results in less than an hour, and 72 percent of those who needed additional images had those tests done immediately.

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  • Pain of fibromyalgia is real (11/28/06)
    Many people with fibromyalgia - a debilitating pain syndrome that affects 2 to 4 percent of the population - have faced the question of whether the condition is real. Increasingly, though, the scientific knowledge about fibromyalgia is growing, and a new paper from the University of Michigan Health System says there are overwhelming data that the condition is real, is characterized by a lower pain threshold and is associated with genetic factors that can make some people more likely to develop fibromyalgia.

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  • 12 ideas for healthy holiday gifts (11/20/06)
    Thinking of giving cookies, fudge or a box of chocolates as a holiday gift? Thats so 2005. This year, think about giving something healthy to your loved ones, co-workers, neighbors and friends. Caroline R. Richardson, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School, offers some guidance for buying healthy gifts that the recipient will actually enjoy.

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  • NHLBI and CMS Launch Large Study of Home Oxygen Therapy for COPD (11/20/06)
    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is launching the largest randomized clinical trial of the effectiveness and safety of long-term, home oxygen therapy for COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). The six-year, $28 million project will study patients with moderate disease.

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  • U-M Regents approve new research institute (11/17/06)
    The U-Michigan Regents have approved the creation of the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research. The trans-institutional academic unit will report to Robert Kelch, M.D., U-M executive vice president for medical affairs. The virtual institute will provide infrastructure to connect scientists across the University in order to accelerate and strengthen all research at the university related to human health. The current Center for the Advancement of Clinical Research will become the foundation of the infrastructure for the new institute.

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  • Hormone therapy may improve trip down memory lane (11/16/06)
    Research from the U-M Health System suggests that hormone therapy might help women retain certain memory functions. In a new study, they report that a group of postmenopausal women showed more brain activity during a visual memory test than did women who were not taking the hormone therapy.

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  • MVN offers Nov. and Dec. flu shot clinics (11/16/06)
    It's not too late to get your flu shot! U-M's Michigan Visiting Nurses will offer flu shot clinics throughout late-November and December. Health officials say it is still effective to get a flu shot during this time.

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  • UMHHC launches computerized system to improve delivery of care (11/16/06)
    The University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers has begun implementation of a system-wide computerized physician order-entry program - known CareLink -- that is designed to increase efficiency and decrease errors.

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  • Nanoparticles target brain cancer (11/15/06)
    video  Tiny particles one-billionth of a meter in size can be loaded with high concentrations of drugs designed to kill brain cancer. Whats more, these nanoparticles can be used to image and track tumors as well as destroy them, according to researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Study: Transfer criteria could improve intensive care for children (11/15/06)
    Transferring critically ill or injured child from a level II pediatric intensive care unit to a highly specialized, or level I, pediatric ICU can greatly improve a patients chance for survival. Researchers at Mott hope by gaining a better understanding of the characteristics and outcomes of inter-hospital pediatric ICU transfers, new research findings will work to improve care for these critically ill children, and help to establish criteria for inter-hospital transfers. .

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  • Study: To cover the uninsured, ask public for help (11/14/06)
    Many states, counties and cities are working to provide new health insurance options to the 45 million Americans who lack health coverage. But the devils in the details of what to cover and what to charge. A new study suggests that the answer may lie with involving the public in the decision process.

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  • M-CAREs Medicaid plan recognized as one of the top health plans by U.S. News & World Report/NCQA (11/13/06)
    M-CAID, M-CAREs Medicaid HMO, placed 11th in the nation according to the U.S. News & World Report and the National Committee for Quality Assurances (NCQA) Americas Best Health Plans 2006 rankings. In 2005, M-CAID placed 21st in the nation.

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  • U-M launches one of nation's first sleep professorships (11/10/06)
    The U-M has become one of the first institutions in the nation to create a professorship devoted entirely to the study of sleep and the treatment of sleep disorders. Created with $500,000 in contributions made in memory of Michael S. Aldrich, M.D., the founder of the U-M Sleep Disorders Center, it will be filled by Ronald Chervin, M.D., M.S., current director of the center.

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  • U-M Medical School awarded grant for outreach to underserved areas (11/09/06)
    Thanks to a $146,200 grant from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation, the U-M Medical School is developing a program that encourages medical students to work in the state's underserved rural and urban areas. The funds will be used to develop and implement a four-week training rotation for fourth-year medical students to work in clinics in underserved urban communities, choosing from one of five clinics in the Detroit area and six in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area.

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  • Transplanted cells restore visual function in mice (11/08/06)
    U-M and British scientists have successfully transplanted light-sensing cells called photoreceptors directly into the eyes of mice and restored their visual function. The achievement is based on a novel technology in which the cells are introduced at a particular stage in their development -- an approach developed at the U-M Kellogg Eye Center.

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  • New brain chemistry differences found in depressed women (11/07/06)
    A new brain study from the U-M Depression Center finds major differences between women with serious depression and healthy women in a brain-chemical system thats crucial to stress and emotions.

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  • Iron-deficient infants continue to lag behind peers as teens (11/07/06)
    Costa Rican teens who were iron-deficient as infants continue to lag behind their peers in cognitive test scores, with a wider gap for children at lower socioeconomic levels, according to study results published in the November issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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  • Briarwood Mall hosts special shopping event on Dec. 3 to benefit Mott (11/06/06)
    On Sunday Dec. 3, Briarwood Mall will host a special shopping event to raise funds to help construct a Ronald McDonald House within the new $523 million C.S. Mott Children's Hospital. For its first Shop, Share & Care event, Briarwood Mall is offering shoppers exclusive sales, discounts and free giveaways from many of its 130 retailers. To take part, shoppers must purchase a wristband for $20.

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  • Dose of Reality Medical School blog (11/06/06)
    video  Just about every network on television features a show about young doctors and medical students in training. How realistic are they? Whats the experience really like? The U-M Medical School recently launched the Dose of Reality blogs to help answer those questions. The site enables medical students to share with others their thoughts, feelings, triumphs and frustrations.

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  • Exciting times for people with diabetes means few excuses for high blood sugar (11/06/06)
    video  A generation ago, there was just one kind of pill that could help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels down. But today, virtually anyone with diabetes can find an option that will work for them, and keep their blood sugar low enough to prevent or delay long-term problems like heart attacks, blindness, amputation and kidney failure.

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  • Holiday heartburn: Tasty treats may trigger acid reflux (11/06/06)
    video  For the 15 million Americans who experience chronic heartburn, or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), the holidays can be especially painful. To help people with heartburn survive the holidays, a U-M expert dishes up some advice to keep your stomach and esophagus merry and acid-free this holiday season.

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  • Mutant gene causes severe kidney disease in infants (11/06/06)
    Scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School have discovered a previously unknown cause for a severe, early-onset form of kidney disease and renal failure in children: recessive mutations in a gene called phospholipase C epsilon or PLCE1.

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  • Women catching up to men in lung cancer deaths (11/06/06)
    video  Lung cancer is the No. 1 cancer-related killer in the United States. And while men are more likely to die from lung cancer than women, the trend is starting to change. U-M experts say women are at high risk for developing lung cancer, particularly those women who smoke, and there is a greater risk of dying from lung cancer than from breast cancer.

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October 2006

  • New perspective on rheumatoid arthritis (10/31/06)
    Scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School have found evidence that challenges current thinking about the cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic inflammatory disease that damages joints, causes pain, loss of movement, and bone deformities in 2.1 million Americans.

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  • Suicide attempt rate for blacks higher than previously reported: U-M study (10/31/06)
    New research indicates that blacks in the United States have a lifetime prevalence of attempted suicide of about 4 percent, a rate comparable with the general population, but higher than previous estimates.

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  • Tastes great! Study probes brain's pleasure response (10/31/06)
    We all have tastes we love, and tastes we hate. And yet, our taste for certain flavors and foods can change over time, as we get older or we get tired of eating the same old thing. Now, a new U-M study gives new evidence about whats going on in the brain when we taste something we like, or develop a liking for something we once hated.

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  • Walk teaches community about prematurity, prevention (10/31/06)
    One in eight babies in the United States is born before 36 weeks gestation. Premature birth is the No. 1 cause of death in infants during their first year of life. In Michigan alone, more than 15,500 babies are born prematurely each year. To help increase awareness and raise funds for research, the University of Michigan Health System and the March of Dimes will host the seventh annual Health Walk Tuesday, Nov. 14.

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  • Churches aim to help body as well as soul (10/27/06)
    A new program aimed at helping African-Americans improve their diet and fitness is taking advantage of a higher power. The church plays an important role in the social lives of many African-Americans. Thats why Universityof Michiganresearchers are targeting black churches to help bring a message of healthier lifestyle choices to their congregation.

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  • Vending goes healthy thanks to C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital (10/26/06)
    In partnership with the University of Michigan Health Systems Retail Food Services, the MFit Health Promotion Division, Michigan Healthy Community and AVI Food Systems, and C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, 50 percent of all the options within cold food, snack and beverage machines meet healthier nutrition guidelines for fat, sugar, sodium, cholesterol and fiber.

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  • Hormone therapy shapes childrens height to social norms (10/25/06)
    More than 50 years ago, otherwise healthy tall girls were given estrogen therapy to stunt their growth to make them more socially attractive. While estrogen therapy today for tall girls is rare, its use to conform a childs height to fit social norms may provide valuable insight into the present-day use of growth hormone treatment for healthy boys of short stature, say U-M researchers.

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  • Geriatrics Center clinics moving to East Ann Arbor (10/24/06)
    The University of Michigan Health Systems Geriatrics Center is moving its clinics to the newly renamed East Ann Arbor Health and Geriatrics Center, and will open at the new location Oct. 30.

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  • UMHHC a Top Performer in UHC Quality and Accountability Ranking (10/24/06)
    The University HealthSystem Consortium recognized five of its members who have demonstrated excellence in delivering high-quality, safe, effective and equitable care to their patients. The top performers emerged following the rigorous application of a scoring methodology that considered performance measures in safety, mortality, effectiveness and equity. The methodology was applied to data submitted in 2005 from 81 full UHC members who participate in UHCs Clinical, Core Measures and Operational databases.

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  • Grant allows study of cancer in international populations (10/22/06)
    The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and the School of Public Health have received a $1.2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to train public health students in cancer epidemiology research in special populations. The program will focus on 15 countries in Asia, Africa and South America, as well as minority populations in the United States.

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  • U-M Transplant Center receives HHS Medal of Honor (10/22/06)
    The U-M Health System Transplant Center, in collaboration with Gift of Life Michigan, received the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services distinguished Medal of Honor for achieving an organ donation rate of more than 75 percent for a unprecedented second year in a row, making it one of the leading transplant centers for organ donation in Michigan and one of the best in the country.

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  • Consumer alert: Debit/credit card use in hospital facilities (10/20/06)
    U-M Hospital Security Services and U-M Department of Public Safety are investigating reports of activity that may have involved someone obtaining access to information from debit and credit cards used in University Hospital retail food outlets. The investigation is continuing and we still are gathering information, but we believe it is prudent to notify individuals who may have used their debit cards or credit cards in UH retail food service facilities in the last six months so individuals can take appropriate action.

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  • Brain's pleasure chemical linked to pain, too (10/19/06)
    For years, the brain chemical dopamine has been thought of as the brains pleasure chemical. But now, a new study from the University of Michigan adds a new twist to dopamines fun-loving reputation: pain.

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  • Upjohn Bldg., home to Depression Ctr. & Psychiatry, opens at U-M (10/19/06)
    A stunning new home for research and care aimed at helping people with depression, bipolar disorder and other psychiatric illnesses has opened at the University of Michigan. Home to the U-M Depression Center and many psychiatry programs, it may be the first of its kind in the world.

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  • U-M Trauma Burn Center awards local fire departments' fire prevention programs (10/17/06)
    The University of Michigan Trauma Burn Center today announced the Marquette Fire Department and the Grand Traverse Fire Department as the 2006 recipients of the Leland Gayheart Fire Safety & Prevention Award.

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  • Local celebs to wait tables, raise money to feed homebound (10/16/06)
    To help raise funds and to kick off November as Motor Meals Awareness Month for the City of Ann Arbor, the Plymouth Road Big Boy is hosting a Celebrity Dinner, from 5 9 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 1.

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  • Nov. 15 lecture looks to history for flu response (10/16/06)
    If bird flu or an especially virulent form of annual flu strikes, what can we do to reduce the spread of infection in the first critical weeks and months, while we wait for a vaccine or medications? A U-M expert will look to the history of the 1918-1920 Spanish Flu pandemic for answers in a Nov. 15 lecture at U-M.

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  • U-M recognized as top 5 national performer in the 2006 UHC Quality and Accountability Ranking (10/13/06)
    (Issued 10/13/06 by the University Health System Consortium) The U-M Hospitals & Health Centers has been named one of the top five academic health centers in the United States by the University HealthSystem Consortium, for its excellence in delivering high-quality, safe, effective, and equitable care to patients. The other four are Harvard's Brigham and Womens Hospital, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, the Mayo Clinic, and the Ohio State University Medical Center.

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  • Beliefs about genetics can reinforce prejudice (10/11/06)
    Researchers know there is no scientific evidence for genetic differences between racial groups when it comes to athletic ability, but apparently some of the American public isnt getting the message.

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  • Medical journal editor to talk tough on conflict of interest (10/11/06)
    Catherine DeAngelis, M.D., editor-in-chief at the Journal of the American Medical Association, will deliver the Center for the History of Medicines Horace W. Davenport Lecture in the Medical Humanities at 3 p.m., Friday, Oct. 27, in the MCHC Auditorium, C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital.

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  • U-M Congenital Heart Center hosts 14th annual Save A Heart Celebration (10/11/06)
    A strolling buffet of gourmet food and fine wines will help patients and families when the Michigan Congenital Heart Center at the University of Michigan C. S. Mott Childrens Hospital hosts its 14th annual Save A Heart Celebration of Wine and Food. The event will be held at the Michigan League, 911 N. University in Ann Arbor from 6:30-9 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 10.

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  • U-M conference challenges the politics of health and health care (10/06/06)
    The conference will bring together scholars, research scientists, activists, and medical experts from around the world to offer a thoughtful critique of the ways in which current definitions of health are, in some instances, at odds with human well being

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  • Baskets A Plenty auction raises awareness, funds for local programs for older adults (10/05/06)
    The University of Michigan Health System supports five local programs that enrich the lives of older adults. To help raise funds and awareness for these programs, the Turner Senior Resource Center is hosting the Baskets A Plenty silent auction from 2 5 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 22.

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  • U-M Trauma Burn Center: Watch what you heat (10/05/06)
    As part of the Fire Prevention Week (Oct. 8-14), the University of Michigan Trauma Burn Center has joined forces with area fire departments and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) to raise awareness about the dangers of cooking fires.

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  • U-M Cancer Center director to give talk in Ann Arbor (10/04/06)
    Cancer stem cells are the small number of cancer cells that fuel the growth of new tumor cells. Finding drugs that target and kill these stem cells could dramatically improve cancer treatment. Learn more about cancer stem cells and the promise they hold at a community talk featuring Max Wicha, M.D., director of the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Cancer drug could cause exposed bone in jaw (10/03/06)
    A type of drug used to strengthen bones when cancer has spread there may be linked to a side effect that involves deterioration of the jaw bone, according to two new reviews of cancer literature. The condition, called osteonecrosis of the jaw, is marked by exposed bone in the jaw and can lead to infection, inflammation and pain.

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  • Mott partners with Saline Schools for International Walk to School Day (10/03/06)
    The University of Michigan C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital Pediatric Trauma Program, along with Safe Kids of Washtenaw County, has partnered with the Saline Safe Routes 2 School Committee for International Walk to School Day on Wednesday, Oct. 4. The group worked to create safer routes for walking and bicycling for students in Saline.

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  • Auto pioneer's suicide inspires research on bipolar disorder (10/02/06)
    video  Five years ago, the automotive industry was shocked by the suicide of one of its brightest stars, Heinz Prechter. Today, the tragedy of his death is driving scientists at the U-M Health System and elsewhere to perform research that should give hope to the 5.7 million Americans who have bipolar disorder.

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  • How low should we go with LDL cholesterol? (10/02/06)
    Americans have been trying to get their cholesterol levels down for decades, and in recent years, experts have suggested that some people should aim even lower. Not so fast, says a team of researchers from the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and the University of Michigan Health System in a new paper.

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  • New U-M program focuses on brain, nerve problems in athletes (10/02/06)
    video  Athletes are more prone than others to a lot of brain and nerve problems. Thats why the U-M Health System launched a unique new program for competitive athletes that focuses on injuries and illnesses affecting the brain and nerves. Called Michigan NeuroSport, it helps athletes get fast diagnosis and treatment, without running afoul of performance-enhancing drug guidelines.

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  • Oct. 6 groundbreaking for new children's, women's hospitals (10/02/06)
    On Friday, Oct. 6, the U-M Health System plans to break ground for the new 1.1 million square-foot C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital and Womens Hospital facility. It will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the courtyard between University Hospital and C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital. A formal groundbreaking ceremony will begin at 4 p.m. on the Terrace parking lot, site of the new childrens and womens building on the U-M Medical Campus. Both events are open to the public.

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  • The link between breast cancer and osteoporosis (10/02/06)
    video  Powerful chemotherapy drugs and estrogen-blocking hormone treatments are highly effective in treating breast cancer. But in the process they may be putting women at risk of another disease: osteoporosis.

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  • U-M expert offers tips for picking safe Halloween costumes (10/02/06)
    video  While Halloween is one of the most exciting times of the year, it also can be one of the most dangerous. To keep kids safe, a U-M expert encourages parents to dress their children in Halloween costumes that are safe, and offers tips for picking the right costume.

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  • Why don't all moles progress to melanoma? (10/02/06)
    video  Thirty percent of all melanomas begin in a mole and 90 percent of moles contain cancer-causing mutations. Until now, scientists didnt know how skin cells stop these mutations from triggering the development of cancer. Maria S. Soengas, Ph.D., and other U-M scientists have found the answer in an unexpected place - a structure inside cells called the endoplasmic reticulum.

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September 2006

  • Many urinary stones can be treated without surgery (09/29/06)
    For many patients with urinary stone disease, treatment with a calcium-channel blocker or an alpha blocker can greatly improve their likelihood of passing their urinary stones, which may help these patients avoid surgery, according to an analysis by the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • Molecular scissors help cancer cells break out and spread (09/29/06)
    A University of Michigan research team has identified how cancer cells employ a sort of molecular scissors to cut their way out of tumors and begin spreading throughout the body.

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  • Michigan Visiting Nurses announces flu shot clinics (09/28/06)
    Michigan Visiting Nurses will offer flu clinics to the public at numerous locations throughout October. Medicare B, M-Care, CareChoices and HAP cover the cost of the shots.

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  • Oct. 6 event: Insurance for all (09/28/06)
    Several states, including Michigan, have launched or are about to launch programs that aim to greatly increase the number of people with health insurance. An Oct. 6 event at UMHS will explore some of these plans, and their implications for the proposed Michigan plan.

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  • General Mills CEO to discuss children's health, corporate responsibility on Oct. 5 (09/27/06)
    General Mills Chairman and CEO Stephen W. Sanger, MBA, will present the inaugural Susan B. Meister Lecture in Child Health Policy from 4:30 to 6 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 5, in the University of Michigan Biomedical Science Research Building auditorium.

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  • 16 common myths about breast cancer (09/25/06)
    Breast cancer specialists say misconceptions often cause women more anxiety than necessary. And in some cases the fear paralyzes women and prevents them from seeking the care that could lead to successful treatment. Here, experts debunk some of the most common myths about breast cancer.

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  • U-M Regents approve M-CARE sale (09/22/06)
    The University of Michigan Board of Regents today approved the sale of the Universitys M-CARE health plan to Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and its subsidiary, Blue Care Network of Michigan. (Joint press release from UMHS and BCBSM)

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  • Blacks with bladder cancer have worse survival (09/21/06)
    Black patients with bladder cancer are 35 percent more likely to die of the disease than white patients, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center

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  • U-M study suggests vitamin K deficiency as an osteoporosis risk factor (09/21/06)
    A new study by Jane Lukacs of the University of Michigan School of Nursing suggests that the impairment of vitamin K function could compromise bone health and contribute to the development of osteoporosis. The study found that one of the early effects of declining estrogen is the impairment of vitamin K function in bone even before any bone loss that could be attributed to menopause can be measured.

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  • More kidney cancer detected early, yet death rate rises (09/19/06)
    The number of cases of kidney cancer has been rising over the last two decades, and new research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center shows that this increase is driven largely by the detection of small, presumably curable, kidney masses. But even though the rising incidence has been paralleled by greater use of surgery for kidney cancer, this trend has not led to fewer people dying. .

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  • Annual flu shot may protect cardiovascular disease patients (09/19/06)
    The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology are asking heart doctors to do something they may not normally do - give flu shots to their patients. However, patients with cardiovascular disease should not get the nasal-spray flu vaccine.

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  • Ground broken for new eye/diabetes building (09/19/06)
    UMHS is embarking on the construction of a $121 million, 222,000 square-foot building that will more than double its capacity for eye care, research and education, and will give U-M scientists more space to search for a cure for Type 1 diabetes.

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  • U-M student overcomes crippling disorder with a double lung transplant (09/19/06)
    Transplant Center celebrating anniversary and want to remind the public about the groundbreaking work U-M has accomplished in this field. They also would like the occasion to remind people about the importance of organ donation in saving the lives of others.

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  • Lights, camera, action: Live webcast of surgery on Sept. 20 (09/18/06)
    A live webcast from an operating room at the University of Michigan Hospital will highlight an innovative use of technology in medical care: a surgical robot that assists surgeons as they perform a minimally invasive procedure, in this case a robot-assisted hysterectomy. The webcast is from 3-4 p.m. EDTSept. 20 at www.or-live.com.

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  • Sept. 30 Vita Redita to benefit Transplant Center (09/18/06)
    The U-M Transplant Center will host the Vita Redita (Life Restored) Gala Auction and Dinner on Saturday, Sept. 30. The event will take place at 6 p.m. at the Polo Fields Golf and Country Club in Ann Arbor. Proceeds from the Vita Redita event will support the Transplant Centers research, organ donation initiatives, and Camp Michitanki.

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  • Muscle pathology is key to nerve cell death (09/15/06)
    Healing damaged muscle could be critical to preventing the death of nerve cells in patients with Kennedy disease and other incurable neuromuscular disorders, such has ALS or Lou Gehrigs disease, according to a new research study from the University of Michigan Medical School.

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  • Existing vaccine facilities can handle flu pandemic (09/14/06)
    The most cost effective and quickest way to respond to a flu pandemic within the next five years is to use existing facilities to make vaccines from cell cultures, new research suggests.

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  • Bath falls common among older adults (09/13/06)
    Getting in and out of the bathtub or shower can be a perilous journey for older adults, even when they have bathrooms already equipped with safety features, according to research by the University of Michigan Health System. But many of these problems can be fixed with the use of proper features and education about how to use them.

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  • Residents and faculty pinpoint priorities in ethics education (09/12/06)
    There is no shortage of opinions on what physicians in training need to learn in ethics and professionalism; what has been lacking is data. At U-M, researchers asked residents, faculty, ethic committee members and practicing physicians what residents need to learn to practice medicine ethically.

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  • UMHS in talks with Blue Cross Blue Shield to sell M-CARE (09/12/06)
    Twenty years after launching M-CARE to provide innovative and high-quality health plans to the community on a non-profit basis, UMHS is in final talks to sell M-CARE to an organization that will uphold that tradition despite turbulent times for health plan providers: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and its subsidiary, Blue Care Network of Michigan.

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  • Kids with asthma not getting recommended flu shot (09/11/06)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital say many children with asthma - who are at an increased risk for influenza-related complications - arent getting immunized against the flu, even when they visit their doctor during flu season.

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  • New switch found for turning off a tumor signal (09/08/06)
    The discovery of new cellular machinery leading to tumor cell growth in colorectal cancers points to a possible treatment.

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  • U-M Regent David Brandon gives $4 million to The Michigan Difference (09/08/06)
    University of Michigan Regent and Domino's Pizza CEO and Chairman David Brandon, and his wife Jan, have made a gift of $4 million to the University. The largest portion of the gift will support the hospital facility that pulled his newborn sons through a life-threatening ailment in 1980.

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  • Older stem cells dont just wear out, they actively shut themselves down (09/07/06)
    The natural consequences of growing old include slower wound-healing and a brain that makes fewer new neurons because old tissues have less regenerative capacity. What has not been clear is why. A trio of papers published on-line Sept. 6 in the journal Nature shows that old stem cells dont simply wear out, they actively shut themselves down, probably as a defense against becoming cancerous from genetic defects that accumulate with age.

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  • U-M Cancer Center gets $26.6 million grant from NCI (09/06/06)
    The National Cancer Institute has awarded the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center a grant worth $26.6 million over five years. At the same time, the centers designation as a comprehensive cancer center was renewed.

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  • U-M launches new website on 1918 flu pandemic (09/06/06)
    Amidst the public health chaos of the 1918-1920 influenza epidemic, some U.S. communities experienced low morbidity and mortality rates. The Center for the History of Medicine compiled thousands of pages of primary and secondary source materials on seven such communities. The original documents are now on-line and freely available to researchers.

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  • Deadly disease that scars lungs sends patients on Quest for Breath (09/05/06)
    video  An estimated 200,000 to 300,000 people in the U.S. may be living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a progressive scarring of the lungs in which lung function declines. While there currently is no cure, new research at the U-M Health System, supported by an initiative called Quest for Breath, may bring hope in the future.

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  • Fight back against inherited sudden-death heart condition (09/05/06)
    video  A combination of better diagnosis, treatment and genetic testing is starting to help people fight back against hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, an inherited condition that has the potential to cause sudden cardiac death. Now, people who have a family history of HCM can get a clearer picture of the risks that they and their children face. And, U-M experts say, that can help shape both treatment and preventive steps.

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  • Rotavirus: Messy diapers may be sign of severe intestinal infection (09/05/06)
    video  While mild bouts of diarrhea arent uncommon in young children, moderate to severe diarrhea, lasting several days could be a sign a dangerous infection in the intestines known as rotavirus gastroenteritis. A U-M expert explains how parents can help prevent the spread of rotavirus, and care for their child through unpleasant episodes.

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  • What you feed your baby now may impact his waistline later (09/05/06)
    video  U-M researchers say that feeding your baby and toddler foods made with real fruits and vegetables, instead of sweets, early in life could be the key to controlling their waistline as they grow through childhood and into adulthood.

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August 2006

  • $2M gift to Depression Ctr will fund professorship & research (08/30/06)
    An Ann Arbor businessman who watched his wife struggle with depression has given $2 million to support the research of a University of Michigan Depression Center scientist whose work may help explain the diseases roots in the brain. The gift adds to the $2 million previously given by the same donor for a new building that will open this fall to house the Center and other U-M mental health programs.

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  • Kids Burn Camp fundraising event on Sept. 24 (08/30/06)
    The Chili Cook-off and Family Fun Day to benefit Kids Burn Camp will be held from noon to 3 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 24 at YMCA Camp Manitou-Lin in Middleville, Mich.

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  • Non-coding DNA may cause multi-gene macular degeneration (08/30/06)
    Following reports a year ago on a gene variant strongly linked to age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a team of University of Michigan scientists has identified 20 variants of the same gene that show an even stronger association with the disease.

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  • Rising health expenses a good value (08/30/06)
    Despite dramatic increases in health expenses since 1960, the return on medical spending is high, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard and UMHS. They conclude that between 1960 and 2000, healthcare in America was cost-effective on the whole, although ballooning costs for the elderly are a cause for concern.

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  • Cells can cooperate to produce cancer (08/28/06)
    If two nearby pre-cancerous cells work together, they have a better chance of surviving and becoming cancer, according to a new University of Michigan theory.

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  • PSA predicts prostate cancer treatment success (08/24/06)
    A test used to detect prostate cancer can also help doctors know when treatment is working. A mans prostate specific antigen, or PSA, level after seven months of hormone therapy for advanced prostate cancer predicted how long he would survive, according to a new multicenter study.

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  • Study: Does a surgeon's age matter? (08/24/06)
    Researchers at the U-M Health System say patients should be less concerned about the age of their surgeon and more focused on a number that really counts - how many times a surgeon has performed a particular procedure. Their study showed that surgeons older than 60 with low surgical volumes had higher patient mortality rates than their younger counterparts, while younger surgeons had similar outcomes to their older, more experience peers.

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  • U-M study: Dont judge a surgeon by his or her age (08/24/06)
    Low volume surgeons older than 60 had higher mortality rates with certain complex procedures; younger surgeon mortality rates comparable to peers ages 41- 50

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  • UMMS Professor receives campus technology innovator award (08/24/06)
    Jonathan Maybaum, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology and associate professor of radiation oncology at UMMS received a 2006 CAMPUS TECHNOLOGY Innovator award from CAMPUS TECHNOLOGY magazine. His award was given for providing a user-friendly Web site building tool, SiteMaker.

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  • Sept. 10 U-M fundraiser run/walk for diabetes research (08/22/06)
    The fight against diabetes is a marathon struggle to understand and prevent damage caused by high blood sugar. On Sunday, Sept. 10, champion marathoner Bill Rodgers will join hundreds of runners and walkers at U-M to raise money for research on nerve damage caused by diabetes.

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  • Study looks at death risk and ethnic differences in stroke survivors who have a second stroke (08/22/06)
    Having a stroke is bad enough. But having another one after surviving the first one is especially bad, more than doubling a persons risk of dying in the next two years, a new U-M study finds. And Mexican-Americans are more likely than non-Latinos to suffer a second stroke.

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  • Medical School appoints Edward Hurvitz as department chair (08/16/06)
    The University of Michigan Medical School has announced the appointment of Edward A. Hurvitz, M.D., associate professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation, as chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, pending approval by the U-M Board of Regents.

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  • Stroke costs predicted to top $2.2 trillion (08/16/06)
    Unless Americans do more to lower their risk of stroke and improve stroke care, the nation will pay $2.2 trillion over the next 45 years to care for people who suffer the most common form of stroke, a new University of Michigan Stroke Program study predicts.

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  • Some prostate cancer patients overtreated (08/15/06)
    More than half of men with lower-risk prostate cancer received surgery or radiation treatment when a wait-and-see approach of no therapy and active surveillance would have been a reasonable option, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • 2/3 of depressed pregnant women go untreated (08/14/06)
    The majority of pregnant women who have full-blown major depression arent getting any treatment for the condition, and neither are most pregnant women who have signs of milder depression or depression risk, a new University of Michigan Depression Center study finds.

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  • U-M Compliance Officer appointed to State Health IT Commission (08/14/06)
    Jeanne Strickland, chief compliance officer/privacy director and chief information security officer at UMHS is one of 13 Michigan health professionals named to the newly created State Health Information Technology Commission.

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  • U-M to hold nanotechnology symposium in September (08/09/06)
    The Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences (M-NIMBS) will host a symposium on nanotechnology in science and society on Friday and Saturday, Sept. 8 and 9. The Friday sessions require registration at: www.nano.med.umich.edu. The Saturday morning session is free and open to the public.

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  • "Mom, don't make me go back to school!" (08/07/06)
    video  Does your child already have the back-to-school butterflies? Some important tips from experts at the University of Michigan Health System can help ease fears and anxiety for children of all ages before the school year begins.

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  • College students need to take charge of their health care (08/07/06)
    video  When kids leave home for college, theyll need to learn to do more for themselves like cooking, doing the laundry and finding their way around campus. Theyll also need to become an independent health care consumer. To help, a U-M Health System expert offers college students some health tips to think about as they pack-up and move into college life.

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  • Common childhood sports injury can lead to early onset of arthritis (08/07/06)
    video  An ACL injury early in life could mean the onset of arthritis at a very young age. Researchers at the U-M Health System are hoping to identify the first signs of degenerative arthritis in young knees, to allow for early medical intervention and to slow progression of the disease.

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  • The A-B-Zzzs of healthy back-to-school sleep habits (08/07/06)
    video  While some children transition rather quickly into a back-to-school sleep schedule, others may struggle with new bed times and wake-up times. A U-M expert explains how parents can help ease their children into a routine sleep schedule so theyll be well-rested and ready to learn at school.

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  • U-M professors nanotechnology company secures $30 million investment (08/07/06)
    NanoBio Corporation, a company founded by Dr. James R. Baker, Jr., the Ruth Dow Doan Professor of Biologic Nanotechnology at the University of Michigan, has secured $30 million in funding from Perseus, L.L.C., a leading private equity fund management company headquartered in Washington, D.C.

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  • UMHS, Hopkins team up to accelerate hunt for bipolar genes (08/07/06)
    The search for the genetic underpinnings of bipolar disorder is accelerating with a new effort by scientists at the U-M Depression Center and Johns Hopkins University, funded by a donor who lost her husband to suicide after a lifelong battle with bipolar.

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  • Aug. 12: Second Chance at Life event (08/02/06)
    On Aug. 12, the University of Michigan Transplant Center will host the sixth annual Second Chance at Life Fun Walk/5K Run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hines Park in Westland.

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  • Estrogen probably not the only factor in menopausal bone loss (08/01/06)
    The loss of bone density after menopause has long been linked to the dramatic decrease in the estrogen hormone, estradiol. But a series of studies that has carefully tracked hormone levels and bone density in women aged 40 to 55 over the course of a decade has found that estrogen may not be the only hormone that should be considered.

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July 2006

  • Local developers' gift supports new hospital, pediatric bone marrow research (07/26/06)
    Local developer Strathmore Development Company has given the University of Michigan Health System a $100,000 gift to support the new C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and Women's Hospital facility, as well as pediatric bone marrow research.

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  • New findings on genetics of OCD (07/26/06)
    Obsessive-compulsive disorder tends to run in families. Now, new U-M research is shedding new light on one of the genetic factors that may contribute to that pattern. And while no one gene causes OCD, the research is helping scientists confirm the importance of a particular gene that has been suspected to play a major role in OCDs development.

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  • How can identical twins be genetically different? (07/25/06)
    U-M researchers have discovered three genes that are over-expressed in rheumatoid arthritis, or RA, that were not known to be associated with the disease before. They also found that non-genetic factors influenced the expression of these genes and that the expression patterns varied between identical twins where only one twin had RA.

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  • U-M Hospitals and Health Centers end 2006 with 5.5% operating margin (07/21/06)
    The University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers has finished its 10th straight fiscal year in the black and has completed its fifth consecutive year of increasing its operating margin, a sign of the medical center's strong financial health as it prepares for an increasingly difficult health care finance environment. A positive operating margin is essential to fund continued advances in patient care, education, research, and the facilities needed to support these functions.

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  • Bubbles go high-tech to fight tumors (07/20/06)
    Youve bathed in them, popped them, endured bad song lyrics about them. Now, University of Michigan researchers hope to add a more sophisticated application to the listgas bubbles used like corks to block oxygen flow to tumors, or to deliver drugs.

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  • Scientists coax nerve fibers to re-grow after spinal cord injury (07/18/06)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School and Johns Hopkins University have developed a treatment that helps animals with traumatic spinal cord injuries grow new nerve fibers.

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  • Lichter to leave Medical School for ASCO (07/13/06)
    Allen S. Lichter, M.D., dean of the University of Michigan Medical School and the Newman Family Professor of Radiation Oncology, has announced he will be stepping down as dean on July 31, leaving the U-M faculty on Sept. 30. Effective late October, he will become Executive Vice-President and Chief Executive Officer of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, which is based in Alexandria, Va.

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  • Carmen R. Green, M.D., wins fellowship (07/11/06)
    Carmen R. Green, M.D., is one of seven recipients selected for the prestigious Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship for 2006-07. Green has a long-standing interest in health policy and health disparities, particularly in the area of disparities in pain assessment and management among minorities, women and elderly people.

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  • Study shows high survival for patients with torn aortas who get surgery (07/10/06)
    Researchers have published some rare good news about aortic dissection, showing that 90 percent of patients who survive emergency surgery and hospitalization for its most serious form will still be alive three years later.

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  • Women still get lower-quality heart attack care than men, despite hospital improvement efforts (07/10/06)
    Women were less likely than men to benefit from hospitals quality-improvement measures and were less likely to get all of the drugs, tests, and counseling about smoking, diet and exercise that have been proven to help heart attack survivors live longer and healthier lives.

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  • U-M remains one of best hospitals in the country (07/07/06)
    U.S. News & World Report has ranked the U-M Hospitals and Health Centers among the best in the nation. U-M also achieved a ranking in each of the 16 specialties listed by the magazine.

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  • U-M to sponsor Sickle Cell Picnic (07/07/06)
    Children living with sickle cell disease and their families are invited to spend a fun-filled afternoon on August 5 with friends, U of M staff, and a whole lot of hot dogs and cake. The day's events include a clown, talent show, a moonwalk, an obstacle course, and arts and crafts.

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  • Dragon art to be dedicated during July 11 ceremony (07/06/06)
    Its messages contain patients wishes for health, including one that contains a short musical score written from grandfather to granddaughter while in his hospital bed. These often intimate messages of hope decorate more than 1,700 paper fans that have become the scales adorning the Dragon of Wishes Hopes and Dreams.

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  • Selfish genes make humans selfless, new theory suggests (07/06/06)
    Humans are altruistic by nature, according to a new theory published in the current issue of Psychological Inquiry.

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  • Doug Strong named hospital CEO (07/05/06)
    Doug Strong, M.B.A., has been named director and chief executive officer of the University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, pending approval by the U-M Board of Regents, after serving in the post on an interim basis since October 2005.

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  • Brain surgery without the surgery? (07/03/06)
    video  Doctors can do more than ever to find and fix the problems that cause many strokes before a stroke ever happens. And they can do it without ever having to open up the skull. Its brain surgery without the surgery, also called minimally invasive, and according to U-M doctors, its allowing many patients to reduce their risk of a stroke, including those who wouldnt be able to withstand a brain operation.

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  • Inhalants: The new, convenient high for kids and teens (07/03/06)
    video  While the effects of huffing are short-lived, inhalant abuse can carry long-term health consequences and death, even the first time they are used. U-M experts advise that parents discuss the dangers of inhalant abuse with their kids early, before theyre exposed to it in social settings. To help, they offer some suggestions on how and when to talk with kids, as well as tips on how to detect inhalant abuse.

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  • Pregnancy tips: Stay fit and safe when exercising in the summer heat (07/03/06)
    video  Pregnant women dont have to avoid exercise just because its hot outside but they do have to be especially careful to regulate their body temperature and hydration levels, and to take into account their changing bodies. With that in mind, a U-M expert gives some tips to keep moms-to-be working out and healthy through the dog-days of summer.

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  • Study: Catheter option cuts infection for men (07/03/06)
    Its one of the things about a hospital stay that men loathe, and that infectious bacteria love: the urinary catheter. Now, a new U-M/VA study shows that a less-unpleasant option for male hospital patients is also a much safer one.

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  • What you drink may be ruining your diet (07/03/06)
    video  Think youve got your diet under control? You may be gulping down hundreds of unwanted calories each day without even knowing it. To help you make healthier beverage choices from soda and sports drinks to fruit juice and milk and cut back on extra calories, a U-M expert offers tips that will help quench your thirst and keep your diet in check.

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June 2006

  • Minorities report various factors contribute to diabetes-related emotional distress (06/29/06)
    The emotional stress of dealing with diabetes tends to be more severe for Hispanics than African Americans, a new study shows, though psychological aspects are too often ignored for both groups.

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  • U-M experts weigh-in on HPV vaccine recommendations (06/29/06)
    University of Michigan Health System experts are available to discuss today's HPV vaccine recommendations and recent research about HPV vaccines, as well as provide information about cervical cancer, HPV and childhood immunizations.

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  • Health fiesta aimed at Latinos (06/28/06)
    Dia de la Mujer Latina is an interactive health fiesta, a unique cultural intervention focusing on reducing health disparities in the Latino community by providing health education, resources and health screenings. The local event will be from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, July 16, at Ypsilanti High School.

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  • The PICU family photo (06/21/06)
    U-M Health System nurses are honoring children in the pediatric intensive care unit with a Wall of Courage - a mural that includes images of some of the children, of creatures and critters, and of the changing of the seasons.

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  • Is heart rhythm treatment "worth it"? (06/19/06)
    A new procedure that stops the most common form of irregular heartbeat is expensive, but it may pay off in the long run for many patients, new research by a UMHS and VA Ann Arbor team suggests. That means its important for doctors to choose carefully which patients receive catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation, and to perform further research on its long-term benefit.

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  • NIH renews agreement with U-M to study health, retirement (06/19/06)
    The National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health, has renewed its cooperative agreement with U-M to continue the Health and Retirement Study, the nation's leading resource for data on the health and economic conditions of Americans over age 50.

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  • Common IBD surgery triples women's risk of infertility (06/15/06)
    The risk of infertility in women triples after the most common major surgery for the inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis, according to researchers at the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • U-M offers chemotherapy in Canton (06/15/06)
    Cancer treatment is draining enough on its own, without worrying about piling on the miles driving to and from the doctors office to receive chemotherapy drugs. To make that aspect more convenient for some patients and to accommodate growing demand for cancer care, the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center now offers chemotherapy infusion in Canton.

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  • Multi-city parade to kick-off Kids Burn Camp (06/14/06)
    Kids Burn Camp, will host a special parade to kick-off this years camp on Sunday, June 18. Beginning at 11 a.m., young campers will be transported in fire trucks and classic cars from Spectrum Hospitals Blodgett Campus in Grand Rapids to camp Manitou-Lin in Middleville.

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  • New head of geriatric social work named (06/14/06)
    Darlene Racz, a social worker with extensive experience working with seniors, has been named the new associate director of social work and community programs for the University of Michigan Health Systems Geriatrics Center and Turner Geriatric Clinic.

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  • Hope I die before I get old? (06/13/06)
    Back when he was 20, rock star Pete Townshend wrote the line "I hope I die before I get old into a song, My Generation". But a unique new U-M and VA study suggests that Townshend may have fallen victim to a common, and mistaken, belief: That the happiest days of peoples lives occur when theyre young.

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  • Theres no substitute for old-fashioned one-on-one (06/12/06)
    A study posted today and published in this month's issue of American Surgeon has found a crucial element in influencing medical school students to pursue careers in surgery. Even with all the modern day teaching tools, students still rate their experience based on the interactions they've had with their instructors.

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  • U-M diabetes leader wins national award (06/12/06)
    In order to truly confront the nations diabetes epidemic and head off its potentially devastating long-term health and economic effects, America needs to re-think the way it defines and detects the disease, a U-M diabetes expert said this week after receiving a prestigious national award.

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  • U-M Bioethicist wins national honor (06/08/06)
    UMHS bioethicist and psychiatrist Scott Kim, M.D., Ph.D. has been named one of the nation's three Greenwall Faculty Scholars for 2006, an honor that will help support his research into medical decision-making by and for people who have Alzheimer's disease or other impairments.

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  • Breast-sparing surgery with BRCA genes (06/06/06)
    Women diagnosed with breast cancer who carry a certain genetic mutation can have breast-sparing surgery but should consider hormonal treatments to reduce their risk of cancer returning

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  • GCRC receives $30.6 million NIH grant (06/06/06)
    The University of Michigan Health System has been awarded a $30.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund its General Clinical Research Center for five more years. The grant funds specialized facilities, staff and resources that support as many as 200 patient-oriented studies at any given time.

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  • Most children diagnosed with autism at 2 have same diagnosis at age 9 (06/06/06)
    Clinicians are apparently getting better at diagnosing autism in young children. More than 75 percent of children diagnosed with autism at age 2 appear to still have the condition at age 9, according to a report by a University of Michigan autism expert and colleagues from other universities.

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  • U-M celebrates cancer survivors June 11 (06/05/06)
    video  Whether its running a marathon or working in a garden, physical activity is important in the life of any cancer survivor. So get moving and come to the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Centers 12th annual National Cancer Survivors Day event on June 11.

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  • Football event to benefit prostate cancer research (06/05/06)
    The U-M Men's Fantasy Football Experience, a new two-day event championed by Michigan Football Coach Lloyd Carr, will benefit the "Men of Michigan" Prostate Cancer Research Fund.

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  • Fourth of July will sparkle with these tips for a safe celebration (06/05/06)
    video  Each year in the United States, about 10,000 people are injured by fireworks. To help make this Fourth of July sparkle, an expert with the University of Michigan Trauma Burn Center offers tips to enjoy a safe Independence Day and avoid serious injury.

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  • The buzz on treating summer insect stings and bites (06/05/06)
    video  What should you do if your child is stung by a bee, and when should you be concerned about mosquito bites? To take the sting out of summer, a University of Michigan Health System pediatrician offers tips to help treat insect bites and stings, and advice on how to prevent mosquito and tick bites.

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  • Tips to avoid jet lag, drowsy driving during summer travel (06/05/06)
    video  Millions of Americans will take to the roads and the skies for summer travel this year. For many, jet-lag, environmental changes and a change in habits can make getting a good nights sleep a major challenge. Fortunately, theres a lot you can do before and during your trip to help keep those sleep problems from happening.

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  • U-M Trauma Burn receives renewal of burn verification (06/05/06)
    The U-M Trauma Burn Center, part of the Department of Surgerys Division of Acute Care Surgery, has been reverified as a burn center by the American Burn Association and the Committee on Trauma of the American College of Surgeons. This achievement recognizes the burn centers dedication to providing optimal care for its patients. The U-M Trauma Burn Center is the only verified burn center in the state of Michigan.

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  • Writing a roadmap to the future for cancer survivors (06/05/06)
    video  By 2010, an estimated 1 out of every 250 people will be a survivor of childhood cancer. For these survivors, cancer will always be a part of their lives, making it that much more important for them to carefully map out their future care to stay cancer-free.

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  • U-M oncologist awarded (06/02/06)
    Laurence H. Baker, D.O., chairman of the Southwest Oncology Group and professor of Internal Medicine and Pharmacology at the University of Michigan, has received the Sarcoma Foundation of Americas Nobility in Science Award.

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  • Adult children of mothers with mental illness show problems (06/01/06)
    Mothers with serious mental illness report that, for the most part, their children entered adulthood with psychiatric and behavioral problems.

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  • U-M launches clinic for genetic heart condition (06/01/06)
    Some families seem cursed with especially bad heart health, losing members of several generations in sudden, tragic deaths at young ages. But for many of these families, the curse may actually be an inherited genetic disease that makes the heart muscle grow abnormally thick - and increases the risk of sudden cardiac death. Now, the U-M Cardiovascular Center has launched one of only seven clinics in the nation devoted to this condition.

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May 2006

  • Harold F. Falls, Leader in Medical Genetics, Has Died (05/31/06)
    Harold F. Falls, M.D., a U-M ophthalmologist who played an early and influential role in the field of medical genetics, has died at the age of 96. He helped to establish one of the first clinics in the nation focused on genetic diseases, and devoted his long career to building a rich collection of genetic histories of eye disease that are still being studied today.

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  • Need to make a tricky medical decision? Step back, study says (05/31/06)
    If a deadly bird flu reaches America, which would you choose: To get a risky experimental vaccine now, or to forego that risk but face an even greater risk of dying in the epidemic? What would you choose for your child, or your community? A new study probes how we make such tricky decisions, and how our decisions might change dramatically if we step back and put ourselves in the shoes of others.

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  • U-M Geriatrics Center hosts picnic June 24 (05/30/06)
    The popular annual picnic will be held at June 24 at the Turner Senior Resource Center. Participants must RSVP for lunch and transportation by June 16.

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  • Seven-year-old Iraqi girl travels to U-M for heart surgery (05/26/06)
    Cooperation by dozens of people on two continents is making it possible for seven-year-old Kawthir A to travel 6,300 miles from Baghdad, Iraq to Ann Arbor, to have her life-threatening heart condition repaired by the noted team of the Michigan Congenital Heart Center.

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  • UMHS offers 'Happiest Baby' classes (05/24/06)
    The sound of a crying baby can torment new parents and erode their confidence in their abilities to care for the infant. A popular program, Dr. Harvey Karps Happiest Baby course, offers help and guidance to parents. The U-M Health System is offering the class to new and expecting parents; it will be taught by certified instructors from the Health System.

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  • Proteus mirabilis gives up its genetic secrets (05/23/06)
    Scientists now have inside information to use in the fight against Proteus mirabilis - a nasty bacterium that can cause kidney stones, as well as hard-to-treat urinary tract infections.

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  • U-M part of personalized cancer treatment trial (05/23/06)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center will help lead a new study designed to examine whether women with early-stage lymph node-negative breast cancer can be assigned to individualized treatment plans based on certain genes that may predict whether their cancer will return.

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  • U-M scientists target triggers for pulmonary fibrosis (05/23/06)
    Scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School have identified biochemical signals that attract pathogenic cells to damaged lung tissue - one of the first steps in a chain of events leading to a lethal disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or IPF.

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  • Patients need help finding health information (05/22/06)
    Despite the ease and availability of Internet searches, cancer patients looking for information about their disease found more information by seeking help from a librarian than by searching on their own, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Eye/diabetes building design approved (05/19/06)
    The U-M Board of Regents has approved the design for a building that will make the Kellogg Eye Center the largest in the Midwest, and provide a home for the Brehm Center for Type 1 Diabetes Research and Analysis.

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  • Sperm donor transmitted genetic disorder, study finds (05/19/06)
    As medical technology continues to advance, fertility procedures such as in-vitro fertilization and donor insemination are becoming more commonplace. However, a study in the May issue of The Journal of Pediatrics warns that, even after thorough screenings of sperm donors, genetic disorders can be transmitted to the conceived children.

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  • Substance abuse screening may curb risky teen behavior (05/17/06)
    Researchers at the U-M Health System believe one way to help curb risky behavior teenage behavior like drinking and driving is to do drug screening for all hospitalized pediatric trauma patients, and offer brief alcohol and substance abuse intervention programs to those who test positive. Their study, published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery, found nearly 40 percent of the pediatric trauma patients ages 14 to 17 tested positive for substance abuse.

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  • Kids Burn Camp named Kiwanis Governor's Project (05/16/06)
    Kids Burn Camp, a week-long camp for burn injured children supported by the University of Michigan Trauma Burn Center, Spectrum Health and Bronson Hospital, has been designated as the 2006 Governors Project of the Michigan District of Kiwanis International and will receive $27,000 to send 50 kids to camp.

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  • School-based health center program celebrates 10-year anniversary (05/16/06)
    University of Michigan Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools will celebrate 10 years of providing physical and mental health services to children within the Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti public schools through a system of school-based health centers.

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  • June 10: Carr's Wash for Kids event (05/15/06)
    The Wolverine football program will host the third annual Carr's Wash for Kids community event on Saturday, June 10. Head coach Lloyd Carr, members of the coaching staff and players will be out in front of Michigan Stadium washing cars from 12:30 to 2 p.m. Funds raised at this year's event will go to support the Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Unit in the new $523 million children's hospital and women's hospital facility.

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  • WTKA to host 12-hour radio-a-thon to benefit Mott (05/15/06)
    The University of Michigan Football Team is taking over Sports Talk 1050 WTKA in Ann Arbor for a 12-hour Radio-A-Thon on Wednesday, June 7, to raise funds and awareness for the U-M C.S. Mott Children's Hospital's capital campaign. The broadcast will be a prelude to the Carr's Wash for Kids community event.

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  • Will parents accept new HPV vaccines for kids? (05/11/06)
    A new study suggests that many parents may be hesitant to immunize their preadolescent children against HPV once vaccines become available in 2007. Simply providing them with educational materials will not be enough to gain their acceptance, say researchers. They found that parents' attitudes and life experience with HPV were more likely to influence their decision to vaccinate their child that educational materials alone.

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  • William Elger named national chair of business group (05/11/06)
    William R. Elger Jr., CPA, has been appointed national chair of the Association of American Medical Colleges' Group on Business Affairs.

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  • Evolutionary forces explain why women live longer than men (05/09/06)
    Despite research efforts to find modern factors that would explain the different life expectancies of men and women, the gap is actually ancient and universal, according to University of Michigan researchers.

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  • First U-M Atkins professor named (05/08/06)
    A U-M Medical School researcher who studies the science of obesity and metabolism is receiving an honor named for another physician who achieved international prominence in that same field.

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  • U-M scientists find genetic cause of multiple birth defects (05/08/06)
    Friedhelm Hildebrandt, M.D. and his colleagues in the U-M Medical School study genes that, when mutated, produce a lethal kidney disease called nephronophthisis (NPHP) in infants and children. Hildebrandt's research has identified an intriguing connection between all these congenital diseases and tiny hair-like projections on cells, which scientists call cilia.

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  • U-M study provides first look at the birth of a retina cell (05/08/06)
    Scientists at the U-M Kellogg Eye Center have gained new insight into the way an embryonic retina cell develops and then commits itself to a specific role in the eye. They have observed a small window of opportunity during which a cell has been designated to play a particular role, but has not yet begun to function as such.

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  • Medical student wins overseas fellowship (05/05/06)
    Medical student Tanya Wansom has received a Fogarty International Center/Ellison Overseas Fellowship in Global Health and Clinical Research. She will spend a year in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

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  • Breast conservation a good option for 'early' cancer (05/04/06)
    For women diagnosed with a type of non-invasive breast cancer, removing the breast is not the only treatment option. Breast conserving surgery, long known to be successful at treating the more common invasive cancer, can also be effective for this pre-invasive condition.

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  • Mammography recall is cost-effective (05/04/06)
    The hidden costs of achieving a 99.5 percent mammography recall compliance rate is 16 cents per screening patient, according to a recent study administered by researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Patients Have High Expectations About Screening Mammography (05/04/06)
    A substantial proportion of women have beliefs about their personal risk of breast cancer, and expectations about the performance of mammography that are abnormally high or unrealistic, according to a survey conducted at University of Michigan Health Systems.

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  • Story ideas from UMHS for Nurses Week 2006 (05/04/06)
    The University of Michigan Health System is joining with other health care organizations around the country in celebrating the many ways that nurses impact the lives of their patients and coworkers.

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  • Expanding waistlines triggered by your genes (05/03/06)
    A gene that degrades the body's collagen infrastructure has been shown to make fat cells fatter and expand girth.

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  • MVN offers osteoporosis screenings (05/03/06)
    In an effort to educate community members about the importance of bone quality and osteoporosis prevention, the University of Michigan Health Systems Michigan Visiting Nurses is teaming up with Kroger to offer bone mass screenings at Kroger stores in May.

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  • New study finds keys to success for asthma programs (05/03/06)
    Asthma programs that address environmental triggers work best when closely connected to front-line health care providers and local communities, according to an international study of more than 400 asthma programs. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency funded the $700,000, three-year study completed by the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

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  • $7M from local couple for new children's hospital center, emergency medicine (05/02/06)
    Ernest Sorini, and his wife and business partner Kelly Sorini, further their commitment to advancing emergency medicine practices and the care of critically ill and injured children through a $7 million gift to the U-M Health System. As part of the gift, $2 million will fund an endowed professorship in the Medical School, and $5 million will create the Sorini Family Childrens Emergency Medicine Center in the new U-M C.S. Mott Childrens Hospital and Womens Hospital facility.

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  • Dealing with potentially life-threatening allergies (05/01/06)
    video  Peanuts, bee stings and fear: A U-M Health System allergy specialist discusses severe allergic reactions, who may be at risk for this life-threatening event, and what allergy dangers may lurk in the warmth of summer.

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  • Itchy, burning eyes can be sign of dry eye syndrome (05/01/06)
    video  Dry eye syndrome isnt just something that happens during allergy season or when youve slept overnight in your contacts. Its a serious and often painful condition, which affects an estimated 20 percent of the population over age 50, primarily women. And if left untreated, dry eyes can lead to a decrease in vision.

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  • Parents: Get a jump on summer trampoline safety (05/01/06)
    video  Trampolines can be fun, but without proper safety precautions, they can be extremely dangerous for children. A U-M Health System expert offers tips on how parents can get a jump on trampoline safety this summer, and avoid the ups and downs of summertime injury.

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  • Technique shows promise for bladder cancer detection (05/01/06)
    MDCT urography is a promising technique for detecting bladder tumors both with and without contrast material, helping patients avoid an invasive test, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Michigan Health System.

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  • Tips on how to walk your way to better health (05/01/06)
    video  Getting healthy doesnt need to be hard. It may only require a few simple steps. An expert at the University of Michigan Health System offers some tips for starting and maintaining a regular walking program this spring and summer that can improve cardiovascular fitness levels and even help you lose weight.

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April 2006

  • Safe Kids hosts May 13 event on water safety (04/26/06)
    s part of National Safe Kids Week 2006: Safe Pools for Safe Kids (May 6 13), Safe Kids Washtenaw County and the American Red Cross plan to host a special educational event on drowning and entrapment.

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  • Using aspirin to prevent antibiotic-induced hearing loss (04/26/06)
    Irreversible hearing loss is commonly caused by an antibiotic that is widely used in the developing world. Now, researchers at the University of Michigans Kresge Hearing Research Institute have found that the hearing loss can be prevented in many people with the use of another inexpensive, widely available medication: aspirin.

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  • Two gifts to Scleroderma Program total $4.5M (04/25/06)
    Gifts from the Rye and Danto families are made in honor of their families' struggles with the little-understood, often-deadly condition.

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  • U-M unveils innovative diabetes program (04/24/06)
    U-M employees and their dependents who have any form of diabetes will be able to receive some of their medications for free, through an innovative new pilot program aimed at encouraging the use of medicines that can help prevent the disease's worst long-term effects.

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  • Half of older diabetics lack heart/kidney drugs (04/18/06)
    Only 43 percent of older people with diabetes receive medicines that could protect their heart and kidneys, despite the fact that virtually all of them could benefit from those drugs, a new U-M study finds. And even among those with the most to gain from the medicines, because of existing heart or kidney problems, the rate of use barely reaches 53 percent. .

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  • Kellogg Eye Center seeing rise in infections (04/17/06)
    Ophthalmologists at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center have seen an increase in the number of contact lens wearers with a rare fungal eye infection.

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  • Osteoporosis drug prevents breast cancer (04/17/06)
    Initial results of the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene, or STAR, show that the drug raloxifene, currently used to prevent and treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, works as well as tamoxifen in reducing breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women at increased risk of the disease.

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  • Put your best voice forward on World Voice Day (04/14/06)
    Many people strain their vocal cords on a regular basis due to the way they sing or speak. Whether youre a lawyer, teacher, parent or even a star-in-the-making on American Idol, experts at the University of Michigan Health System say its vital to focus on the well-being of your voice.

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  • Binge behavior/addiction linked to stress, tripling desire for sugar (04/13/06)
    Stressed individuals might be particularly prone to binge eating or drug addiction because of high levels of a hormone mechanism in their brain, according to new University of Michigan and Georgetown University research.

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  • Oops! Study looks at brain's response to errors (04/12/06)
    No matter how hard we try, we all make mistakes that arent just annoying, but potentially costly. Now, a team of U-M researchers has looked inside the human brain and captured the instant when someone makes such a mistake. What theyve found is interesting by itself, but may also help scientists understand mental health problems such as obsessive-compulsive disorder.

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  • Transplant physician awarded with Shining Star (04/12/06)
    Secretary of State Terri Lynn Land honors renal transplant physician Alan Leichtman of the University of Michigan Health System with a Shining Star award in recognition of his exemplary leadership in organ and tissue donation.

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  • Is competition pushing our scientists too far? (04/06/06)
    A new study suggests that the competitive nature of research fosters an environment where scientific misbehavior takes place far more often than the misconduct that makes headline news. And because scientific misbehavior involves more mundane decisions and actions, it may be easier for researchers to look the other way.

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  • U.S. falling behind in embryonic stem cell research, study says (04/06/06)
    The fear that United States researchers might lose ground to their international counterparts in human embryonic stem cell research now appears to have become a fact. A study co-authored by researchers at the University of Michigan and the Stanford University School of Medicine documents that stem cell researchers in other countries have begun to out-publish U.S. scientists.

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  • U-M Life Sciences Orchestra to play May 5 (04/06/06)
    A moving symphony, a vibrant violin solo and two brassy fanfares will bring the sixth season of the University of Michigan Life Sciences Orchestra to a close, with a free public concert on Friday, May 5 at 8 p.m. in U-Ms Hill Auditorium.

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  • Michigan team singles out cancer stem cells for attack (04/05/06)
    Close on the heels of the discovery that cancer has its own rejuvenating stem cells, a University of Michigan research team has found a way to distinguish these bad-actors from the normal stem cells that they so closely resemble, and to kill the cancer stem cells without harming the normal stem cells in the same tissue.

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  • Ginger kills ovarian cancer cells (04/04/06)
    Ginger is known to ease nausea and control inflammation. But researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center are investigating a new use for this age-old remedy: treating ovarian cancer.

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  • Interior design pioneer gives $2M to U-M CVC (04/04/06)
    Marvin Danto made his name as a leader in fine furnishings and interior design. Now, thanks to a $2 million gift to the U-M Cardiovascular Center, his name will also be known for helping to build a place where next-generation health care, clinical research and teaching will all happen under one roof.

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  • Boomers: It's not your grandma's hip replacement (04/03/06)
    video  Advancements in hip replacement from the procedure itself to the variety of hip prostheses available and shortened recovery times have more and more baby boomers turning to surgery earlier in life to stay active and better their quality of life.

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  • Kids behave and sleep better after tonsillectomy (04/03/06)
    video   A rigorous new U-M study finds that children who have surgery to remove their tonsils are very likely to behave and sleep better one year later. In fact, about half of the children in the study who were found to have Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder before tonsil surgery no longer met criteria for this diagnosis one year later.

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  • Lifting the veil of sadness after cancer loss (04/03/06)
    video  A unique program at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center is helping to life the veil of sadness for family members grieving the loss of loved ones to cancer. The program extends the continuum of care to help families cope with their grief, either in a group setting or individually.

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  • Researchers win money to develop breath test to detect breast cancer (04/03/06)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan hope to change that by developing a device to test breath for the presence of metabolites associated with breast cancer. The team won a Breast Cancer Research Program Idea award, which funds promising, high-risk, high reward research proposals that could lead to critical advancements in eradicating breast cancer.

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  • Too much TV may put extra pounds on preschoolers (04/03/06)
    video   In a new study, researchers from the University of Michigan Health System have found that preschool-age children who are exposed to more than two hours of TV a day are three times as likely to be overweight than kids who watch two or fewer hours of TV daily.

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  • Wet, mild winter may cause problems for allergy sufferers (04/03/06)
    video  Soon millions will experience the runny nose, watery eyes and other symptoms of spring allergies. Because of the wet and relatively mild winter this winter throughout most of the country, U-M experts warn that mold and other spring allergies could be especially bad this year.

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  • Women: Be alert to benign abnormalities of the breast (04/03/06)
    video  Each year, thousands of women will be diagnosed with benign breast abnormalities. While these lumps may be benign, U-M experts say they can sometimes put women at higher risk for breast cancer.

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March 2006

  • Medical School again ranks as one of nations best (03/31/06)
    The University of Michigan Medical School has been ranked No. 11 among the nations 125 fully accredited medical schools, according to the annual Best Graduate Schools rankings released today by U.S. News & World Report.

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  • Kickin It teaches kids the dangers of tobacco use (03/29/06)
    More than 2,000 kids become addicted to nicotine every day, and one in three will die prematurely as a direct result of tobacco use. To raise youngsters awareness of the dangers of tobacco use and help them avoid the lure of tobacco marketing campaigns, the University of Michigan Tobacco Consultation Service, part of the MFit Health Promotion Division, will host Kickin It, an event that combines soccer instruction with tobacco education activities for youngsters in grades 1 through 8.

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  • Moving in the "Sixth Sense" (03/29/06)
    One of our first science lessons included learning the five senses: touch, sight, smell, hearing and taste. The "sixth sense," not the E.S.P. kind, but the kind that researchers study, is called proprioception. Proprioception allows you to touch your nose with your eyes closed. It is the sense of where your body is in space. Proprioception helps you balance and how to put one foot in front of the other to walk without looking at your feet.

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  • Delay in bladder surgery decreases survival (03/28/06)
    Bladder cancer patients whose surgery was delayed for more than three months after their diagnosis were more likely to die from their disease than patients whose surgery was performed sooner.

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  • Medical Schools must get down to business (03/27/06)
    Medical School leaders nationally must manage their institutions more like a business. The U-M Medical School is leading the way.

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  • Trauma Burn Center receives Level 1 verification (03/27/06)
    The University of Michigan Trauma Burn Center has been reverified as a Level 1 Trauma Center by the Commitee on Trauma. These achievements recognize the trauma and burn centers dedication to providing optimal care for injured patients.

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  • What are stem cells, exactly? U-M responds (03/23/06)
    The University of Michigan is helping people sort out the science, ethics and emotions of the stem cell controversy with a new Web siteLife Sciences at Michigan.

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  • Program to boost elderly flu vaccination could save lives (03/22/06)
    Results from a U-M Health System study hold the promise to cost-effectively boost flu immunization rates among the elderly, and ultimately save lives. The study shows that if the federal government were to adopt an intense, 10-year direct-to-consumer advertising campaign - similar to those used by pharmaceutical companies to promote their products - it could significantly increase flu vaccination rates among the elderly and save more than 6,500 lives.

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  • Study shows value of a medical imaging "safety net" (03/22/06)
    A new U-M/VA study reveals that patients sometimes "fall through the cracks" in the system by which medical-imaging specialists send information to patients' own doctors. But the study also shows how a computerized safety-net system can keep this from happening - a system that could be put in place at other hospitals.

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  • Genetics Center will bridge gap between science and medicine (03/20/06)
    Research advances in genetics have the potential to transform the practice of medicine. But to make this happen, laboratory scientists and clinical researchers must work together to make the difficult transition from scientific discovery to clinical practice. To facilitate that transition, the U-M Medical School has created the Center for Genetics in Health and Medicine (CGHM).

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  • Student blogs tell it like it is (03/20/06)
    Twelve medical students are now publishing Web journals (called blogs, short for Web logs) on the U-M Medical Schools Dose of Reality website to tell the world what its like to go to school here.

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  • RAND Study finds all socio-demographic groups at risk for poor quality health care (03/16/06)
    RAND STUDY - Virtually every person in the United States is at risk of failing to receive needed care regardless of race, gender, income or insurance status, according to a RAND Corporation study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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  • Register now for U-Ms Womens Football Academy (03/15/06)
    The Womens Football Academy, an annual fund raiser for the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center, is a day of learning and playing football with U-M coaches and staff. A limited number of spots are still available to register for the highly popular event, which will be held Saturday, June 17.

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  • U-M scientists find psoriasis gene (03/15/06)
    University of Michigan scientists have found a common genetic variation in an immune system gene that makes people much more likely to develop psoriasis - a disfiguring inflammatory skin disease.

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  • Early BP treatment may postpone hypertension (03/14/06)
    A new study led by a U-M doctor offers intriguing insight into the possibility of postponing hypertension among the 59 million Americans whose blood pressure is slightly high. If confirmed, the concept may offer a chance to keep many people from facing the high risk of heart disease and stroke that currently confronts the 65 million Americans with hypertension.

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  • U-M launches new Center for Computational Medicine and Biology (03/14/06)
    To expedite interdisciplinary research breakthroughs, the U-M Medical School is providing $2.0 million in initial funding to establish a new Center for Computational Medicine and Biology. The center's mission is to support and enhance collaborations that link biomedical research with bioinformatics, engineering and computational science resources across the university.

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  • Could a simple heart test save Medicare $$$? (03/13/06)
    Soon, the Medicare agency will announce whether it will cover the cost of a $400 heart test that assesses a persons risk of dying suddenly from a heart condition. Now, a study led by U-M researchers suggests that the test could actually save Medicare hundreds of millions of dollars in the long run.

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  • Diabetics: Control your sugar now, have healthy feet later (03/13/06)
    People with diabetes who keep their blood sugar in check today will probably have a far lower chance of developing foot pain or other nerve damage tomorrow, according to new research results from a national study led by U-M researchers.

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  • Study finds local TV news covers health a lot, but not always well (03/08/06)
    Local television newscasts, where most Americans get most of their news, are packed with medical stories and health information. But the first-ever national study of that coverage finds many problems with it, and sees room for improvement by both TV stations and the health experts whose work fills the news.

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  • 7 things you should know about colon cancer (03/07/06)
    Colon cancer screening is essential to preventing this second most deadly cancer. It's not enough to look out for symptoms. If you start experiencing signs of colon cancer, the disease is likely to be advanced. Here, in time for Colon Cancer Awareness Month, experts share what you need to know about colon cancer.

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  • Internet enhances doctor-patient interaction (03/07/06)
    As more people turn to the Internet for health information, doctors can use it to improve the quality of office visits. But doctors and their patients should be aware of the advantages and potential pitfalls of communicating with each other online.

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  • Cost for growth hormone therapy may not measure up (03/06/06)
    A new study from researchers at U-M Health System revealed that the incremental cost-effectiveness of growth hormone therapy for children with Idiopathic Short Stature was more than $52,000 per inch. In all, it would cost about $40 billion dollars to treat the estimated 400,000 American children ages 4 to 15 who are now eligible for growth hormone therapy.

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  • Probiotic microbes could be a key to good health (03/06/06)
    video  One of the keys to good health could be living in our guts. Researchers are finding that good bacteria living in our digestive tracks, known as probiotic bacteria, helps to not only stimulate digestive health, but also a healthy immune system. And it may even be a key to understanding obesity.

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  • Restless legs sending your partner to the other room? (03/06/06)
    video  About 1 in 10 Americans suffer from restless leg syndrome, a common, yet under-diagnosed neurological disorder characterized by uncontrollable, often painful urges to kick and thrash the legs when trying to fall asleep. Fortunately experts at U-M say there are several ways to reduce the symptoms of RLS to help you and your bed partner get a better nights sleep.

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  • Should heart attack care be more like trauma care? (03/06/06)
    In a heart attack, every minute counts. But should patients spend a few more of those minutes getting to a hospital that can provide the most advanced treatment, rather than just the closest hospital? A new study by U-M and Yale researchers looks at this issue.

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  • Should you get a high-tech snapshot of your heart? (03/06/06)
    video  New high-tech heart scanners can take high-speed snapshots of the heart and look for potential problems. Experts agree that this new technology, called 64-slice CT scanning, is poised to revolutionize heart care. So, should you get your heart checked out this way? It depends on who you are, say U-M Cardiovascular Center experts

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  • Too much of a good thing: Expert warns of overuse of over-the-counter pain medication (03/06/06)
    video  Acetaminophen is generally a safe and effective medication, one that is used by millions of people every day to treat minor aches and pains and to diminish fevers. It might surprise many people, then, that overdoses of Tylenol and other products containing acetaminophen account for a staggering 40 percent to 50 percent of all acute liver failure cases each year in the United States.

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  • Procedure for irregular heartbeat yields long-lasting relief, study shows (03/01/06)
    People who have endured the symptoms and risks of an irregular heartbeat for years can get long-lasting relief from a procedure that takes less than two hours, a definitive new study shows. In all, 74 percent of people with the chronic form of the most common heart-rhythm disorder, atrial fibrillation, were restored to normal rhythm.

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February 2006

  • Outing the barriers to health care for LGBT patients (02/28/06)
    To raise awareness of the specific health needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender patients, the University of Michigan Medical School student group, Bisexuals, Gays, Lesbians and Allies in Medicine, has coordinated a series of events beginning Monday, March 6, that will coincide with National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Health Awareness Week.

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  • Preserving hearing with ear tumor removal (02/28/06)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School have found high rates of success at preserving patients hearing when a particular type of procedure is used to remove tumors on the nerves that connect the brain to the ear.

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  • High death rate for women after heart surgery may be due to infection (02/27/06)
    For years, experts have puzzled over the fact that women who have heart bypass surgery are far more likely than their male counterparts to die within days or weeks of their operation. Now, a new University of Michigan study suggests that the answer to the mystery may lie with infections.

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  • Free car seat inspections March 11 (02/23/06)
    Safe Kids Washtenaw County is hosting a free car seat inspection from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 11 in Ypsilanti.

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  • Obesity may affect response to asthma medications (02/22/06)
    A new study suggests that people who are overweight or obese may have better results with the prescription pill sold as Singulair, while leaner people may have better luck with an inhaled steroid. The findings are the first to suggest that obesity might be a factor that influences how well asthmatics respond to particular asthma medications.

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  • Researcher looks for more targeted way to deliver cancer drugs (02/22/06)
    The future of drug design lies in finding ways to target a drug specifically to a diseased cell, or even a molecule within that cell, while leaving healthy cells and molecules unharmed.

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  • Does your hospital or health plan provide board certified pediatricians? (02/21/06)
    Most parents assume that their child's pediatrician is board certified, but results from two U-M studies appearing the Feb. 22 issue of JAMA show that many pediatricians practicing at hospitals or associated with health plans may, in fact, not be certified or may not have taken the proper steps for recertification.

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  • Cost of strokes in Hispanics predicted to skyrocket (02/17/06)
    Between now and the year 2050, ischemic strokes in Hispanic Americans will cost an estimated $357 billion, according to research presented today at the International Stroke Conference by a team of U-M Stroke Program researchers. The costs include initial hospitalization, ongoing care and lost wages.

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  • Protein predicts complication after marrow transplant (02/17/06)
    Researchers could determine one week after a bone marrow transplant which patients were likely to develop a serious and deadly complication, making them candidates for preventive treatment before any symptoms occur.

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  • UMHS unveils design for new children's, women's hospital (02/17/06)
    Today, the U-M Board of Regents approved the schematic design for the new U-M C.S. Mott Childrens and Womens Hospital, which will replace the existing childrens and womens hospitals. UMHS also received approval for the revised project scope from 1 million square feet to 1.1 million square feet as well as a budget of $523 million to support incremental space for an optimal operation layout, and to accomplish Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification.

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  • Kids improve grades on stroke recognition through U-M program (02/16/06)
    (Issued 2/16 by American Stroke Association) The key to getting more emergency treatment for stroke patients may lie with children, researchers from the U-M Stroke Program report. Initial results from a pilot program shows that it increases the intention of children to call 9-1-1 if they see someone having a stroke.

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  • College depression conference focuses on disasters (02/15/06)
    In recent years, colleges have grappled with the mental aftermath of crises ranging from Hurrican Katrina and the 9/11 attacks to suicides and dorm fires. On March 21-22, faculty, staff and students from colleges around the country will gather to discuss mental health preparation and response in a conference sponsored by the U-M Depression Center.

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  • University Hospital, Taubman Center celebrate 20th anniversary (02/14/06)
    Feb.14 marks the beginning of a new era in health care at the University of Michigan and the opening of the University Hospital and A. Alfred Taubman Health Care Center. Biotechnology was revving up, and medical science was becoming ever more complicated. In the two decades since, UMHS has continued to evolve, expanding its facilities and services to meet the surging demand for its nationally recognized medical care, research and education.

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  • Study finds room for improvement in angioplasty (02/13/06)
    Each year, more than 600,000 Americans have angioplasty procedures to open clogged arteries near their hearts, and treat or prevent a heart attack. But a new study led by U-M Cardiovascular Center researchers shows that the quality and risk of their treatment can vary widely depending on where they go - and demonstrates how it could be improved.

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  • Cancer Center names new research director (02/10/06)
    The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center has appointed Moshe Talpaz, M.D., as associate director for translational research. Talpaz, who joined the U-M team this month, will lead an effort to increase key translational research at the Cancer Center

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  • Kidney cancer patients may be overtreated (02/09/06)
    A less aggressive type of surgery designed to spare healthy organ tissue is used infrequently to treat early-stage kidney cancer, according to researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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  • Liver protein may be linked to coronary artery disease (02/09/06)
    Scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School have identified a liver protein that triggers an inflammatory response in the liver and also may be involved in the development of coronary artery disease.

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  • U-M expert to lead national nursing home study (02/09/06)
    Brant E. Fries, Ph.D. - an innovator in the assessment of nursing home residents - has been selected to help lead a federal study that will gauge the resources used to care for various residents of nursing facilities. Fries says the study will lead to a more equitable division of payments to nursing homes, based on the number of residents at the different ends of the cost spectrum. If a large number of patients at a nursing home require extensive care from staff members, for instance, the nursing home may be entitled to a greater share of funding than facilities with residents needing less care.

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  • New cochlear implant could improve hearing (02/07/06)
    A ribbon-like cochlear implant developed at the University of Michigan could greatly improve hearing for profoundly deaf patients, and simplify insertion to help surgeons minimize damage to healthy ear tissue.

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  • Adults born with heart defects face special challenges later in life (02/06/06)
    video  Born with heart defects, many adults have grown up with limited function and the knowledge that their condition might shorten their lives. But the good news is that many adults with heart defects can have a life expectancy just like that of other Americans, especially if theyre treated by a doctor experienced with managing patients like them.

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  • Is high blood pressure in your genes? (02/06/06)
    video  A multi-year U-M study has revealed a link between high blood pressure and a particular gene variation. The discovery may help explain why some people develop high blood pressure and others don't and why some people's blood pressure increases as they age.

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  • Sex and the silver years (02/06/06)
    video  Despite myths to the contrary, many older adults can and do stay sexually active well into later life. Thats why a U-M sex therapist is encouraging adults over age 50 to get off the couch this Valentines Day and date, or find ways to strengthen their sexual relationship with their partner.

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  • Teaching kids healthy habits for life (02/06/06)
    video  The University of Michigan Health System believes schools can be a vehicle for healthy lifestyle changes that will last a lifetime and possibly help curb obesity in America. Thats why it created Project Healthy Schools, a program that is paving the way for a long, healthy life by teaching kids in middle schools how to eat right and exercise.

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  • For many aorta problems, minimally invasive procedure OK (02/02/06)
    Tens of thousands of Americans live with a ticking time bomb in their chests. Now, a new U-M study demonstrates that many of them may not need surgery in order to defuse it. Instead, research shows a minimally-invasive procedure can repair a wide range of problems in the upper part of the aorta, the giant blood vessel leading out of the heart.

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  • 2006 Womens Health and Fitness Day (02/01/06)
    From sexuality to infertility, financial planning and learning to take care of an elderly parent, a woman's biology and her socio-cultural, economic and physical environments are factors that affect both the duration and quality of her life. From the University of Michigan Medical School comes the unique opportunity to learn about these factors affecting women of all ages - and many more - during the second Women's Health and Fitness Day, a free event open to the public on Saturday, Feb. 11, in the Michigan League Ballroom.

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  • Treatment method improves survival for laryngeal cancer (02/01/06)
    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that determining early into treatment for cancer of the larynx, or voice box, which patients would benefit from chemotherapy and radiation treatment and which would be better off having surgery led to better survival rates than typically expected for this type of cancer.

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January 2006

  • Scientists spot solitary stem cells in living bone marrow (01/31/06)
    A new study provides compelling visual evidence that hematopoietic, or blood-forming, stem cells prefer a solitary life.

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  • Obese children twice as likely to have diabetes (01/30/06)
    Obese children are more than twice as likely to have diabetes than children of normal weight, according to a new study from the U-M Health System. Researchers estimates that of the more than 229,000 American children with diabetes, one-third of them are obese.

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  • U-M experts available to comment on State of the Union (01/30/06)
    U-M researchers who have studied the impact of out-of-pocket health costs on Americans behavior are available to comment on new consumer-driven health care proposals that President George W. Bush is expected to unveil in his State of the Union address on Tuesday evening.

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  • Bowl for Burns event starts in February (01/25/06)
    The Trauma Burn Center at the University of Michigan Health System will host the fundraising event, Bowl for Burns, from Friday, Feb. 3 through Saturday, March 4. The event will take place each Friday at 9 p.m., and Saturdays at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., at Parkway Lanes in Trenton, Mich.

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  • Few women rebuild breast after mastectomy (01/24/06)
    Fewer than 20 percent of American women eligible for breast reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer undergo the procedure despite mandated insurance, and experts at the University of Michigan Health System are hoping to uncover why.

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  • End-of-life wishes vary among racial and ethnic groups (01/23/06)
    A new study finds sometimes divergent views in how the racial and ethnic groups view health care, spirituality, family, and dying. Authors say the study is a reminder that is important for health care providers to treat everyone as an individual.

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  • New protein protects the heart from major cardiovascular damage (01/23/06)
    Its just one little amino acid, but it makes all the difference in protecting the heart from the harmful effects of heart attack and cardiac failure. U-M researchers suggest it could be the key to a new therapy for cardiovascular disease.

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  • Bariatric surgery triples among America's youth (01/18/06)
    A U-M Health System study has found that national rates of bariatric surgery climbed seven-fold from 1996 through 2002, and more than tripled among America's youth. The study also reported that hospitals charged more than $2 billion for bariatric surgery in 2002 alone, with private insurers picking up more than 80 percent of the costs.

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  • Women's silent health problem (01/17/06)
    It's a topic that is discussed so infrequently - - for reasons that are easy to understand - - that it may seem it isn't much of a problem. But new research shows that fecal incontinence is prevalent among U.S. women, especially those in older age groups, those who have had numerous babies, women whose deliveries were assisted by forceps or vacuum devices, and those who have had a hysterectomy.

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  • Heart attack patients do best when hospitals specialize (01/16/06)
    Across America, hospitals large and small are racing to offer angioplasty. But not all of them have the ability to do it on an emergency basis around the clock for heart attack patients. Now, a national study casts a shadow on this practice of "part-time" emergency angioplasty.

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  • Infection-fighting protein could be key to autoimmune disease (01/11/06)
    Scientists at the University of Michigan Medical School have discovered that a protein called cryopyrin responds to invading bacteria by triggering the activation of a powerful inflammatory molecule called IL-1beta, which signals the immune system to attack pathogens and induces fever to protect the body against infection.

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  • Common syndrome multiplies risk of heart attack, stroke (01/03/06)
    video  The old saying "three out of five ain't bad" might be true in sports. But when it comes to your heart, three out of five can definitely be bad. More doctors now agree that there are five basic factors that can lead to heart disease and diabetes and that anyone with at least three of these characteristics is at especially high risk.

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  • Cranked-up music on headphones can lead to hearing loss (01/03/06)
    video  Nothing is innately unhealthy about listening to iPods and other MP3 players, but listening to them with the volume turned up too high can cause lasting damage and irreversible hearing loss, a University of Michigan audiologist cautions.

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  • Hospital stroke unit opens; statewide study launches (01/03/06)
    Two new initiatives from the U-M Stroke Program will give stroke patients the best chance at recovery from potentially deadly brain attacks, through innovative care in a new hospital stroke unit, and a research effort that will involve hospitals statewide.

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  • Mother knew best: Ginger's medicinal benefits (01/03/06)
    video  A common mothers home remedy for a tummy ache or nausea has long been a glass of ginger ale or ginger tea. It turns out mom was onto something. Now U-M researchers are specifically looking at whether ginger can also be used to prevent nausea from chemotherapy.

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  • Turning down the heat to save money could cost your health (01/03/06)
    video  With home heating costs expected to soar this winter, millions of Americans will be dialing down their heat to save money. For most people, dialing-down just means a slightly chilly home, but for the elderly, it could bring serious health implications, including hypothermia.

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